33% of Brits have an emergency kit, but most of them don't have anything to start a fire

Discussion in 'All Resources About Fire' started by Damorale, Jun 3, 2016.

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  1. Damorale

    Damorale Active Member
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    I was reading an article earlier (it popped up on my Facebook wall) that said that 1/3 of people in the UK have a "grab and go" bag for emergencies, but the majority of them don't include things which would be crucial if they had to survive in the wild. Most of them had mobile phones or canned food, but didn't have simple fire starting equipment such as matches!

    As most people wouldn't know where to begin with starting a fire without matches or a lighter. I think most people would just grab two sticks and rub them together, and hope something happened!
     
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  2. OursIsTheFury

    OursIsTheFury Expert Member
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    Well to be fair, it's mostly for city calamities, like storms, earthquakes, or fires. I don't think they would anticipate someone being transported in the jungle or anything like that, when they were designing the grab bags that would be placed on emergency exits in homes. So it's not really that big of a deal, because with civilization and society, I think statistically, there are a good number of people that would be able to start a fire in the city, in the event of a calamity, and fire can be passed on from group to group just like that. So it is more important in the city to have first aid kits, as well as other gear that would be used to help in temporary crises.
     
  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    i'd be inclined to take with "a pinch of salt" any "fact" that was quoted on Facebook, I suspect the actual number is much lower-far lower, and what is in these grab and go bags?
     
  4. ToTang45

    ToTang45 Expert Member
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    I'm inclined to agree. I literally don't think I know anyone who has a 'grab and go bag' - hell, even myself as someone familiar with the concept of what it and what's it's there for, and had also thought I should be putting them together for my family still haven't had the foresight to put it together.
    That being said, at the very least one would think you'd pack some form of lighter. Yes, you may live in the city and the disaster may be city based but there is a chance you'd have to get as far from the city as you possibly could and in essence fire could well become your lifeline. And it';s not like it's going to take up a hell of a lot of space or weight either. It's literally a Zippo lighter and some lighter fluid.
     
  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I suspect that anyone- especially in the UK- who pops up on Facebook and says "I've got a grab and go bag" is only saying it for their 15 minutes of fame and literally has no more than a mobile phone and a credit card. I know people even out here who don't even own a torch(flashlight) and the only people with lighters or matches are either smokers or pyromaniacs. a few motorists may carry a first aid kit but most don't.
     
  6. Damorale

    Damorale Active Member
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    The article I read was quoting some research conducted by a university, it might have been Sheffield university. I'll double check later when I've got a bit more time. I also doubted that 1/3 of people had a bag ready for emergencies, and perhaps the question was phrased badly so that people were confused about what a grab and go bag was. Obviously these types or research have to be taken with a pinch of salt anyway, as you are depending on people to tell the truth when they are asked the questions which people rarely do.
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    exactly. 33% is far too high, a high exaggeration in my experience, the true figure is much less than 10%-more likely to be in single figures.
    if you add in all the preppers, survivalists, smallholders, off gridders, back to the landers and the like, the true figure will be closer to 1%.
     
  8. ToTang45

    ToTang45 Expert Member
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    Ha, it's funny you should say that. I used to smoke, and had a heap of lighters when I did.
    But since quitting I don't.

    I couldn't even begin to guess how many Zippo lighters I've had in my life that have just vanished into thin area (in some cases I suspect they've been pinched.)
     
  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    disposable lighters are cheap enough on Ebay, I have 150 and I gave up smoking over 20 years ago!
     
  10. jonthai

    jonthai New Member
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    People don't usually think of the occasion of starting a fire, and there's no full-proof way of starting a fire. Putting matches or a lighter into a emergency kit ,would be rather dangerous and i don't think people would assume the consequences if someone actually got hurt with that.
     
  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    how can matches or a lighter in a kit be dangerous? fire in an emergency situation is more important than immediate access to food or even water, it keeps you warm and it deters wild animals.
     
  12. Lisa

    Lisa Active Member
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    I agree, most people in British cities wouldn't be thinking about starting fires, if there was an evacuation from peoples homes in a city it's highly unlikely that they would be going anywhere in the wilderness.
     
  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    especially in Britain. it might be different in say America with their history, or even Australia, but city folk in Britain aren't suddenly going to abandon their homes and head for the countryside on foot, for a start not many would get very far, and where would they go? The modern population hasn't got that kind of mindset, they need it all doing for them, nope in the UK that's a non starter.
     
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  14. Lisa

    Lisa Active Member
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    I went to live in a city a few years ago for a while and most of the people I knew there didn't know how to put up a tent or start a bbq.

    The British people would probably be trying to avoid fire anywhere since the cities would be burning before long, I was living in Manchester when the riots were going on, my colleagues had to get locked in the building we worked in because of what was going on outside. No one is going to hot foot it out of the city and into the country, a survival kit for that kind of event would probably consist of a weapon and some cash to barter with.
     
  15. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I lived in a city for 43 years and whilst I spent as much time as possible in the countryside(well, my mother was a farmers daughter), most of the people I knew were more interested in going to the pub, or going clubbing, or where they were going for their next foreign holiday.
    from what I've seen, most people wouldn't know one animal from another( a guy at a county show thought a young calf was a goat!) and definitely don't know where their food comes from.
     
  16. Lisa Davis

    Lisa Davis Active Member
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    Here in the U.S., I would bet dollars to donuts that way less than 33% of all people have a grab-n-go bag for emergencies. Actually, some of the people I know that actually do have one, only about half of those bags are what I would call anywhere near adequate. My grab-n-go bag weighs about 19 pounds and is in a backpack, so I don't have to worry about portability. Nineteen pounds seems heavy but you can carry that on your back with ease.
     
  17. Rere

    Rere New Member
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    People don't usually think of the occasion of starting a fire, and there's no full-proof way of starting a fire. Putting matches or a lighter into a emergency kit ,would be rather dangerous and i don't think people would assume the consequences if someone actually got hurt with that.
     
  18. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    The "full-proof" way of starting a fire is to have the skill & experience. You don't need matches or a lighter, though I do not see the danger in these.
    Keith.
     
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