Developing An Immunity to Snake Venom

Discussion in 'Animal Husbandry' started by richj8am30, Jun 15, 2016.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. richj8am30

    richj8am30 Member
      18/23

    Blog Posts:
    0

    The Psylli were a North African tribe of antiquity who were well known among other ethnicities as snake bite healers. Authentic stories in history have referred to the Psylli as being searched for by such names as Octavian to heal the likes of Queen Cleopatra who had sealed her own fate by way of snake venom. As indicated by Dio, the all male tribe of snake charmers known as the Psylli were totally insusceptible to snake bites. Psylli of North Africa were said to be so habituated to the snake bite that their spit alone could be utilized as a counter-agent to any of the venom that had befallen anyone in their camps. As a result, the Psylli’s own snake bite specialists set up to capitalize off of their fame by selling both snake poison and anti-venom in Rome. How would someone be able to have the capacity to develop such rare capabilities today?
     
  2. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
      130/140

    Blog Posts:
    0
    The Psylli are quite fascinating. But It seems that they employed some kind of selective breeding with their own male children. Thus maintaining the genetic trait in males from Psylli parents. Still, is a mystery how they manage to develop this kind of trait, I think that was by trial and (fatal) error. Thousands of years
    charming snakes would be the direct responsible of their immunity.
     
    richj8am30 likes this.
  3. jonthai

    jonthai New Member
      8/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I've seen in a documentary people that actually developed that. It was a girl from india. I find it very interesting.
     
  4. Lisa Davis

    Lisa Davis Active Member
      36/47

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I was told once that the more you are bit by a venomous snake and survive, the more immunity you have to the venom. Although, I wouldn't go getting bit on purpose to try to form some sort of immunity or anything, because naturally that would be extremely dangerous. I know someone who actually milks snakes for their venom because they use it to make anti-venom. He's been bit a few times, but only got sick from it the first few times. So, perhaps the theory is true. However, I'm not sure how serious any of his bites were and how much venom ended up in his system. Personally, I loathe snakes in general and avoid them at all costs, even if they are not venomous.
     
    richj8am30 likes this.
  5. richj8am30

    richj8am30 Member
      18/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    This is exactly what i was getting at. Today people who posses similar attributes as the Psylli might have acquired it through the pure gumption of exposure to the venom, and it in turn increased their tolerance. Except instead of having a physical snake bite them, They build up their immunity through needle injections. I even think that DC Comic's villain Bane, whose upper torso is fed an unbeknownst venom through tube connections, might have been a version of this method. The obvious reference is how the character gets stronger everytime he ups the venom's circulation through the tubes.
     
  6. OfTheEarth

    OfTheEarth Member
      18/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    There is a documentary out there of a guy that injects snake venom and looks super young but he's super old...something about developing an immunity? He does it with crazy venomous snakes too. It's wild, I'll try and find it again.
     
    richj8am30 likes this.
  7. richj8am30

    richj8am30 Member
      18/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Wow, that sounds awesome actually. Youth has to be one of the perks of snake venom. Why else would anyone prolong their use of this method in the first place? Most likely the venom deteriorates everything at such a high rate that it can even effect the genes. That is amazing.
     
  8. remnant

    remnant Expert Member
      190/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    This is a physiological aspect of the body's mechanism of conditioning involving the immune system. There is a branch of medicine that heals through exposing the body to toxins that resemble the cause of the particular disease one is suffering from ( I have forgotten the name). I think this was the basis of Psylli people immunity. So, yes, one can develop the same immunity over a long period of time through small periodic increments of exposure to venom.
     
  9. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
      230/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I don't think I would need that if I live in a area that has none. I know of certain military groups around the world that do practice anti venom practices by ingesting the venom of snakes that are indigenous to their local area. But once they go elsewhere, the species of snake change and they years of building a tolerance is worthless.
     
    richj8am30 likes this.
  10. richj8am30

    richj8am30 Member
      18/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    That is a good point. So I guess that one who hopes to become successful at using the Psylli method would have to use a variety of snake venoms. Being that we are speaking from survivalists standpoints I think that it can be of great value, especially in desert situations. If you are a traveling survivalist then I believe that you can use this method for other types of venoms, not just snakes.
     
  11. streettallest

    streettallest New Member
      6/29

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I so much hate the sight of snakes, wether living or dead. I have killed a couple of them in self defense though. There was a particular incident that happened in my farm where a snake almost entered my chicken pen. But I killed it though.
    I have watcheda recent documentory about how snake venom are harvested to produce produce snake bite medication.
     

Share This Page