Advice To New Preppers

Discussion in 'Going Off The Grid' started by poltiregist, Sep 6, 2019.

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  1. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Everyone has their own idea as to how a new prepper should proceed with their new endeavor . Perhaps various thoughts on this might help someone .
     
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  2. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Everyone's situation is a bit different but maybe some ideas might help and then discard the ideas that don't fit .
     
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  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    start with the basics, food, water, shelter, first aid.
     
  4. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Poltiregist and Lone Wolf,

    I'd start out with:

    A. The individual prepper and health
    B. The prepper and clothing

    Ref A; Are you in good shape to proceed with your enter plans ? For example, do you have the immunizations you need? Are they current? Do you have records of this ... to include health records (the CDC 731 is A+) for evacs ? For health comforts reasons, do you use any ointments, balms, other over the counter stuff ?

    B. Do you have proper clothing to include boots ? Consider how many extra of everything should be on your "to do" list. Clothing/boots requires like in industry, "support systems". Do you need/have rubber over-boots or regular change into rubber boots - with tote bag to carry ? Do you have saddle soap/polish for leather boots ? Foot powder ? The BEST socks you can get ?! Masking tape or other tape for pods. If not understanding this point, wait until "C.".

    C. Then continue;













    !)
     
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  5. NomadWill

    NomadWill Expert Member
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    Start Simple.

    1. Find free resources. Youtube, the Internet, Here lol.
    2. Learn all you can, hone your existing skills, and dont be afraid to learn new skills.
    3. Network, meet people like you.
    4. Get Gear and Learn/Know how to use said gear, and do it frequently so when and If SHTF you'll be calm as a cucumber and prepared to do whatever you need to get done.
     
  6. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Start at getting what you will need for survival for one month . Then when you can afford it two months . its surprising how fast things escalate . Here in the U.S. food is the easy part . Water could be more difficult depending on your particular situation . If the prepper is looking long term , water could dictate moving to a sustainable location .
     
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  7. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Expert Member
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    1) Slow, steady, and balanced progress avoids burnout and costly mistakes. Things like flashlights, fire extinguishers, CO/smoke detector, weather alert radio, battery jumper cables, etc before a year of freeze dried survival food or 5k rounds of ammo for your firearm. Common sense stuff usually makes it easier to get the spouse on board with preparedness if they aren't already.

    2) Consider the preparedness angle on any new items you purchase, particularly on major purchases like vehicles, appliances, or a new home/home improvements. A vehicle with better gas mileage, four wheel drive, or more cargo capacity, instead of getting the upgraded sound system and heated leather seats options. A gas range (kitchen stove) that doesn't require electricity to work to replace your old electric stove. If replacing windows in your home, compare the specifications of the different glazing (glass) to get the characteristics you want. In colder climates, glazing with a high solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) will let more infrared/heat into the house and might make sense on the sun facing side of the house. On the non-sun side, low-e glazing usually has better insulation/R-value to reduce heat loss. Many, many other examples, and over time these little changes in purchasing decisions can really make a big difference in overall preparedness and doesn't necessarily cost more.

    3) Whenever possible, replace items before they break or fail completely, and save the old one as a usable spare.

    4) Try to standardize on fuel/power requirements for your gear as much as possible. AA batteries and/or ~12 volts DC power for electronics, and gasoline for your vehicle/generator/camp stove/tractor/rototiller/chainsaw (etc), just as examples. Whatever fuel/power makes the most sense for you, but AA batteries are very common and everyone with a vehicle already has a 12v battery and charger (alternator) anyway so they are good choices imo. 12V is also common for alternative power like solar, wind, and micro-hydro if you add those later. Helps limit the number of different fuels you have to store, more power compatibility between equipment, less adapters/converters required, and could save a lot of money down the road. Just choose carefully before acquiring too much gear since changing to a different standard later can be very expensive.
     
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  8. Idwanderer

    Idwanderer Well-Known Member
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    Start with some paper, pencil and binder of some sort. Not a computer. Write down your goals and intent. In chapter 2/3 list the most likely thing that you're going to face. Think and research whats peculiar to that situation and start there. You're more prepared than you think. Each of us face differing threats (hurricanes, wild fires, etc) so what advise we may give may not be to your best advantage. Write down what you need for that first threat you listed and start there. Then go to the next threat. Don't hurry and don't worry about the destination … but keep the journey active and consistently one step at a time. You'll get there ...
     
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  9. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    First thing to do is relax, chill-out. Basically preppers are simply doing what their ancestors did.

    > Preparing for hard winters, droughts.
    > Reinforcing dwelling against bad storms, gales, drought, heavy snows, ... . Making dwelling hardened against attacking savages.
    > Finding clean water and purifying unclean water.
    > Picking firearms for game and interloping humans.
    > Choosing the best transportation modes for one's location and for when forced to leave.
    > Putting back enough kerosene and fire wood.
    > Putting together the proper tools.
    > Finding the proper crops to grow and the equipment needed to grow them.

    The bulleted items I've listed above have been true throughout human history. True now for those who would prepare for hard times.

    My family lived like that. I so respect my ancestors for they ALWAYS lived in what I would call "hard times". However, they likely called their existence "routine". My grandmother canned food because that was "what one does". We grew gardens because that was "what people do". And my sweet little grandmother kept a revolver near by. She was no fool.

    In this day and age, people have gone soft. Preppers aren't special -- they are simply returning to the standards set by their ancestors. Prepping isn't from outer space; it isn't odd in any way, shape, form, or fashion. Sometimes times are good. Sometimes times are bad. Welcome to Earth.

    Sheeple ignore the hard realities of our existence and have so far gotten by with having their souls being composed mainly of marshmallow. Preppers are people who have common sense, muscle, bone, and guts. Seems too that preppers are those who paid attention while reading history books.

    The weak are composed of either gamblers or the overtly stupid. Preppers are neither.
     
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  10. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    I agree with the Old Geezer on this one;
    Knowledge is the first key. Then comes practice.
     
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