Diggin Ramps

Discussion in 'Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming' started by elkhound, Apr 12, 2019.

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  1. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    digging and transplanting ramps in my forest. trying to improve my standing on many levels. restoring forest to max production.

    half bushel basket

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    planted various way in clumps and on grid in various spots in the forest.

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  2. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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  3. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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  4. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    another item i planted along creek was egyptian walking onions.they produce large nice strong tasting onions.not as large as vidalias and such.but far larger than wild ones.the produce top sets instead of a bloom and fall over and take root.hence the name walking onions.
     
  5. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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  6. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Is that the same thing that some people call "bunching onions?" I ordered some from azurestandard.com.


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  7. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    i have been planting 1 ounce of seed every winter.thats about 1500 seed. would you consider seed?
     
  8. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    I like lamb's quarters a lot, and also appreciate how long-lived the seeds are (like a gazillion years, lol). But the thing about LQ is that it is notorious for being a nitrogen accumulator, which makes it a great natural fertilizer, but can cause health issues if too much is consumed for too long. So, I try not to go crazy with it (hard not to because it tastes so good).

    I let a large patch go to seed so I have an abundant supply. I deliberately plant it in the poorest soil I can find to reduce the dietary nitrate problem.


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  9. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    no...these onions dont produce seed and they get much larger than a bunching onion.instead of a bloom on top producing seeds.they produce what looks like an onion set you plant in garden in spring time.a little bulb...they produce a clump of these and the weight of them pulls stalk over to ground and they make contact and grow up and keep repeating it..hence name walking onion.
     
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  10. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Oh my... I think I am falling in love with ramps. Here is the blurb from that link I posted earlier:

    One of the earliest woodland plants to poke out after the winter season these fresh greens have a sweet onion flavor and a garlic scent. They grow naturally under a deciduous forest canopy only to die back in the summer and remain dormant until the following spring. Flowers early summer, dropping seed to encourage naturalization.


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  11. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    I found a nice link with more ramp info (harvesting, etc.) https://www.washingtonian.com/2016/04/21/everything-you-need-to-know-ramps-dc-1789/

    Excerpt:

    The number one rule is you never forage more than 50 percent of the field. You’re also not supposed to forage before the leaves are four inches in length. When you take the baby shoots, it can do harm to future populations of ramps. Your’e really looking for at least four inches on the leaves, and a little heft to the stem. If it’s a pencil-thin stem, someone who was foraging might have pulled ramps too early. You want to make sure you leave roots behind—it really depends on the weather, but we often go in with a trenching shovel, and you can feel as you’re cutting through the roots. You want to cut the root a centimeter or two underneath the bulb. The little bit of root you leave behind will regerminate, and get ready for the following spring.


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  12. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    they actually are a leek...some expert say a leek other say its garlic... they bulb up right before leaves come out on trees and just as leaves pop out.they grow about 30 days to store energy and then they drop leaves and only bloom remains producing its seed pod. you can eat entire plant. theres 2 kinds as well. the one i posted link to is large leaf one.theres a smaller leaf one that i am told is not as good tasting.

    grizzgal since you are interested i will hunt you up the best info on internet about these and post it here.might take me a bit but its good info...and a webinar.



    var. tricoccum

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  13. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Is it true that animals don't seem to bother it because of the garlicky smell?


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  14. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    i have had deer bit off some of the blooms is all...as far as i can tell with leaves only being on for a short time.
     
  15. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    heres a clump of walking onions and some singles i had to plant

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    planted out



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    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
  16. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Ok, I will prepare for that...and likely get TWO crops from my ramp patch: ramps and deer.

    I am sure I can prepare both in the same pot, too.

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  17. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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  18. elkhound

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  19. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    this is long webinar..its worth listening to

     
  20. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Thank you!!!!!!!!!!


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  21. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    these things grow slow but once established you wont be without them.small patches can be over harvested real easy.

    p.s. in picture you see a trowel...it was a job harvesting with it.it was my first time digging them. i use a 4 prong garden fork now and its way easier.some use a shovel. but i like the fork best so far.

    heres a bed i planted in 2012..started with 30ish plants

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    same patch 4-1-2019

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  22. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Do they dehydrate pretty well? (Have you ever done that with ramps?)

    Thinking of trying that on low heat and using it for seasoning!


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  23. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    never preserved them since i produce so few. i understand many pickle them for use through out the year. you will have to look around for info on that.

    these things are rare in my area..i only know of 3 patches and only seen 2 of them. next patch i know of is 60-70 miles away. i think they got dug out back in the day pretty bad in my area in general.
     
  24. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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  25. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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  26. elkhound

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  27. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Well, the thinking proved correct...and I must make some!

    Excerpted from http://rampitupcooking.com/ramp-seasonings/


    " Finally, Ramp Seasonings & Spice Blends for Cooking!

    Yes, it’s has been hard for those of us who REALLY love our ramps because fresh ones are only available a few months out the year.

    But now thanks to the hard work of several North Carolina family farmers, we can bring to you the first ever dried ramp seasonings and flakes – available all year-round!

    Cure Your Ramp Cravings Forever – With Our Gourmet Ramp Seasonings! "

    http://rampitupcooking.com/dried-wild-leeks-ramp-flakes/

    Ramp Flakes
    Dehydrated ramps. These rare, ramps (or wild leeks) have a flavor, which suggests a blend of both onions and garlic.

    It is very flavorful and yet milder in taste and less pungent than fresh ramps.

    Usage Tips
    Add to meatloaf and sauces for chicken or seafood. Use in relishes or add to egg dishes, tomato, and barbecue sauces to kick it up a notch.

    (The powdered version):
    Add to meat, fish or chicken for a wickedly noticeable punch of garlic-onion. Use in sauces or add to egg dishes, potatoes, rice or noodles for something different.

    Contains
    100% sustainably harvested or organically grown Ramps

    Available Size
    1/8oz. container $14.00 <----- WOW! That's expensive for a 1/8 ounce stash!!!!!!!!


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