A Must Have Survival Item

Discussion in 'Suggestions and Requests' started by Jessec16, Jun 15, 2018.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. Jessec16

    Jessec16 New Member
      1/29

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I found this water filter called a Miniwell and it is soo amazing I thought I should show you guys. It filters out 99% of all water born diseases/parasites and you can attatch it to anything. Like a hose, water bottle or tube. You can even just use it like a straw. It's so cool I tried the Life Straw but it does not filter like this one. I literally bring it wherever I go now. What do you guys think?
    https://tinyurl.com/y8eogagr
     
    Crys B. likes this.
  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    thanks, I prefer the Sawyer mini water filter, I'll stick with that.
     
  3. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      375/460

    Blog Posts:
    1
    I like the Sawyer too. I have a couple the minis and a larger one set up with a 5 gallon gravity system. I keep one in my boat and the other one in my always carry truck bug out kit. This actually looks a lot like the Sawyer. Water is a must so I have a lot of directions to go. I also have 3 different types of survival straws. They are ok but have very limited life expectancy. I carry one in my fishing kit.
     
  4. arctic bill

    arctic bill Expert Member
      123/115

    Blog Posts:
    0
    we used to use all sort of this type of stuff on canoe trips . chemicals, filters, ultraviolet, ect. the trouble was the following.
    1) chemicals you could only use for two weeks maximum .
    2) filters blocked up with debri very quickly and then were very slow, one minute for a cup of water.
    3) ultra violet killed the germs but did not remove and debri . I personally like to boil a gallon of water every morning and then people can use it to make tea, coffee, oatmeal , or just let it cool and put it in your water bottle , maybe even add kool aid or gatorade to it.
    Bill
     
  5. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      375/460

    Blog Posts:
    1
    I wonder just how dangerous just drinking the water is to people in the long run. I imagine at first most people would experience some disorders but after you adapt to many of them that problem would subside. If drinking unpurified water is so deadly how do all the animals survive? Hogs especially have digestive systems very similar of people and here in Texas they are flourishing and surviving in huge numbers without purified water. They are big healthy suckers too so it isn't like they are struggling.

    I know that the dogs and cats all seem to prefer pond, puddle or ditch water over their water bowls filled with "safe" tap water. I used to bathe and swim in a pond every day during the summer. Let's be real when you are getting the water in your nose and mouth while swimming you might as well drink the water. I was never sick. I would come home and rinse off in my outdoors shower and that was my daily ritual.

    I watch my dogs and cat and notice that they eat certain grasses every chance they get. I wonder if they are getting some sort of protection from parasitic problems from these weeds and grasses. I know that they seem to eat it and then a little later throw it back up.

    I think that over time people will get tougher as far as the low grade bacterial infections. I think that I an already sort of that way because of my regular exposure to dirt and water that isn't from a tap or bottle. What you have to understand about water is that what you can probably drink and what you should NEVER drink has a lot to do with how many people have come into contact with that water before you.

    Rivers, streams and ditches are going to be possibly contaminated by typhoid and cholera pretty fast. A pond that is isolated is probably going to be safer. a fresh puddle after a rain is almost certainly fairly safe after you develop a little bit of resistance to the dirt born bacteria.

    Something that people don't talk about now days that our fairly recent ancestors knew all about was how to deal with intestinal parasites. Tobacco ortant thing and a good treatment for all sorts of things. Mineral oil used to be used as well. It might pay us to explore some of the old ways. Eventually you are going to run out of bleach, your filters will wear out, you will use your last pill and then like it or not you are going to have to drink the water. The more you boil the better but that just isn't a total answer unless you bathe in boiled water, wash your dishes in boiled water and maybe even wash your clothes in boiled water.

    I have probably drank more untreated water than treated in the last 30 years. I had a shallow water well. I also regularly drank out of a cistern filled with untreated rainwater or even water from an old school open well. I spend a lot of time fishing and swimming in lakes, rivers and ponds.

    Just something to think about...
     
  6. watcherchris

    watcherchris Expert Member
      232/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Being in the Military and traveling around the globe...particularly in my younger years...I noticed that for about a week when going to a new place...I would have an upset stomach. Sometimes it was a pretty rough week. But after that it would settle out.

    I am thinking all of that was an adjustment to the new area and in particular to the new water exposure as my system adapted.

    I notice this during the two months I was RAF Mildenhall England from here at Langley Air Force Base here in Virginia.

    I have also noticed it when traveling about this country.....not as extreme but it is there.

    Just some food for thought.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
     
    Ystranc likes this.
  7. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      375/460

    Blog Posts:
    1
    Each area has its own bacteria that may be NEARLY identical to the ones elsewhere but not exactly. When you go there at first your body has inferior resistance to the unfamiliar bugs and then adapts. Montezuma's revenge is common and not just in Mexico.

    Nowadays people are so clean that they barely have resistance to the germs that are native to where they live. I've seem kids from homes where things were kept so clean and sterile that when the kids go to school they spend the first several years sick. I worked for a woman that pulled out ALL of her appliances weekly so she could clean and mop the floors under them. She lived with a bottle of antibacterial cleaner in her hands and any time she saw her kids touch anything she was washing their hands with it. They nearly died when they went to school.

    When we first move here and my wife went to work in the prisons it was a little tough. Prisons bring the germs from all over the place and then are stuffed together in close confined quarters to spread and breed. We had a cold almost constantly that first year as new Rhinoviruses were brought here then home to me. When you have 3000 men locked up in an unairconditioned prison in tight close and crowded conditions the flu can become a MONSTER. If it gets to spreading all they can do is lock it down and let it run its course in that block.
     
    Crys B. likes this.
  8. arctic bill

    arctic bill Expert Member
      123/115

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I believe that we need some germs to keep our immune system up and running. as texmanm pointed out it is not good to live in a germ free environment.
     
  9. Crys B.

    Crys B. Member
      23/29

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I think this is a good point. After all, humans used to drink unfiltered water.

    I think the answer lies in the fact that we've lost immunity because people were so scared of diseases, bacteria, and other things. So, they filtered things. And as a result, we don't have the immunity anymore.
     
    Ystranc likes this.
  10. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
      277/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Like Chris, I usually find that water in an area that is new to me can effect me adversely for a very brief time and then I get used to the new mix of bacteria. The problems stem from the fact that there are some bacteria that can make you really sick.
    In answer to the point that "humans used to drink unfiltered water"...they still do. In third world countries people drink unfiltered water and die in their thousands. This is exacerbated by endemic disease, high population density and poor sanitation.
    It may well be that if you live in a low population density area close to the source, you're reasonably sensible and other people in the area are considerate of drinking water quality for those downstream you would only get sick for a little while(you may not even notice) before learning to tolerate the organisms in your drinking water but my advice is to filter or boil water that you intend to drink, just in case.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2018
  11. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      375/460

    Blog Posts:
    1
    One of the things that I suspect will be hardest for a lot of people to adjust to and get over is the idea that there is no such thing as acceptable risk. Now days, at least in the US, no amount of risk is allowed. This is in part because if you know that there is a risk and do it anyway if someone is harmed you are sued for negligence and will be in trouble. That is why everything that you buy has a book with iot with warnings about any and all possible ways that you could misuse and be harmed by their product. I mean REALLY do they need to warn people that buy a clothes iron not to iron their clothes while wearing them. They do if they want to avoid being sued.

    Schools don't allow kids to have recess anymore and go out to play because if one gets hurt they get sued. If someone came up with a drug that cured cancer but if one person in a million would die from an allergic reaction to it they would probably never get the FDA to pass on it and allow it to be used.

    This legal problem has led to people thinking that a lot of things that are not really all that dangerous are deadly because one person may have died while using it and even if there is no real connection to that item they must disclose that someone died while they were using it. Water that isn't treated is no necessarily dangerous. One of the things that is funny is the idea that bottled water is safer than regular water. Most bottle spring water comes right out of the ground and into the bottles with no treatment at all. The standards for public tap water is a lot higher than that for bottled water.

    Where I live lots of people get their water from shallow private wells and there is no filtering or treatment to it whatsoever. This leads to all sorts of water and people drink it with no problems. We have sulfur, lime, coal and natural gas in a lot of the water here. The sulfer water smells like rotten eggs! The lime makes a white scale on everything and blocks the screens in the faucets. The coal turns things black and also plugs filters. My favorite and it is common in parts of the county is the natural gas. You can turn on a water faucet and then set fire to the water. SERIOUSLY, it burns with a pretty blue flame. All of this is nonetheless considered good for drinking. I drank and lived on a well for most of my adult life.

    When you go someplace there is a period of adaptation. There are just a lot of different bacteria and minerals in water that once you are used to is no problem but at first may upset your system. As I've often said, if you regularly drink a little from fresh clean puddles you won't have as much trouble adapting if you ever have to. I little good clean dirt may actually be good for you. Life will be a lot dirtier after tap water is only a memory. I worked the fields when I was young and not adverse to being dirty and sweat isn't something that I am bothered by.

    A lot of people now days act like there is something awful about being hot and sweating. When they start sweating buckets they will get a lot less interested in treating every drop of water they drink.
     
  12. Oldguy

    Oldguy Well-Known Member
      70/115

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Dirty water used to kill those who could not handle it
    No thanks I will pass on that.
    Had a dose of dirty water once, I survived but was down for many weeks, something I do not care to repeat thanks.:oops:
     
  13. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
      300/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    "Worldwide, approximately 140 million people develop dysentery each year, and about 600,000 die." https://www.geni.com/projects/People-who-died-from-Dysentery/28045

    There are things to which one cannot adapt.

    A dog's stomach is FAR (10x) more acid than that of a human.
    http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=1288

    The fermentation going on in the guts of ruminants, i.e. cattle types of critters, increases the acidity therein. The acidity provides protection, but not absolute protection.

    If a non-civilized people adapt to the local water supply and the mothers breastfeed their babies (passive immunity; antibody transfer), then they have significant protection to this water supply. Outsiders drinking the same water will develop dysentery. When powdered baby formula was distributed to poor nations, hundreds of thousands of babies died, because the mothers mixed local water supplies into the formula.

    Most people from developed nations, drinking purified water most of their lives, will need to purify their water or experience varying degrees of gastrointestinal upset on into overt dysentery.

    Keep in mind also that in primitive times, people just didn't live as long as they did in this day and age. Those who did were biologically ROBUST. They were tougher than leather and they had guts ... if you know what I mean.

    My people "up in the mountains" lived long lives. Note that they drank water coming straight out the side of the mountain, out of the cracked rocks -- zero exposure to dirt. Their diets included salt preserved foods and they boiled their vegetables (throwing in slices of salt-cured fatback). I eat salty food and do not have high blood pressure (only certain med.s give my hypertension).
     
  14. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
      277/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Those most at risk are infants and elderly, those suffering from radiation sickness or malnutrition which weaken their immune system. The rest of us can suffer horribly in the short term but we usually get past it unless we contract one of the really nasty bugs. If you do end up getting sick it can make you even more dehydrated. Where I've lived over the years it has always been too densely populated or intensively farmed for the streams to be pure enough to drink from (other than at source)
    I've never seen the point in taking chances. My entire survival ethos is about managing risk.
     
  15. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I've always drank straight from the streams on Dartmoor, but in an area where its intensively farmed especially arable crops where they use a lot of chemicals, fertilisers and pesticides one would just be asking for trouble.
     
  16. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
      277/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    A few years back I was checking out a cave system at a place called Loggerheads in N. Wales where there is a picture perfect fresh water spring.
    30 yrds downstream was a dead sheep layed rotting in the water....a recipe for botulism if ever there was one. An image like that in your mind can shape your attitudes.
     
  17. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Bear Grylls would have eaten it...….raw!!:p
     
  18. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
      277/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    That's something I would love to watch, from beyond the range of his projectile vomiting.
     
  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      375/460

    Blog Posts:
    1
    I am a culinary adventurer and will eat ALMOST anything but that guy is nuts.
     
  20. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    you got that right Tex.
    he's an accident waiting to happen.
     
  21. F22 Simpilot

    F22 Simpilot Member
      18/29

    Blog Posts:
    0
    The fire piston! But water is a definite must.
     
  22. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    you can like for 3 weeks without food but only 3 DAYS without water.
     
  23. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
      277/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    The principle of a fire piston is pretty cool and I would like to mess around with one however you can live without one but yes, potable water is an absolute need.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2018
  24. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      375/460

    Blog Posts:
    1
    I've made a couple and bought one fire piston and they work pretty well IF you have some grease to make the seals slide well and seal totally. Without that they degrade to useless pretty fast in my admittedly small number of samples. You also need something that is very dry and flammable for it to work effectively. Charcloth works real well but that is a circuitous problem because you need fire to make it and without it finding or making something that will work well can be interesting to say the least in the woods.

    The question of "What is the most important thing to have in a survival situation" needs to be zeroed in on a specific situation. You can go for 21 days without food so it is not an urgent need. Water you only last about three days without so it is pretty urgent. If it is cold you won't last three hours if you don't have some way to get warmer be it fire, clothing or a blanket. If you are in the water you have about three minutes under it before you drown so a flotation device can be am IMMEDIATE need.

    Where I live water is pretty easy to find and methods to make it relatively safe to drink are pretty easy to make. We don't have cold weather like many of you do in the more northern areas so keeping from dying from exposure is pretty easy. If you know what is available and are willing to eat things that are not your normal fare, food is a simple to fix problem. I am about as likely to drown as a killer whale and can sleep in the water even without a life preserver. By living in a very gentle and mostly hospitable environment makes survival needs mostly a matter of comfort rather than life or death so for me a good medical kit might be near the top of the list of must haves. Accidents happen and if you don't take care of things infections can be killers.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2018
    Ystranc likes this.
  25. Crys B.

    Crys B. Member
      23/29

    Blog Posts:
    0

    That's weird that the water could have been fresh further upstream from an animal corpse. Its... creepy.
     
  26. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      375/460

    Blog Posts:
    1
    I would never drink directly from a small creek. There is just too much that can get you and you don't know what is upstream from you. Find a sand bar and back well away from the creak and dig a hole. The water will slowly fill it and that water is going to be a lot less likely to bite you in the butt. You can even do this at a beach to find drinkable water. Fresh water floats on top of salt water. back off the beach and dig a big hole down into the sand until you find wet sand. The hole will fill and if you have a straw or are very careful not to stir it up the water on the top will be fresh enough to drink.

    Where I was raised they built a saltwater dam that was about 6 or 7 feet underwater. This was to keep storm tides from running the salt water up into the creeks and killing the fish and making the water too salty for livestock to drink. It was a freshwater river probably nearly 40 miles from the coast but down deep it was salty and you could catch crabs there. Every Once in a while someone would catch a shark on a deep trotline. If you set your lines too deep the catfish would go down and bite but them die because they couldn't live in the salt water.
     
    Ystranc likes this.
  27. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    not really, stands to reason, any contamination from the corpse would travel downstream not up.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
A Car Survival Kit Should be a Must for Everybody Survival Kits Jan 25, 2016
Must Haves for Outdoor Survivalists Essential Items Jan 21, 2016
Must Have Tools Guns, Knives, Tools, Etc. Mar 24, 2018
My 50 essential must-have items in every emergency Wilderness Jul 29, 2016
Must have travel food Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food Jul 4, 2016
Must You Scarify Seeds? Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming Jun 22, 2016
The mustang grape Other Homesteading Jun 5, 2016
What first aid supplies are a must? First Aid and Medicine Jan 17, 2016
The Ugly Side Of Survival Mental Preparedness Aug 28, 2018
I Made A Survival Text-based Game You May Be Interested In The Hangout Aug 15, 2018

Share This Page