30 Carbine Ruger Blackhawk

Discussion in 'Guns' started by randyt, Oct 27, 2019.

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  1. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    Note to self " do not go to gunshow with pocket of money, will leave with less money"

    anyhoo stopped by a gun show this morning and picked up a older ruger 30 carbine blac hawk, 7.5 inch barrel. Three screw, flat top, pre transfer bar. I have a couple others but they are newer with transfer bar. I think there may be a glitch with the carbine Blackhawk. In order to load, after opening the loading gate the hammer must moved to half cock in order to rotate cylinder. Is that correct? my newer blackhawks doesn't need to be moved to half cock.
     
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  2. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    did a web search. the old Blackhawk is working as it is suppose too. Basically the three screw ruger is a copy of a colt SA so it operates the same way. The newer black hawks are made on the same frame as a super Blackhawk. I thought this three screw seemed daintier compared to my other blackhawks.
     
  3. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Centuries ago, I was interested in a .30 carbine chambered single-action. Needs a barrel. You got one at 7.5 inch. The .22 mag also needs a barrel. Me, I've thought about a Ruger in .327 mag, 7-shot, small frame, adjustable sights. The frame is downright cute; looks petite; has no weight. Paternal grandpaw carried a 32-20 revolver.

    Found this article online
    https://www.tactical-life.com/combat-handguns/rugers-new-model-blackhawk-30-carbine/

    Ruger .327 Fed mag, Single Seven,
    https://www.gunsamerica.com/digest/ruger-327/

    https://www.ruger.com/products/newModelSingleSixSingleSeven/models.html

    The .327 ammo is hard to locate. Buy in bulk or reload.
     
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  4. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I've always thought that the 327 mag had a lot of potentials. It offers +P 9mm power in a small light framed revolver that is easily concealed. My wife carries a 5 shot Taurus 85 38 special that I reload to 357 mag levels. that the Taurus frame is solid like a Ruger with no side plates to weaken it. I've never noticed any problem with it handling the pressures but those are only for defensive carry and not shot very often. I reload a new batch about once a year. I've always liked to load 357 mag into 38 special cases for MY use in a 357 target gun. A fuller case means a more uniform burn from round to round and tightened up my groups a little bit. I paint the bottom with red nail polish so I KNOW which ones are loaded that way.

    I've always thought that I could reload a 30 carbine and make it a massively effective round for a handgun. The problem though was finding bullets for it that were not ball FMJ. I shot a 30 carbine Blackhawk a few times and really liked it. My Blackhawk 357/9mm convertible had the longer 7.5" barrel.

    Back at that time, the 30 carbine rounds were a very common sort of like the 9mm and 5.56 are now. The big attraction was the availability of cheap ammo and having a handgun in the same round as your go-to gun. Before the advent of the M-16, the M1 carbine was THE light assault weapon of choice for many. It was popular for all the same reasons that the AR-15 is popular. Short and Light with low recoil, lighter ammo, larger capacity magazines. I personally still think that for close-quarters work that I would still take it over an AR-15. If all you could shoot was FMJ ammo.

    Ruger used to do a transfer bar conversion on the old Blackhawks for free. I don't know if they still do it for free but any old model Blackhawk that you send them gets the conversion. they return the parts and as far as I know, it doesn't affect the collecters value at all. It makes it a much safer gun that you can carry safely with 6 rounds. If you are going to use it as a shooter I recommend it.
     
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  5. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    TexDanm,

    I had an on line conversation with an Israeli and asked him why the .30 Carbine was so popular in Israel...and he told me the basic outline of what you stated above.

    That the .30 carbine was light and quick....and well suited for police getting into and out of vehicles. Good capacity, Hence it's popularity among their constabulary. Until he told me I would never have considered it.

    Now with the advent of the M4 Carbines the .30 carbine has pretty much been replaced. But as I understand it the Israeli ammunition manufacturers are sitting on a large batch of .30 Carbine ammunition...and willing to sell.

    Thanks for reminding me of this conversation...some time back.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  6. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    Double up on the hearing protection when you shoot it.
     
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  7. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    yes, it has a bit of a bark. I was under my porch roof taking a few pot shots and the tin roof accentuated the noise level quite a bit. I picked up a bianchi holster for it on line earlier today.
     
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  8. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    WWII; my dad didn't like his Thompson sub machine-gun; loved his .30 carbine, when supplied one. My dad was a thick-chested burly fellow w/huge arms, still he thought the Thompson was awkward. The M1 carbine he found "cute" and easy to bring up and fire quickly. I've only held Thompsons; never fired one. I totally agree with my dad concerning the M1 carbine, just never bought one. Now they are too expensive. I've got a little peashooter carbine in 9mm and totally love it. Can't really say that it is in any way something for military or police, but still I like it. Post-SHTF, I see it as being the perfect medicine for stray dogs; packs form in this region and are dangerous, kill deer and spread rabies. For home defense, I think that the .357 lever is superior by far and coupled with a revolver w/speed-loaders, all the better.

    There's something about the 9mm that leaves me insecure. People in the know say that loading the 9mm with heavier bullets doesn't even help. During WWII, a fellow showed my dad his jacket with a line of holes raked through it diagonally. The fellow had been wearing it. German shot him with subgun in 9mm (probably a Steyer?). OK, so the rounds were FMJs, still ... . Not only did the guy live through being shot and surgery, he was back around active duty soldiers in a hot area -- I don't know if he was total active duty or not, but my dad told the story as if he thought the guy was A-OK. I think that it has been well-established that dead men can return fire until their lights go out. The .357 will slam a bad guy and if the bullet's nose is flat and exposed soft lead, traveling at 1400 ft/sec+, then something's gotta give (.357 carbine = over 1000 ft/lb energy). "Cute" is for dog control. Slamming things is for when something has to hit the ground right now.

    Saw a Henry .41 mag lever for sale this past weekend. What a shame that these Henry rifles do not have a side loading port. Lever with side loading port + .41 mag chamber = Nirvana machine.
     
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  9. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Yes, I would prefer a side loading port but I will settle for the tube. 10+44 mag. Thumper and not from the movie.
     
  10. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Olde Geezer...

    I have been, on occasion , taking a Grandma and her grandson to the gun club. They have been shooting my Ruger GP 100 with both .38 Specials and on occasion .357 Magnums...mostly on the indoor range.

    Now on the outdoor range they have been introduced to my Henry Carbine in .357 Magnum/.38 Speical. Now they verily like this rifle ..even in .357 Magnum.

    In the GP 100 revolver .357 Magnum can be a bit much and mostly we stick to .38 Specials.

    But with the weight of the Carbine...they enjoy it greatly. The youngster needs a bit more maturing in the muscle development but he is game..and not gun shy...so to speak. I keep a close eye on him and Grandma.....at the range...but I want them to enjoy and learn.

    Over time ..I intend to introduce them to the .41 Magnum full length Henry rifle as well. Also my Henry in .22 long rifle.



    I too like the side loading gate...but Marlins in .41 Magnum are difficult to find and expensive.

    I settled for the Henry brand....American Made.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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