Big Pig

Discussion in 'The Hangout' started by TexDanm, Feb 22, 2020.

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  1. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    Well so much for using the 7.62 x 39 for hog hunting. I think I will be headed to the 308. That is one big oinker.
     
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  3. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I'm with you for hogs that size I want some serious knockdown power. around here they hunt them a lot with 5.56 assault rifles. they don't want to eat them they just want them dead and the 5.56 will let them run off to die so you don't have to drag the bodies off and away from the deer feeders or out of your yard. Most of the hogs around here run to about 200 pounds. South of us some idiot released some Russian boars and those suckers have bred with our piney woods rooters and made a much bigger and meaner hog. Eventually, they will spread to here but not yet. Hog killing has become a year-round sport for families... AND their numbers are GROWING. Some places are hiring exterminators to kill them to thin them out of the woodland subdivisions.
     
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  4. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    For huge hawgs, I'd go .308 or equivalent energy, with a 180 gr bullet -- round nose for close, spire point for distance. I've got an M98 Mauser re-barrelled in .308 / 7.62 NATO sitting right behind me now (bolt is locked in quick-access safe, electronic, beside me). It's loaded with round-nose 180 grainers. Bears come down out the mountains -- I'd hate to have to nuke one, me, I'm a bear myself. Too, city gang bangers show up in old 4-door land yachts -- big thick doors & large block engines. Had a home invasion by gang-bangers just down the road from me last week (drug trade savagery). A .308 will bust the engine block side & thus the water-jacket of an iron 5.7 liter V8. My folk busted truck blocks when organized crime was dumping New Jersey toxic waste in their Tennessee hollar landfill. Yankee drivers got all de-motivated when the locals started assassinating their trucks while they were driving them. Engine block now -- driver next.

    But then there are not-so-huge pigs and a whole lot of them. Were I living where there was a serious overpopulation of these pigs, I could be convinced to purchase a semi-auto rifle for the job. Seems like an AR-15 would be all that could get you the death count necessary to semi-control these things. I've seen video of several hogs killed simultaneously with buckshot; however, the shooter was right up on top of them, like 10-20 yards. Buckshot peters-out quickly.

    A Texas game official recently said, "We are not going to be able to BBQ our way out of this situation." They are having to poison pigs and even that is falling short. Poison also causes all manner of problems -- must be used by folk who are super aware of procedure and dosing; there's a lot to this. I'd be afraid to use poison lest it kill other animals, animals natural to the land. These hawgs ain't natural.

    Netting and then killing several at a time, I think would prove effective. But how many folk and agencies have this sort of netting equipment? Couldn't be a whole lot.

    There are lots of videos online that show & describe which rifles and techniques have worked for other people. Great watching. I recommend these videos.
     
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  5. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I've built a couple of pig traps by welding stock panels onto a welded frame. They are 4'X4' X 8' and will usually catch several small ones at a time. A lot of the people that have deer leases hunt over feeders and on a good day may kill several. They want to kill as many as possible before deer season so the hogs won't tear down the feeders and run the deer off.
     
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  6. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    I have a great long distance bolt rifle. My 6.5 Creedmoor is a tack driver but is to slow for wild pig hunting. One maybe two shots and the piggies are gone over hill and dale. I don't do "Over Hill and Dale", no wind power left in my sails. If I go for the wild pig hunt, I am going to assemble me a nice inexpensive (cheap, cheap) AR10 rifle. I have looked at the PSA gen 3 Upper receiver (20 inch barrel) and the stripped PSA gen 3 lower receiver. I will use a Rise Armament flat blade sporting trigger --- my current Rise trigger (same model) is rated 3.5 pound trigger pull but is actually 2.25 to 2.5 pound trigger pull. I will go with the ATI butt stock (just purchased one and got very poor shipping / delivery time and poor customer updates) with extra thick recoil pad and cheek riser. I love the ATI products but I am still irritated with the company shipping and follow up. I purchased these exact same items in the past and got excellent service, so I will hope they return to their past ways.
     
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  7. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    I know wild pigs have been a problem for some time, in many states. They are smart, incredibly destructive to crops and the land, and they are prolific breeders. This link gives some details.

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/a-plague-of-pigs-in-texas-73769069/

    Anybody who releases pigs into the wild should be tarred and feathered, and made to pay retribution for all the damage they will cause.
     
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  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    wild pigs known here as wild boar in the past were wiped out by over hunting, some were released by the animal liberation nutters from farms and now they are prolific in the wild, not just Devon but all over the UK, they can make a mess of farm land and domestic lawns but are rarely seen.
     
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  9. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    In the far past it was common for people to release pigs on islands or anyplace that a ship might land to resupply its freshwater reserves and gather some meat. It also was common in the early days to allow a lot of livestock to free-range and you only gathered them in for butchering when you would pen them and feed them for a while to fatten them up before butchering. I think that in the past there were enough wolves, bears and big cats around to keep the populations under control. Over time as we settle more and more land for farming we killed off those predators. The many rural people replaced the predators.

    As we moved to a more totally urban society those controls were gone and now the hogs are basically the top of the food chain. normally the top of the food chain is a predator. Their population is controlled by the simple fact that if they become too numerous they kill out their prey and starve to death. Hogs, on the other hand, are omnivorous and have an almost endless food supply.

    I think that they need to do them as they did the wolves and but a Bounty on them. It worked on the wolves and it worked on the nutria rats. Give a guy 10 buck apiece for a dead pig and they will thin out in a hurry. Personally I think that we ought to start catching them and shipping them as meat to other countries. Give the bounty hunter 1o bucks then process and sell the meat for a break-even deal. Turn those critters into sausage.
     
  10. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    "The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimated that approximately 815 million people of the 7.6 billion people, or 10.7 percent of the world's population suffered from "chronic undernourishment" in 2016, the last data publicly available."

    We need to feed them pork!!!
     
  11. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
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    I personally will go with 7.92 Mauser for that although I also love .308 Win
     
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  12. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I think that the 7.62X54R Nagant that I have a couple of huge sardine cans of ammo for might be sort of fun. For hunting them in the brush a lot of people like the 44 mag lever-action rifles. In the brush and up close you want something that will put a big hole in them. The BEST hog gun of all times was a Ruger 44 mag auto that was built a lot like the 10-22 rifle.
     
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  13. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Not that far in the past. My people would turn hawgs out -- especially before 1917-ish. In 1917 came the American Chestnut blight wiping-out those trees. That was an apocalypse for my people. Chestnuts made-up the better part of the forest mast. Hawgs couldn't feed as well. Wild hawg was a staple of the dinner table. I've got stories about my maternal great-paw killing these critters. Once during a winter he killed one up on a mountain bald, field-dressed it, and rode the thing down the snowy mountain like a sleigh! Yeeeeee-haaaaawwwww!!!! Those folk were using muzzle-loaders well into the 20th century due to not having the money to buy cartridge rifles. They were beyond poor.

    Sometimes my kin would kill bear. Bear renderings and hard tallow made for a great black power firearm grease. When frying bear meat, all the dawgs in the hollar will go bat-sh## crazy once they get a whiff of that bear smoke. My great grandpaw carried a hawg-leg revolver (percussion cap) -- even while plowing. Seems he was in a feud with his brother-in-law. That Pap-pap of mine lived to be old. He was mean. After loading your cylinders, you gotta put grease over each ball, otherwise these revolvers can chain-fire.

    For sport hunting, rich folk like the Vanderbilt family turned-out Russian boar = razor backs. These Russian monsters mated with the domestic hawgs and you got a mixed breed. To this day, you'll see these mixed breed piggies. Can see a razor back with Poland China colors. Forestry Service hates wild hawgs. As a young man back in the early '70s, I worked a summer with the Forestry Service and, oh lord, did they ever hate the wild pigs.

    These aren't a natural species and should now be wiped-out. I feel terrible about what is happening down in Texas. Sounds like TexDanm has a good idea in welding those pig traps. And not letting the meat go to waste is a great thing also.
     
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  14. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Bear renderings and bees-wax -- that's the best black powder grease. I'd forgotten using the bees-wax. Just came to me.

    I still have my pap's powder horn. As a boy found a percussion cap tin at his house. He kept the powder horn hanging on the wall. When he finally took a regular job, he was able to buy a breech-loading shotgun. Same for his dad, he was able to buy a breech-loader before he died. Pap bought a 12 ga. and his dad bought a 10 ga. "All that fancy city goin's-on and such!"
     
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  15. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    It's got the power if you place your shot well.
    Lots of people use .223's
     
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  16. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    223 is fine for sitting in a stand and shooting hogs. It kills them but not fast and they run off to die. I know a lot of people that use ARs in that caliber but they are just interested in KILLING the dam pigs and don't want them for meat and don't want to have to drag them off. If you are on the ground in a place where you can't see very far you definitely want something better than a 22 for a big pig. I have seen a 223 bounce off the skull of a big boar.

    It is astounding what a herd of pigs can do to even something as simple as a lawn overnight. They did a friend's lawn and yard one night and it was about a half-acre and it looked like it had been plowed for planting! They wiped out his wife's prize daylilies and she was PISSED! They will turn a garden upside down in a couple of hours and all your work is gone.
     
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  17. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    I know shot placement is important if not critical, but I would opt for the 45-70 lever action. I wouldn't want to take any chances knocking down one of those monsters.
     
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  18. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Yeah....the Hawaiian islands is one of the places wherein the Hogs have run loose over the years and they are tearing up the brush and much of the in ground nesting sites for many of the local animals. They are very destructive in this manner.

    The natives hunt them with modern firearms and the more physically fit and daring the olde ways with spears....and dogs.

    They like to come down the mountains into the Macadamia nut areas and eat the nuts which have fallen.

    On my Fathers side of the family they will hunt them and do a Luau...the olde ways.

    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    In Texas running hogs with dogs has about replaced coon hunting. LOL, some of those hog dogs are about as scary as the hogs!!!
     
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  20. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Wow....45-70...that's a big one up close...hard hitting. But it may be what is called for with some of the pigs.

    I recall seeing a video of a fellow who shot a .308 with special subsonic ammo..to hunt pigs.

    The bolt action rifle and barrel had been custom modified into a silencer and he shot from within 100 yards. The pigs did not panic or scatter and some of them did not realize one or two of them had fallen....they just kept eating from the feeder site.

    That was quite impressive....but I am sure expensive for the custom rifle and the accompanying paper work.

    No doubt it worked.

    I suspect that over time ...the wild pigs will be breeding and migrating their way up here to Virginia from places south...at the rate they are breeding. This could be a problem.

    Already many areas are seeing a significant increase of Coyotes. Also ..as I recall....they are reintroducing wolves into the western part of the state...to the ire of many farmers.

    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  21. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Have a Henry Lever Rifle in .41 magnum....thinking it may not be sufficient for a hog that size.

    .45-70 ...no doubt about it. You need a deep penetrating and then expanding bullet to deliver such serious energy.

    Big boned...thick skinned critters.

    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  22. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    Yes, shot placement is required but since I don't believe in giving my opponent (two legged or four legged) an even chance, I would be going for the 308. The 45 /70 has too much recoil for me. 308 is about as big a caliber as I care to shoot. It has serious energy and fair range. Good close up and out to a reasonable distance. I don't want to hunt pack animals or critters with bigger teeth than me, with a bolt rifle.
     
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  23. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I think your 41 would work really well actually. It was conceived as a people stopper for the police but the whiny limp wristed wimps thought the recoil was excessive. The old 45-70 will stop anything on the North American continent. It was a buffalo stopper. They used to shoot them from amazing distances and would do as you mentioned with the silenced rifle. As long as the shots dropped the buffalo clean they would just stand there and let the hunters kill them one after another.
     
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  24. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Texdanm and others..

    The 45-70 is a big big bullet...both in diameter as well as weight in grams.

    Seems to me bullet weight for factory ammo is around 300 grains or better...that is a lot of lead and energy delivered even in subsonic velocities.

    This kind of thing along with black powder muzzle loading taught me that hyper velocity is not everything..in shooting.

    Come to think of it …..the 45-70 certainly goes back to the black powder days....and still survives.

    It is indeed a Mule...on both ends.

    But that is a big big pig...thick skinned and big boned...

    I do have some extra heavy cast lead gas checks for my .41 Magnum with just such wildlife in mind.....big boned and thick skinned...some 250 grains of cast lead with a gas check. Standard load is about 210 grains.....but.....

    Still that is a big big pig.....

    I was surprised to find in certain videos that such pigs can move fast when properly motivated..they can cover some ground quickly.

    A pig that big and with an attitude.....Wow!!!!


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris

    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  25. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    With boar, anyone have experience using slugs out a rifle-barrelled shotgun?
     
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  26. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Boar have a gristle-plate, also called a "shield", that covers part of their neck and then goes back over their shoulders, and down to their forelegs. I takes a heavy bullet to stay intact through that evolutionary armor plate and then dump its energy in the boiler-works.

    https://www.biggamehunt.net/tips/what-about-shield

    https://fmgpublications.com/big-bores-for-big-bores/

    Think of these critters as being hideous demons that gnawed their way out of Satan's rear end down in the bowels of Hell.
     
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  27. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I've seen a BIG Black Russian Boar put on a burst of speed crossing a highway and it looked almost like a gazelle going across that road. This one looked almost pure Russian with big shoulders and lower in the hindquarters it basically only hit on the road once as it bounded across. They are rather amazing critters and probably would be admirable hunting prey if they just weren't so dammed destructive and prolific breeders. The breeding part you can probably blame on people. the domestic side of the feral hogs were bred to produce big litters and do it often while the wild boar was much less productive of offspring.
     
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  28. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I know12 gauge oo buckshot works and I can't imagine a slug failing to get the job done.

    ""Shotgun slugs (12 gauge) achieve typical velocities of approximately 1800 fps for 1-oz. (437.5 grain) slugs, for an energy of over 3,100 ft-lbs (4200 J). In contrast, a .30-06 bullet weighing 150 grains at a velocity of 2600 fps achieves an energy of 2,250 ft-lbs (3051 J)""

    Just for a comparison
    ""The 325 grain bullet has an advertised muzzle velocity of 2050 feet per second and a muzzle energy of 3032 foot pounds. Buffalo Bore produces one of the hottest .45-70 loads available with a 405 grain jacketed flat nose bullet propelled at 2000 feet per second for a tooth rattling 3597 foot pounds of muzzle energy.""

    ""The standard .44 Magnum bullet weights 240 grain (gr), travels at a velocity of 1,350 feet per second (fps), and generates a muzzle energy of 971 foot pound energy (ft·lbs). It features a .429-inch lead bullet that sits in a straight-walled case that is 1.285 inches long.""

    ""Typical factory ammo for a .30-30 in a 170 gr bullet lists a muzzle velocity of abt 2200 fps and 1827 ft lbs of muzzle energy. People tend to use these figures as a performance reference for the .30-30, although the numbers are from a 24" bbl. Most .30-30's, however, come in in a 20" bbl.""
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2020
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