17th Century Ship's Food.

Discussion in 'Food Storage - Canning/Freezing/Butchering/Prep' started by Keith H., Aug 23, 2017.

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  1. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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  2. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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  3. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Good links, thank you. Appreciated.
    Keith.
     
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  4. Crys B.

    Crys B. Active Member
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    I just made my first batch ever of hard tack. It's also known as ship's biscuit because this is one of the things they would store on the ships.

    It's currently in the oven.

    When it comes out, I'll see what it tastes like.

    Wish me luck!
     
  5. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Crys b. = I also have on cooking a batch of ship biscuits . I've been cooking them most days for week or so now and probably will be until spring , that's when I will quite burning wood for the winter , my cooking source . They are not gourmet eating but taste a lot better than I expected .
     
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  6. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    are you seasoning your hard tack /ship biscuits if so with what ? I've been seasoning mine with salt and spice blend called slap ya mama .
     
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  7. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    In the past people ate rather plain meals by today's standards. What exactly they ate depended on what was easily available where they lived. Most cultures had some sort of nut or grain that was a staple and it was prepared in a variety of ways most of which were rather simple. Mush, gruel and such were common and eaten in several ways. When fruit was in they ate it. When the crops came in, whatever they were, that became the primary source of food. Lots of people ate fish and animals that migrated and were only available part of the year.

    I think one of the hardest things for people to adapt to will be the rather bland meals that will be most common. They had special feasts at the times when food was plentiful but most of the time they ate small simple meals to insure that they wouldn't run out of food is something happened. When there is no certainty about your next meal or food for the winter you don't eat until you are full. You eat enough and stop. Taste really doesn't matter as much when all that you want to eat is enough to keep you going until the next meal.
     
  8. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    True enough, fortunately I like plain meals & it is very satisfying knowing that it all comes from your own garden.
    Keith.
     
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  9. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I'm a lot like you in that Keith. I was raised eating a lot of simple meals and still do. A big part of my game plan as far as food is concerned is beans, rice and corn. all dry and all stores real well. I have a hand powered grain meal so the corn will be used in a variety of simple ways. My garden will reflect a simple diet made up mostly of corn squash, potatoes, peas and beans.

    Rice and wheat just takes more work than it is worth for a gardening effort and both take rather special conditions that we don't have where I live now. Acorns here might be worthwhile thing and there are also pecans in some areas. As far as meat goes I will mostly raise small meal sized critters like chickens, ducks, goats. rabbits and potbelly pigs. fishing will also play a part in our food supply.

    Corn can be parched and eaten plain with a little salt. This sort of thing is what the Native Americans used as traveling foods. Corn, jerky and pemmican were mainstays for them.

    https://www.offthegridnews.com/off-...merican-foods-to-keep-you-alive-off-the-grid/

    Each of us will need to plan according to what is going to be available where we live. For me and most of the people in the South, corn pretty much fills the place that wheat does in the cooler regions. Now days that isn't an issue because people go to stores for their foods. My Grandparents didn't do this to the extent we do now so they raised my parents on corn breads rather then white bread. Flour was an imported luxury used for making cakes and such for special occasions and not the daily bread.

    Places that are really wet learn to use rice as the grain of choice and it hits the table in some form every day. I was raised in rice country and it was for breakfast lunch and dinner. You can even make white bread with rice flour.

    Just offering other thoughts from other places...
     
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  10. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    048c93355f18d7b607f0ec00491e9903.jpeg
     
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