Cooking By Putting The Animal In The Fire.

Discussion in 'Primitive Cooking' started by randyt, Sep 15, 2020.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
      385/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Back to that alone show LOL. The guy that won it cooked a porcupine by scorching off all the fur and quills and then roasting it in a open fire. He did this innards and all.

    I have a Ron Hood video where he travels to the Amazon and hangs out with some natives. In this video the natives cook a monkey the same way.

    I've not really seen this much, is it a common way to prepare wild game?
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  2. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I have heard of this but have personally never eaten game this way. I would want to remove the innards first if I were to ever try it. That's probably a good method of getting those damn quills out of the way.
     
    TMT Tactical, Rebecca and randyt like this.
  3. Sourdough

    Sourdough "eleutheromaniac"
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    While I personally am not a big fan of camp fires, this is because I am nearly always alone in the woods, and I am so lazy I would rather go hungry then do all the labor of making a fire.

    I have no issue with other peoples enjoyment of a camp fire. And when with others and it is "NOT" hunting oriented, but only fishing, we often cook fish not gutted, just shove a stick down the throat and roast it over the coals or open flame. Fish cooks fairly fast. Once cooked the skin just pulls off easily, then gently peel the meat off, throw the remainder into the fire.

    The only issue is you want to get the stick so it is down the middle of the fish, other wise it is near impossible to rotate the fish. The stick just spins in the fish, with the heavy part staying to the bottom. This works better with small fish.

    We giggle and call this "The Lazy Indian Cooking Style"
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2020
  4. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
      385/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I have cooked ash cakes, steaks and eggs on coals but never a animal guts and all. LOL Actually the eggs are cooked in the shell in mostly hot ashes.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  5. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I've seen it done in South America and Asia and have done a number of small and medium game animals that way. Especially things like monitor lizard, iguana, monkey, agouti and porky's. It's easy and fast and to me it seems to keep a lot more moisture in the meat than when these animals are butchered. I first saw it done and tried it at JEST in the Philippines.

    Dale
     
    randyt likes this.
  6. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    And... so.... ? :confused:

    TBH I'm confused as what you were referring at. But suffice to say I extremely doubt you want to know how I eat wild animal or what kind of animal.

    BTW monkey taste awful, unless you add a lot of spices & sauces with rice wine on top of everything
     
  7. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Varuna, If you would be so kind, please list some of the wild game that you eat and your preferred way to eat them for those not familiar with Asian wild game and cooking methods. Thank you!

    Dale
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  8. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Depend in context of the situation really.

    For really desperate situation where no other source of foods could be found (which is extremely unlikely in jungle environment) ;
    1. larvae of coconut rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros) and Termite. Eaten alive or cook using whatever means available.
    2. Grasshopper & Crickets. Typically shallow fried or whatever cooking resources available.
    When larger animal available but deep in the jungle and far from any river, than something like this might apply (albeit with regional specific variation)



    or if near civilization something like this



    In most case typical game animals such as boar, deer, fresh water fishes, root, fruits, etc are always available in jungle environment without the need for eating insect or reptile
     
    TMT Tactical and Sourdough like this.
    1. Dalewick
      Thank you. As a young soldier I was very surprised at many of the things I saw prepared and eaten in many Asian countries. 30+ years ago insects simply weren't a part of the American diet. They were a part of the Asian diet and much more frequently than most would have believed. I remember seeing items like BBQ chickens feet, BBQ lizards sold by street vendors along side of BBQ chicken or deep fried shrimp. Those experiences made me re-evaluate what I could eat. Came in handy latter in survival training.
       
      Dalewick, Sep 16, 2020
      Rebecca likes this.
  9. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon Varuna,

    Just while I'm bouncing around in my mouth a Kopiko Cappuccino candy from PT Mayora Indah, JKT, I'm reading above that you have on list larva and termites - with option to eat alive.

    Wouldn't this cause or aggrivate gastro-intestinal health problems ?
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  10. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Insects actually break down faster and better than many of the foods we commonly eat. Here is a pdf with better info. http://www.fao.org/3/i3264e/i3264e00.pdf

    Dale
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  11. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon Dale,

    Some time ago, Varuna had reported to us that he had some serious type infirmities, one being GI ailment.

    The uncooked termites and larve have parasites that won't help him get cured.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  12. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    As I had stated eating those insect alive is a desperate option, which is extremely unlikely considering the amount of foods available in jungle environment. However eating them alive is still part of the curriculum. And eating a live insect is better than not eating anything.

    Kopiko candy is no longer a thing here (no longer selling). In fact I don't remember see any of them other than in big supermarket chain for the past decade.
     
    TMT Tactical and Dalewick like this.
  13. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Varuna,

    Here, some medical and survival communities teach that even in desperate situations to avoid known dangers. It's water that might allow for risks; not food.

    A friend from Pertamina gave us some large tubes of the hard candies last month. Candy good until 2021 as per label. Even with the international travel restrictions, there are critical category exceptions. Petroleum is one of the exceptions.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Preserving Fat For Cooking Food Storage - Canning/Freezing/Butchering/Prep Friday at 8:24 AM
Cooking After Teotwawki Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food Sep 8, 2020
"frugal Cooking" Food Storage - Canning/Freezing/Butchering/Prep Jun 26, 2020
Ooni Grill;cooking Pizza Outdoors Efficient Living Jun 20, 2020
Producing Cooking Oils When Shtf Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food May 3, 2020
Lunch Warmer + Solar Panel For Cooking? Cooking and Cooking Utensils Apr 17, 2020
Quarantine Cooking Classes News, Current Events, and Politics Mar 23, 2020
Rethinking My Cooking Methods Post Teotwawki Modern Cooking Aug 22, 2019
Cooking Eggs Primitive Cooking May 28, 2019
Cooking Wild Food - Catching Snails Finding Edible Animals and Bugs Jun 27, 2018

Share This Page