Backyard Gardening?

Discussion in 'Farming' started by Okaviator, Jul 12, 2017.

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  1. Okaviator

    Okaviator Member
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    i actually want to see how many of you guys out there have backyard gardens. This can actually be a really efficient way to save money. Instead of spending money on watering your lawn, spend your money on watering a garden that actually produces something of value. Hopefully this got you guys brainstorming. Cheers!
     
  2. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    OK, so Old Geezer is a backyard gardener. Click +1

    A backyard garden often isn't about saving money. We bought this place a year ago and didn't bust the ground year one due to having all manner of moving issues and interior work to do. This year I busted ground and prepared a growing area. Boys and girls, that is work and it ain't cheap. Growing a garden is about having more security in the realm of food. If a disaster goes down, grocery stores get cleaned out and in a hurry. Therefore one must store food and grow their own food. And oh by the by, fresh vegetables taste better and still have their nutrients intact.

    Everyone, and I do mean everyone, in my family raised gardens or had a small farm (grew food to sell and/or give extras to family). Everyone hunted game or raised meat animals/birds. In my youth, I never knew anyone, male or female, who hadn't personally killed birds and animals for food. My father's mother (born just before 1900; her husband, my Pap, was born just after 1890, he was my best friend when I was a child) perpetually canned fruits and vegetables. In her dirt basement, she had shelves and shelves and shelves of canned vegetables -- any kind you can think of. At the end of the growing season, she let sauerkraut "work" on the screened-in back porch then canned the procedes. We picked blackberries and she made dozens of jars of jams and jellies. We picked herbs for teas and medicines -- these and peppers were always strung up on the back porch drying. Both of my grandfathers would bring home critters they'd shot for supper. My dad's dad was a dynamite shot and would stick his revolver out his car window to kill rabbits and squirrels -- all head shots, so as not to ruin any meat. My mom's dad always killed with a shotgun and liked to eat the squirrels' brains. One fries the squirrel with head still attached, then you crack its head open with a spoon and suck out its brains. Me, I loved squirrel gravy and used a 20 ga pretty much exclusively (doesn't blow a critter to bits).

    A topic you may be interested in, may already may be familiar with, but I'm sending a few links anyway -- you are under 20; I am over 60, so I don't know where younger people are coming from / don't know what you are being taught or not being taught these days -- concerning the, "The Victory Garden". If interested in gardens, you need to understand this topic. So here is some information readily available on the web:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victory_garden

    http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe40s/crops_02.html

    http://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/americas-patriotic-victory-gardens
     
  3. blade_foxhollow

    blade_foxhollow Well-Known Member
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    Sir geezer. I would like to point you in the direction of mini farming. Mr. Markham who wrote the books has some excellent information in his books that can help you farm and to keep the cost minimal. This is where I am currently trying to gain some of my information from.
     
  4. Kootenay prepper

    Kootenay prepper Expert Member
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    There is more then just burying some seeds in the ground and putting water on them and hoping for them to grow. Start with the soil by testing it as you can get the small testers for very cheap to check for acidity. Take advantage of your produce waste and leaves by starting a compost. Research the plants you are hoping to grow as some will benefit others and some can stunt other plants growth. You need to learn your growing zones as some will not have enough growing days to support certain plants.
     
  5. Crys B.

    Crys B. Member
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    With my health, I can't really garden like I used to when I was a kid. But, when I was a kid, I used to grow tomatoes.

    I would argue that garden produced fruits and vegetables are probably going to be more nutritious than what you would get ina store.
     
  6. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    I grow tomatoes, Peppers, Mint, Stevia, and herbs mostly in pots and then my kids have several garden areas where there are all sorts of things grown. In total we have between a quarter and a half an acre in plants.
     
  7. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    This year's garden out-produced last years ... by a lot ... by a whole lot. We are now drying, freezing, canning, ... . We've sliced, shredded, grated, you name it, to put it back.

    Cocozelle zucchini massively over-produced, however it tastes great. Great fried & great for making bread.

    The tomatoes have been turned into spaghetti sauce and preserved in jars. This isn't really to be stored a long time ... we really like spaghetti.

    Even the onions did well and we're not wizards at growing onions. Peppers did great. I like banana peppers, however we put out hot peppers this year. These we'll pickle.

    From local farm & garden I bought a bunch of Coast of Maine, "Bumper Crop Soil Builder". Plus before starting the season, I turned the soil with a bunch of grub killer mixed in. Dried horse manure is always a benefit.
    https://coastofmaine.com/product/bumpercrop/
     
  8. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    My health this year pretty much precluded me doing much gardening.
     
  9. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    I got our garden put out, then another region of my skeleton blew-up. Surgery. Massive rebuilding.

    Poor wife! My body coming apart is NOT fair to her. Her health leaves a lot to be desired also. My oldest son is horribly crippled.

    I could come back from all of this. My braces help very, very much. Last I mowed, I was wearing three braces to hold me together. Now things are now much worse. Mr. Surgeon has lots of confidence in himself. If I live another decade, I will be utterly shocked.
     
  10. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    I'm having a problem with pernicious anemia. That makes it hard because without enough iron your blood loses its ability to carry oxygen or nutrition to the cells and organs. I'm doing a lot better now and am getting iron in transfusions. Did you know that iron costs about the same per ounce as GOLD??? It is running about 1500 dollars an ounce. I will say this though it is like the fountain of youth! I've had two infusions and two more to go and I'm ready to wrestle alligators! Great stuff.
     
  11. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Your body has to have a protein called intrinsic factor to absorb vit B12. Autoimmune disease can result in attacks on this intrinsic factor.

    Autoimmune disease has played hell with my grandfather, my dad and his brothers, with me, and with my adult children still living. We are talking severe, life-threatening stuff here. Of course, I don't have to tell you, TexDanm anything. Autoimmune disorder was part of that which took my daughter's life.

    I deeply hate having to put up with living in this world. Hopefully things will be better on the other side of death.
     
  12. arctic bill

    arctic bill Well-Known Member
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    I had a backyard garden for 15 years, it was fun i learned a lot. one day in september i went in to the grocery store and they had on sale 5 for five. in other words you would get a bag of each of the following, onions, potatoes, turnips, carrots, beets. for five dollars. it was just so much easier to buy the stuff than grow it. like the other old guys i stopped doing it.
     
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