Coffee Brand

Discussion in 'Food Storage - Canning/Freezing/Butchering/Prep' started by poltiregist, Nov 2, 2020.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I am looking for a recommendation . I have several months supply of ground coffee on hand but want to store up some whole bean coffee that I can grind up to enjoy . The only local store that I am aware that had such coffee has now went under . I will likely order several months supply via computer either late tonight or early in the morning . Do any of you have a whole coffee bean preference and recommendation ?
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  2. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
      415/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I like the Kirkland brand Columbian and Sumatra whole bean coffees. Great value.
     
    poltiregist and TMT Tactical like this.
  3. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Thanks I will look it up .
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  4. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    In this part of Texas, we have a native plant that has caffeine and can be made into a coffee substitute. Youpon holly and chicory dried and blended are supposed to make a fairly acceptable fix for a coffee and caffeine addict. Both are very common and the Holly in bush form is even used as a decorative hedge in some places. Even better I have heard that there are coffee plants now that will grow in parts of Texas. You know, if you could grow corn, sugar cane and coffee and make booze and coffee you would be a very popular person in a post-apocalyptic world.

    My Mom and dad were big-time coffee junkies and drank it from 4 in the morning until 10 at night 7 days a week. I like it and drink a big insulated mug most every morning but that is usually about it unless I am someplace and it is offered. That is a social thing here and not so much about the coffee.
     
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
  5. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Poltiregist,

    Ref: bean preference

    Let me throw into the thread the 2 basic types of bean and my philosophy on selection.

    The 2 basic beans are the:

    - arabica
    - robusta

    Arabica is the most popular. Robusta is deemed less desirable but has ~ 40+% caffine.

    As much as the caffine is a mild stimulant and excellent for Prepper needs, my view is that the coffee drink is made here as a warm to hot beverage so rather have 2 or 3 cups of arabica coffee rather than 1 cub of robusta.

    .......

    This place is loaded with coffee already in various grinds.
     
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
  6. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Actually there are many. Place like Sumatra grow wide variety of them
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  7. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Varuna,

    My key word was " basic ".
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  8. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0

    aach got it.

    So no interest in Free Roaming Civet Coffee then? Anyway around here brand doesn't matter. Its the type of the coffee that really matter
     
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
  9. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon Varuna,

    I do have some civet coffee here.

    Can't say it's free roaming because what is provided to the American market might be something cultivated. regardless of what's printed on the can.

    Was initially "fleshing out" the thread re the 2 basic beans.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  10. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      305/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I love fresh coffee but purely from a long term storage point of view I'd say store good/high quality freeze dried coffee, it has no use by date, packaging left intact it will stay good longer than the pyramids.

    I've got 20 of these packs, mylar bag with zip lock top. You can get big tubs but the smaller packs suit my needs more

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kenco-Rich-Instant-Coffee-Refill/dp/B00PK9JO9Y Not cheap but I just can't drink cheap instant coffee I'd rather drink plain water.
     
    poltiregist likes this.
  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    nothing wrong with instant coffee, I've been drinking it for the last 40 years, even drank Chicory when I was skint. dosent give the addiction of ground coffee.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  12. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Max,

    Some time ago, I was reading up and talking to some vets of the 1956 Suez "war," involving an alliance of Brit, French and Israeli forces. One story frequently mentioned was about an Israeli soldier who was known to have a sleeping bag and also 2 sheets to sleep between. I joined many in laughing about this foolishness during combat operations. It was then told to me by some veterans - the guy was well known - that he was a refugee from WWII Europe and vowed to try to have comfortable sleeping the rest of his life. This guy considered the 1956 Suez Crisis / war as a minor event compared to what he experienced as a young teen in late WWII Europe.

    Even today, with all my rudimentary living during emergencies and disasters, I plan to have a good cup of coffee - as I define "good". Coffee is a prime ingredient of my living. When leaving this shack for an emergency response or an emergency evacuation, weight permitting - and I arrange to sacrifice nice to have gadgets - I carry a coffee pot and good coffee - regular grind, espresso grind and Turkish grind.

    Also arrange to drink fresh water and avoid the R.O. ocean stuff.

    "Where one can live, one can live well." Anon.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  13. arctic bill

    arctic bill Master Survivalist
      310/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I like Maxwell house in a percolator . or Folgers.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  14. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon Arctic Bill,

    Good brand choices.

    A perculator is ideal in kit along with, in my case, an espresso pot.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  15. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      305/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Maxwell house has been around years, don't taste much like coffee but old people seem to like it, pretty much all you could get for years after WW2. Another one was Camp coffee, a mix of chicory and coffee, you can still get it, truly awful stuff

    db0ea22780eb84288377bf8e0d84bf80.jpeg

    I've had Folgers in the States but I don't think it was really marketed in the UK, Maxwell house was already established then Nescafe came along. Some of the 'new' instants from Nescafe and Kenco are pretty good to be honest. Coffee shops all over the UK now and you get some strange looks if you just order a simple coffee instead of some fartychocolardy 2 pump triple steamed shite.

    Any of you lot brew up in an Ibrik pot? Used by Turks/Greeks/Arabs, they make a mean brew :) Worth getting one or three small through large for making 'cowboy coffee' using very very fine ground beans.
     
    Ystranc likes this.
    1. Ystranc
      Yes, I like Cypriot coffee
       
      Ystranc, Apr 15, 2021
  16. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon Max,

    In reply, negative here.

    I've been served coffee from that pot. My philosophy is to use the same type of kitchen stuff I use here in the shack and when traveling for whatever reason. If an Ibrek is used by "Turk/Greek/Arabs" it wouldn't help my low profile requirements. Same thing with my demitass collection. Anything sensitive doesn't leave this place.

    Wasn't familiar with the term "cowboy coffee". The powder stuff is usually identified with "Turkish coffee". For some on and offshore rig crews, I've purchased the best of coffee appliances from the models restaurants use to real good field kitchen stuff.

    In the US, there is a coffee term "hobo coffee" - A "b" as in "BREXIT". It means making coffee with whatever coffee is available. I'm sure I'm not the only Forum Member who had this "under the bridge" creation.

    I am now in the mood for a double Americano (2 espressos served in a large container also with hot water mixed in) when socializing.

    There are MANY of those Yuppie coffee shops in D.C. and the Northern Virginia Autonomous Oblast. I just can't handle boysenberry flavored whipped cream avic some cinnamon sprinkles in an overpriced cup of liquified formaldehyde.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  17. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    I like my coffee but am not all that particular as to what brand or kind. I prefer it fresh made but have no big problem with instant. I prefer coffee made by a drip method rather than a percolator. boiled coffee is a little more bitter to me. I like it almost anyway I can get it. Black, sweet, with or without cream. I was raised drinking cajun coffee and it is very strong and black. I guess if there is anything that I just don't like it is weak pale coffee.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  18. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      305/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Cowboy coffee, course ground beans boiled in a pot, pinch of salt, let it settle and pour. The ibrik/briki pot work because the shape helps form a foam (kaimaki) on top of the coffee, no foam and a Greek/Turk/Arab won't drink it. I like my coffee full bodied and very strong so Greek or German coffee suit me best. The only 'fancy' thing I might add is some sweetened condensed milk especially when camping.

    Interesting that in Italy, milk/cream coffee is not really served or asked for much after mid morning, its seen as a breakfast coffee drink. They don't mess with coffee, very strong single or double espresso, down in one and leave, they tend not to hang around in coffee shops like many in the west do, for them it drink and go.

    I like some of the Arab teas as well.
     
  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    Cajun coffee is STRONG and sometimes has chicory in it. I always liked the Seaport extra Dark and then would make it double sweet and sometimes with cream NOT half-and-half or non-dairy creamer. In the morning that stuff will put the lead in your pencil!!!

    Some of it is so strong that it is served in little bitty demitasse cups and is like expresso. Three or four ounces is sort of like drinking three cups of regular coffee.

    Where I was raised coffee is sort of like a ritual thing and has social aspects to it. The Cajuns take their coffee very seriously and it can be quite a production. I worked with one for a while and he came in to work early every morning to make coffee for everybody. In some ways it made me think of the Japanese Tea ceremony. Every morning before work we all sat down and had our coffee together. It was really nice and started your day off right. he had a milk cow and provided fresh cream and it was just so good.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  20. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      305/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Danm, its espresso not expresso. I love coffee, dislike coffee flavored food like candy or cake.

    This morning I've been drinking strong sweet tea, had a full English breakfast so it had to be tea not coffee; bacon, 2 eggs, sausages, mushrooms, baked beans, fried bread, grilled fresh tomatoes, sliced black (blood) pudding then toast and marmalade and it was really good. Good to have maybe once a month.

    Putting up racking in the garage this afternoon, too much stuff dumped on the floor.
     
  21. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Max,

    "Cowboy coffee" sounds like a version of "hobo coffee". After making the stuff in a bot of water as close to boiling as possible, depending on the chef's skills, at end, some cold water would be poured in so the coffee grinds would sink to the bottom - in theory, at least.

    I've had real espresso made in both restaurants and grandma-made at homes in Palermo and Saracusa, Sicily when we were on contract to AGIP, Italian National Hydrocarbons Authority. Also had some traditional pizza. Looked like pizza made on an English muffin.

    My loadout always contains premium Chinese black tea (for others in group). In Chinese language, black tea is called "red tea". It is strong but about 50% less caffine than coffee.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  22. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning TexDanm,

    There is some amount of "literature" about America's coffee rituals like coffee at open of business in office type of businesses.

    You reminded me of this when mentioning the Japanese tea rituals.

    Just like customized Zippo brand lighters, the coffee mug with the advertising of a company is an aspect of America's ritual.

    All this reminds me of the earlier era of German beer steins. Some of them were elaborate.

    I am now in the mood for another espresso.........
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  23. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I have my cast iron , hand cranked grain grinder attached to my wall with a metal beam that is lag screwed into the studs inside my cedar board walls . With the grinder I normally grind up some coffee beans in the morning for that little fresher taste . The whole beans were more expensive than the ready ground but has a higher caffine content so it takes less coffee beans per cup . I have lots of coffee and coffee filters in the stash in inticipation of the collapse . Also waiting for my experimentation is 5 lbs. of a mysterious and never tried brand " white monkey " from the country of Colombia .
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  24. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    personally I will drink my instant coffee post SHTF as long as my stocks last but I,m not too bothered when I run out, its no big deal.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  25. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    My go to survival ploy is to look at what has worked for people in the past . While I certainly can survive without coffee it would be nice after washing the blood off from one of those blood and guts days , to sit back and enjoy a cup of coffee . I took a page out of the play book from the United States War between the states . They used Chicory roots as a coffee substitute . Chicory will grow over a wide expanse of the United States and into Canada as well as on the European Continent . I am sitting here drinking a coffee , chicory mix as I type this . I have ordered a couple thousand chicory seeds to start my own chicory garden come next spring . Actually I consider the seeds quite cheap " less than two dollars for 1000 seeds " . I ordered my seeds through E Bay . As a bonus to make the wife happy it produces pretty blue flowers .
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2020
    TMT Tactical and Rebecca like this.
  26. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I drank chickory when I was unemployed as it was quite cheap.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  27. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    I'm not at all picky about coffee. For me, it is a lot like tea and I will drink it any way that I can get it. If I have a pot that I've let get cold I will put it on ice just like I do with iced tea. I like it black, with sweetener or without, with creamer or without or even East Texas Cajun style with a lot of cream sugar a bit of butter, and a dash of rum. I never turn down a cup of coffee and while I prefer it to be strong and with some bite, I will still drink instant and be happy. I don't even have a brand preference but do occasionally like fresh ground and always have some beans on hand.

    My parents drank it black but my Dad would wet a spoon in the coffee and then stick it in the sugar and whatever stuck to the spoon after a gentle shake was all he needed. They drank Folgers and were hardcore about that. I didn't start drinking coffee until I was almost 40.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  28. Rebecca

    Rebecca Master Survivalist
      265/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Thanks for the good idea. Just added chicory to my next seed order. Apparently the leaves and flowers are edible too and can be added to salad or cooked like spinach.
     
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
  29. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon TexDanm,

    Folgers gets major use here. Although more expensive than the Aldi brand, the Folgers water resistent container is a Prepper's love at first sight.

    Growing up, the folks also had A & P coffee plus Maxwell House.

    If black, I can go for some East Texas Cajun stuff with rum right now.
     
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
  30. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    I was introduced to that Cajun Coffee when I worked with this older Cajun. He was a Vietnam Vet and had taken some serious damage. He couldn’t eat much at any one sitting and had to eat real often. Everything he ate was rich. In the morning before work he made “coffee” for everyone and for him this was about as serious as the Tea Ceremony would be to a Japanese person raised in that sort of culture. His coffee started off with Seaport DARK brewed as strong as possible. He then cut it with fresh real cream, double sweet, and then a dash of rum. He had a milk cow so he could have the fresh cream. He made it and served it up every morning before we started our day. We all got into the habit of coming to work early just for his coffee. It was just so rich and good that even if you were not normally a coffee drinker you would like his coffee.
     
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
  31. wally

    wally Expert Member
      173/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    ever wonder why america is a coffee nation? thank the boston tea party for that!
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  32. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Btitish tea comes from India and China, I thought the American plantations were mainly growing cotton.
     
    wally and TMT Tactical like this.
  33. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Also tobacco, Lonewolf.

    Later on the timeline with industralization getting better and bigger, cotton became prime.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  34. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    if memory serves me right werent potatoes found in America too.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  35. wally

    wally Expert Member
      173/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    what i should have said was we are a coffee drinking nation...
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  36. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    so is the UK, I think tea and coffee drinkers are about 50-50.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  37. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    For those that think they will need a trade item or two after the collapse might want to consider chicory for trade . A never ending trade item , as the plant is perennial and will regenerate itself year after year and the start up seeds are cheap . I personally can see no future need for trade but it would be nice to have for personal use and if I am wrong and did need to trade , it would be there for a trade item .
     
    TMT Tactical and Rebecca like this.
  38. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I now have a good stand of chicory , covering a 4 ft. by 20 ft. bed . Also for any coffee connoisseurs I can now recommend Coffee shipped in from the high mountains of Peru . This is not the delta area and machine grown coffee that is found in grocery stores . I am talking about remote woodland coffee that families hand pick on the mountain slopes and often pack for miles out on the back of a mule . This high altitude makes a slow growing coffee bean that is rich in flavor . I like mine shipped in green and whole bean . These they recommend storing in a breathable burlap bag . I have a burlap bag of green coffee beans hanging in my kitchen area . These will need to be roasted and then ground up in a grinder before brewing . The results to me is worth the effort for that special cup of coffee . The price of these beans ain't cheap but consider this , when they go through the roasting process in your home they will swell up to around 80% larger than when they were unroasted . This curbs a lot of the cost when you compare the price between the Peru beans and the grocery store beans . Also get a decent coffee bean roaster . I use a coffee bean roaster put out by " Nesco " and it does great . My manuel grain grinder that I have attached permanently to a corner of my walls does a good job of grinding the beans . The roaster if I lose electricity can be run off my solar power . If things warrant I can use the same equipment for processing chicory roots .
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  39. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I am not fussy about brand and I'm quite happy to drink instant coffee or tea. If you're buying ready roast vacuum sealed packs of beans they should last well but aren't particularly space efficient or value for money. You'd need to be really confident that you were stocked up on essentials before stocking up on coffee
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  40. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      305/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    An unopened jar of freeze dried coffee will last for decades. When I started laying in my supplies in March 2020 I picked up 24 tins of Kenco Rich Blend and thats a good instant coffee, suits me anyway. I got a vacuum packer and sealed up loose tea and tea bags so they should be good for a while.

    Home on dry land soon and had a dream about eating lamb curry washed down with Duval lager, a dream I look forward to acting out :)
     
  41. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    ???

    No one remembered to load out some of Varuna's new, even more improved

    " Kopi Luluck" free roaming civet coffee ?

    We can have him send us a pallet load via LAPES - Low Altitude Parachute Extraction System or NEACDS - Navy Emergency Air Cargo Delivery System.

    As soon as it gets dark here, I'll heliograph him.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  42. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    Lonewolf the thing that yoy have to realize is that the US covers a wide swath of zones from Maine that is as far north as France and then covers a lot of country before it gets to Florida, South Texas and Southern California. We have two major mountain ranges and coasts on the Atlantic, Pacific and The Gulf of Mexico and that does not even take into account Alaska and Hawaii. There are not many climates that we don’t have and so grow almost anything that you can imagine. Most of the things that we don’t grow is not grown here because it is a lot cheaper to import it than grow our own.

    Where I was raised we had tens of thousands of acres of rice. In the more northern parts of East Texas they grow corn. In the valley we have fruit trees. The panhandle in the northern part of Texas we grow wheat. In East Texas timber is a huge industry. Hunreds or thousands of acres are planted with pine trees. They come in every few years and cut some of them out to thin them so they grow better. These early cuts go to the pulp mills and then to the paper mills. By keeping them a little crowded they are forced to grow straight and tall. Any place that isn’t planted for crops is either forests for lumber or pastures for cattle. The Gulf Stream that keeps you warm makes the coastal part of Texas hot in the summer and warm in the winter. The north part is cold as hell and has snow. Just Texas alone covers a wide variation in climate and Texas is a small part of the USA.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  43. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    America is a continent, you eve n have different time zones, Britain is an island.
    whilst the North of Britain is much colder than the South it dosent have the high rainfall we have in the South, our growing season is also longer and starts earlier than in the North.
    the climate in the South West is very mild, very little snow most years but plenty of rain and sunshine which aids growing. the rural South West is mostly Agricultural with tourism around the coasts.
    we can grow a lot in Britain but coffee, bananas and other exotic fruit is not possible, of course with climate change this may be different in a few years time.
     
  44. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Don't count too heavily on large scale agriculture continuing after the fall, if artificial fertilisers aren't available most large scale mono cropping systems aren't viable. Small scale market gardening with good crop rotational practices is labour intensive even if you have access to fuel for a tiller, poly tunnels etc.
    The other issue with large scale agriculture is the need for fast transit to get your goods to market. 100 tons of grain/coffee/tabacco/bananas is no use unless you can move it to get it to market,
     
  45. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I've been saying that for years. mono cropping in Britain will not be viable after the collapse as pesticides and fertilisers are all imported. fuel wont be available as most oil is imported from the gulf states ( I know someone who worked on oil tankers) and the refineries will be closed down.
    any growing will have to be the old traditional methods, crop rotation and growing stuff which is in season.
    #with mono cropping the trace elements which humans need are no longer in the soil or in the food grown, hence the ongoing health problems #
     
  46. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      305/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Dalewick and poltiregist like this.
  47. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
  48. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Coffee Filter Manufactured For Mask Use Survival Gear May 12, 2020
Acorns; Crackers, Bread, "coffee" Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food Oct 25, 2019
Coffee Crops And Global Warming News, Current Events, and Politics Oct 11, 2019
Coffeeeee... Jokes and Humor Mar 6, 2019
Any Coffee Drinkers? Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming Jan 5, 2017
Rembrandt Being Identified, Tainted W/ Slavery News, Current Events, and Politics Feb 9, 2021
Rice Brand Changing Name, Famous Picture News, Current Events, and Politics Sep 24, 2020
Aunt Jemima Brand Leaving News, Current Events, and Politics Jun 17, 2020
Camillus #1012 Sword Brand ~ Grandpa's Old Deer Knife Knives Jul 17, 2018
Brand Name Knives? Newbie Corner Jun 5, 2017

Share This Page