Ar15 Or 9mm Carbine Ar Platform

Discussion in 'General Q&A' started by Belltown1, Feb 28, 2019.

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  1. Belltown1

    Belltown1 New Member
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    I want to get my first AR 556 but problem is where I live there is basically no where to shoot/train on it so if I got it I’ll prob use it once every few months or even longer.. farthest range from me that alows 556 is prob an hour and half. So for shtf I was thinking maybe ar platform 9mm. Obviously 556 would be great but how great for me and my family if I haven’t trained on it. I’d be more accurate with 9mm carbine
     
  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    If you can"t shoot or train on a 556, then get the 9 mm carbine. There some nice points to having a pistol caliber carbine and a matching caliber pistol. There is a new AR15 platform coming out soon "350 Legend" and I think it is based off a 357 Maximum round. Not sure on the details, so you may want to check it out. JM2C
     
  3. Belltown1

    Belltown1 New Member
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    Thanks for the info!
     
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  4. RICH-FL

    RICH-FL Well-Known Member
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    You are talking night and day.

    The NATO 5.56mm/.223 rem with over 3000 FPS and is used by military and hunters for long range accurate shooting (Over 200 meters).

    The 9mm is a fine hand gun round with over 1250 FPS. Range is out to about 50 meters.

    See the difference in a built up area (City/urban) the 9mm is the way to go. But once you get outside the city you need to longer range and higher energy of the NATO 5.56 round.

    Okay everyone here is a simple question:
    What is the difference between NATO 5.56 and the .223 rem rounds?????
     
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  5. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Answer to your question, case pressure;

    The Op wanted to know about the benefit of a weapon he would not be able to train on vs. a weapon of lower velocity and terminal ballistics (hand gun round) that he would be able to train on. With all things being equal, I would prefer the 556 over a 9 mm carbine. But if I could only shoot and train with a handgun round carbine, that is the one I would pick. Better to be proficient with a handgun round carbine then to stumble around with an unfamiliar 556. JM2C
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2019
  6. IBME

    IBME Expert Member
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    Speaking just for me-myself and I would forget the AR-15 and master a high capacity 9mm pistol that can take a 33 round magazine. Maybe something like the Glock 34.
    or if you can find one a Glock 24 and a wolf 9mm barrel.

    Just to make you cry.........I have five private shooting ranges, and a shooting house.

    Can you legally carry a handgun where you live.....???
     
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  7. Snyper

    Snyper Well-Known Member
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    Shooting out your cabin window again? ;)
     
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  8. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Maybe the above mentioned calibers for short range or home defense.

    The .223/5.56 bullets are too small & light for real military use, thus the military is headed up to the heavier 6.8mm rifle round. People use cars and trees and whatever else to gain cover -- you gotta shoot through the materials the enemy considers "cover". Your weapon must at the very least go through house walls and floors and ceilings and roofs ... whatever ... and still retain sufficient energy to do fatal damage to the human body.

    Currently, many people are going for the 6.5 Creedmore. It isn't a particularly powerful round, however the bullets available for this caliber have excellent ballistic coefficients plus the bullets are heavy enough to penetrate building materials and enemy helmets at 300 yrds. The 6.5 Swedish and the 7mm Mauser have been around forever. Nobody in their right mind ever questioned their effectiveness even though they were beneath the energy levels of the old stand-by's 30-06, 7.62 Nagant, 8mm Mauser, and the newer 7.62 NATO (early 1950s). The .303 Brit is an old war horse.

    Me, I'm glad our military is moving up to the 6.8mm. Nothing wrong with the .223/5.56, its a great varmint round. It will drop humans who are not protected by shielding or cover. It will shoot through a helmet at 100 yards I think. At short range, it's effective against 150 lb critters four and two legged. The round is too small to meet state specifications for legal deer cartridges. Most warriors wish something more powerful than the 5.56 NATO.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2019
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  9. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Just about every caliber has it's place and purpose. Long distance knock them down and dead, 300 Win mag. Extreme long distance just make them dead, 6.5 Creedmoor. Medium range heart shot, 556. Getting too close, 7.62 x 39. After that you move into pistol and shotgun range. Are these the only calibers for these distance, heck no, but they are the ones that I can lay my hands on, in a hurry.
     
  10. IBME

    IBME Expert Member
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    I have a lot of 6.8 SPC chambered tools. It is actually my favorite AR-15 cartridge.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
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  11. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    The 5.56 was designed and great for jungle warfare. Most shots are in the 100 yards or less and much of the shooting is not at a clearly seen target. For much of this, the Winchester pump 12 ga was actually better but the ammo weighs a ton.

    The 9mm is now a much better choice than it used to be. Improved loads and better bullets have made it a good choice for urban or even jungle warfare. It used to be loaded as light or lighter than a 38 special but then was shot mostly from short barreled pistols and could only be had in FMJ making it a poor stopper. There were also not very many truely dependable autos back then as compared to the ones made today. Actually the Browning Highpower was the king of the hill for decades. S&W made a bunch of jamamatic 9mm pistols that jammed or stove piped way to often to bet your life on one of them.

    In the end any bullet that misses is worthless compared to any bullet that hits. If you can't shoot enough to make your bullet placement almost instinctive you are about as well of with no gun at all. At least with no gun you will feel nervous and be less likely to fight when you should run or hide. If I had little experiane with automatic weapons I would start off with a 10-22. You need to shoot it at all sorts of often moving targets until you can hit them dependably.

    My Father in law could drop a squirrel that was running out on a limb and every time it was a head shot. He was a remarkable shot. I would rather go up against someone with an M-16 than him with that 22 he shot. A human eyeball is about the size of the squirrel heads he was so good at hitting.

    you will always be better off with something that you can shoot and train with a lot. If you get a 5.56 you need to immediatly start reloading. that is the only way that you can shoot as much as you will need to without spending a medium sized fortune. 9mm are cheaper and 22LR are the cheapest.

    Once you get to the point that you can hit a fast moving target the size of about a 10" paper plate just about every time THEN you can worry about stopping power. A bullet will only stop what it hits! There are a lot of nice and not over priced 9mm carbines out there now. If you look at the cost of a GOOD AR and the price of a thousand rounds and compare it to a 9MM carbine and a thousand rounds I think the price difference will allow you to shoot a lot more with the 9mm and it is allowed in places where the 5.56 in a rifle are not safe or allowed.
     
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  12. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Medium distance, 6.8 SPC
    Long distance, .338 Lupua
    Extreme long distance, hand-loaded .50 Browning

    5.56 x 45 NATO = varmint

    It takes power and a bullet heavier than 90/100 grains to kill. People use cover unless they are brain damaged.

    Soldiers are often in vehicles or behind the walls of buildings. Gotta shoot through that.
     
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