Are You A Casual Prepper? If So, What Have You Done So Far?

Discussion in 'Newbie Corner' started by greymanila, Jul 10, 2017.

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  1. greymanila

    greymanila Active Member
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    Honestly, I'm more of a part-time prepper. I can't imagine myself living in the boondocks, living off the grid. I also am hooked to the trappings of modern society.

    I need my BigMac! I need internet! I need to watch Game of Thrones!

    BUT...I do prep...a little at a time...

    I've started making my go bag, reinforcing our house, buying food stocks...

    What about you guys?
     
  2. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    No I am not a casual prepper. If you can't even imagine living in the bush, you would have a hard time surviving. Just so long as you do not become a problem for those of us who take survival seriously.
    Keith.
     
  3. greymanila

    greymanila Active Member
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    How long have you been living in the bush?
     
  4. greymanila

    greymanila Active Member
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    Prepping is such a big lifetime change. Some of us need to take baby steps before diving completely in.
     
  5. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    20 years in the country in the UK & about 46 years in the bush here in Australia.
    Keith.
     
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  6. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I understand that, but you don't want to get caught on one leg, & it does not take any effort or money to start THINKING seriously about survival. These are very uncertain times. We could be hit by a comet tomorrow, as quick as that. Our lives can be changed over night by so many situations.
    Keith.
     
  7. greymanila

    greymanila Active Member
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    So, that's about 66 years waiting for the Apocalypse? With all due respect,... ahem...wouldn't your time have been spent on better things?
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I was brought up by WW2 era parents, no supermarkets back then, no internet, no mobile phones, you knew and could rely on your neighbours even in a city suburb. my parents would have been called preppers(most people were-you couldn't afford to run out of stuff the shops shut at 5 or 6pm and were closed on sundays), the word didn't exist back then.
    fast forward 50 years, we have "just in time" food deliveries, wars all over the world, climate change, prepping is needed even more than before, most of the population have no skills or knowledge other than those they earn their living with, they don't even know where their food comes from and are wedded to "best before" dates.
     
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  9. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    G
    Good post.
    Keith.
     
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  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    you may NEED these things now, but can you live without them, in a serious catastrophe-dosent have to be the apocalypse plenty of things can stop these things working without it being the end times.
    sounds like someone hedging their bets, not quite ready to commit wholely.
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  11. greymanila

    greymanila Active Member
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    Well, a little at a time.

    I've experienced Martial Law, a revolution, several coup de tats, two bombings a few meters from my office, my house has been flooded waist deep twice and hit by near Haiyan strength typhoons several times, I've lived through a severe earthquake, and a massive volcanic eruption.

    So, yes, I've gotten a taste of what calamity feels like. I guess I should be grateful I'm still alive!
     
  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    and having experienced all these things your still a PART TIME prepper???
    just what does it take to convince someone like you?
     
  13. greymanila

    greymanila Active Member
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    My parents were also from the war. My dad was a guerilla fighting the Japanese. My mother had to watch over my elder siblings as they fled, as the Japanese burned their village. She had to brave the fires and soldiers to gather whatever resources she could get. They hid neck deep swamps as the Japanese searched for them. And when the Japanese soldiers left, they had to subsist on what they could forage.

    So yes, my parents were kinda preppers too... because of necessity.
     
  14. greymanila

    greymanila Active Member
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    Ha, ha, ha, sound crazy doesn't it?

    Well, the thing is, our country is really known for having many calamities. We're the second most hit country in the world. And so, I guess in a sense, we were always 'prepared'. It's just that we only prepare optimally. We stock an optimal amount of food if we need to survive for three days. We stock an optimal number of guns and weapons just to scare off potential threats. We take certain precautions like keeping some funds in another country just in case we need to leave our own. We have another house in a farther location just in case our house or neighborhood becomes unliveable.

    So, I think so far, my part-time prepping has kept me alive!

    But honestly, things are a-changing....and new preparations need to be done...
     
  15. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    yes, that's what I think too, things are much more on a knife edge than at any time since WW2.
     
  16. omegaman

    omegaman Expert Member
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    I stock up on stuff quite alot. But not only for when the zombies get here from space but mostly for stuff like snowstorms, long term illness, broken legs, you know, normal stuff. I live very far from any stores or anything. My wife comes from a war torn country so shes been prepping since we came here. Meds and food. A generator is a must when you live here also (if you want power).
    I am a HAM operator, wich by some is seen as a prep in itself.
     
  17. Ken S LaTrans

    Ken S LaTrans Active Member
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    I don't consider myself a "doomsday" prepper, but more of a "grandson of the depression era". My grandparents went through the Great Depression, and I learned from them first not to waste and to repair rather than throw away. I remember my grandma and our cook, Maria, always canning and preserving, and "putting by".

    So, it just kind of came with growing up living and working on the family ranch. I don't remember ever buying beef, pork, chicken, turkey, veggies, or really much of any food at the store. There were some canned goods that you can't raise in AZ, but for the most part everything came from the ranch, Grandma's garden, and via trading beef with the pig farmer down the road and at the Presott Farmer's Market.

    Then, when I left to go to college in Tucson...it was a whole new world in a lot of ways. Then, I got married, went to the academy, had my son and I became a "consumer". My wife was a city girl, had no idea how to do anything when we went home to Prescott...it was culture shock for her like it was for me going to the city.

    Anyway, my first wife passed away when my son was only 2. I was left with a kid, a mortgage, and really scraping by on overtime, moonlight jobs, and buying and selling guns, doing gunsmith work...you name it.

    Then, 15 years ago I got remarried. My wife, who was raised dirt poor, was in her surgical internship at a university hospital. She made less than minimum wage...but in the years I had been a single dad I started buying food at warehouse stores, growing a small garden, learning to do canning by myself. Obviously, I never ran short of beef, pork, or chicken because Grandma and Pap saw that I was well set there. The thing I realized is that I had become a prepper "against hard times".

    After my wife finished her internship and began her surgical residency things eased up a little but I still kept up with the bargain hunting, shopping, buying, selling, trading, etc. I became friendly with some LDS neighbors who followed the 2 year supply of everything model of their faith (No, I am not LDS), but I learned a lot from them.

    Fast forward six years, and my wife had completed her residency and surgical fellowship (she's a trauma surgeon), and things eased up considerably. We found 100 acres out here about five miles from the middle of nowhere with good features and a few government surplus surprises and built the house we wanted. We did solar, (I have been experimenting to varying degrees of success with wind...I can make toast via wind power...lol), but I was able to financially support a lifestyle where I can take advantage of deals on long term storage foods, military MREs in bulk, et cetera.

    So...hell...I guess I am not a casual prepper, but I have been fortunate enough to be able to purchase most of the preps we have in place. BUT...those things I can do here on this property I have done. I have sunk 2 wells with wind pumps, identified other water sources, improved the government surplus surprise into something useful, and worked hard to make our home as independent from the power grid as possible. We are connected, but if we come to a time when we're not...we will be okay. We will simply move to the basement.

    My skills though are more of a LE nature. I am an armorer, reloader, extremely active competitive shooter and trainer.
     
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  18. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    nothing "casual" about me brother! i'm an all or nothing kind of guy.;)
     
  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Honestly I'm not sure that I'm really a prepper at all in the roughest sense of the word. Basically I was raised with the attitude that part of being a man was to always be able to take care of my loved ones. My Dad was big on this and wanted me to be familiar with the old ways of doing things. He often told me that you didn't want to be totally dependent on electricity or modern conveniences because they can fail you.

    We always have had our hurricane gear and plenty of food ready to go. In the early 70s I actually thought that we were going to have a civil war and got involved with a militia of sorts. That got me interested in guns past just a few for hunting. I eventually went into business with a couple of partners and got a FFL and sold guns for a number of years. I also did a lot of gunsmith work.

    As time passed I guess I just considered having a lot of food in the house and learning how to do everything for myself was just the way I lived. I'm lucky in that I can learn things pretty easily. Eventually this led to me having my own business fixing things. I can fix nearly anything that is in a home, restaurant, motel, machine shop or factory plus have worked as a diesel and gasoline car mechanic. I've built houses, poured and repaired slabs for homes and am a master machinist able to draw the prints pick the metal and carry it through all the way to completion on any machine in any shop.

    I have "kits" in every vehicle incase something happens when I'm away from home and my place is made up of two houses, three separate shops and two two car carports that are work sheds. One is a machine type shop with a metal lathe, milling machine, drill press, table saw, bandsaw, planer, compound slide miter saw, Wood lathe, router table, belt sanders and grinders. I also have a stick welder, tig welder and an oxy acetylene rigs in this shop. It also has a huge Kennedy roll around with a box, sub box and side box full of my mechanic and machinist tools and instruments.

    The second shop is set up for reloading, fly tying, leather work, wood carving, knife making and fishing stuff. The third shop is mostly my wifes craft shop with a drill press, chop saw, scroll saw and painting stuff. and stuff for refinishing furniture.

    I have tried to gather as many of the old tools as possible that are not dependent on power. I do these things because I like to make things and I like being self sufficient. I've always been this way. I'm a Texan and we are a pretty hardy lot and a lot of this is sort of normal for a lot of us.
     
  20. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    You think my time would have been better spent living in the city???!!! I have been living the life I enjoy most, & I have not been waiting for an Apocalypse. It is more a matter of taking control of your life, & living it to the full as much as is possible. I have more freedom out here, better air to breath, I grow my own food so I know where it comes from. No, my time has not been wasted.
    Keith.
     
  21. Travis.s

    Travis.s Well-Known Member
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    One can be prepared for calamitys and still live your life but you do need to ask your self if you have the resolve to abandon what your comfortable with in order for you and your loved ones too survive.
    As for me I too love in a city and I understand that the luxury of such a life can be hard to let go (I enjoy my ps4 and my netflix) but I am prepared and willing to leave it and live with out it if need be.
    I haven't experienced all of what you all may have but the value of being ready for as much as you can be and not need it is better than not having anything and needing it.
    I also prepare for simple things like week long power outages and the like by stocking bottled water, preserved food, a small cooker that dosen't need power or fuel, flashlights and warm clothing all of these thing can be useful for any situation. And you can even buy small magnetic generator that can charge your phone. You don't have to give up your lifestyle at the first sign of trouble but you should be ready too.
    By failing to prepare you are preparing to fail. Benjamin Franklin.
    You don't have to live in the woods but keeping a bottle of water and a few granola bars in your fridge doesn't count as being prepared in any way if that's all you have for your plans I implore you too take extra steps and ask your self what is really important your comfortable lifestyle or your and your loved ones life?.
    Trust me it can be easier then you think to be ready there are plenty of options out there too prepare.
    Good health and best of luck.
     
  22. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I think your preaching to the already converted!!:)
     
  23. Travis.s

    Travis.s Well-Known Member
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    It's good just to have it out there
     
  24. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    its already been done probably several times but it wont hurt to repeat it.
     
  25. Salty

    Salty New Member
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    I'm no SuperPrepperSurvivalistNinja™, but I wouldn't say I am a casual prepper...
     
  26. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I think the reason that I have never cared for the term "prepper" is that it seems to infer a sort of obsessive and fearful way of living. I just don't look at what I do that way and if it wasn't mostly a pleasure I would have probably stopped doing most of the things that I do a long time ago. I don't think Kieth is living in the bush because he is afraid. I bet he is there because he loves it and the special closeness you get when you live WITH nature instead of trying to terraform it into a place that you just live IN. I like having wild life around me. It isn't always convenient. Going to get pizza is a 40 mile round trip to town and delivery is just not going to happen.

    Each person has their own priorities, needs and wants. Big houses, new fancy cars and trucks and the big city lifestyle are not on my list of important things. For me the things that others call prepping is for me, just the way I like to live. I like to hunt, fish and camp. I like to have a lot of food on hand just incase and always have been this way. I like guns, knives, swords axes and tools. I like making things with my hands and would rather repair and fix up an older then than buy new ones.

    If it isn't fun you need to reevaluate what you are doing. I learned from watching others that prepping for a possible tomorrow is useless if you don't enjoy today. My Dad worked hard all his life with the intention of being able to retire and enjoy himself later in life. You might say he prepped for retirement. Instead he got parkinson's and died.

    If I live to see the end of this world I am pretty ready to live through it and come out the other side alive and happy. If on the other hand I die tomorrow I have no regrets and have had a great time doing the things that gave me pleasure. Prepping for the future should not be such an obsession that it makes you unhappy now. Now is all that you are sure of having. Enjoy today so that if your preparations for tomorrow don't go as you planned you still have no regrets.
     
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