Do you believe that animals can predict disasters?

Discussion in 'Safety' started by Corzhens, Jun 6, 2016.

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  1. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    When our country was hit by a strong earthquake in 1990, there were many reports of dogs barking, chickens making noises, frogs croaking, and some other animal sounds that were heard in different places minutes before the big earthquake occurred. Rural folks say that an earthquake has a tremor before it actually becomes earthquake and that little tremors are felt by the animals hence their alarming sounds.

    And not only earthquake but also other disasters like typhoon, there are accounts of animals making noises. Maybe that aspect can be cultivated because if indeed that is true then it would be great to have an animal so you would have an advanced notice of an impending disaster.
     
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  2. Valerie

    Valerie Active Member
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    Animals can certainly hear and smell incoming danger much more accurately than humans can. Dogs can hear inbound thunderstorms hours before we can. Birds can sense the changes in air pressure. Cats can feel vibrations through their fur. I'd say animals are far more reliable in predicting natural disasters and weather patterns than meteorologists are, haha.
     
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  3. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    Animals are way more tuned to the environment than humans!
    They sense stuff so much more acutly than humans!
    It is not that they can predict, its more we ignore the small things!
     
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  4. Destiny

    Destiny Member
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    I remember reading something very interesting. During the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the worst natural disasters ever recorded, somehow uncivilized Aboriginal tribes that lived on isolated islands heavily affected had survived. It's believed they did so by watching how the animals behaved.
     
  5. John Snort

    John Snort Well-Known Member
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    Any soccer fan I'm sure remembers Paul the Octopus. How could the octopus accurately predict the outcomes of world cup matches? I think animals may also have the same uncanny ability to predict disasters.

    Long ago people used to observe [and "read"] animal behavior to predict when the seasons would change. We too, if we know the signs can also learn to predict when disasters will strike.

    A few of them signs:
    - Do bats live in your area. If they are awake during the day [and it's unusual] then there's a possibility that there's something brewing.
    - Should your pet go missing [if it's not a habit and there are no pets thieves where you live] prepare yourself for the worst.
    - When birds start migrating and it's not the season they usually do or stop flying around preferring the safety of their nests there could be something coming.
     
  6. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    Of course. Any quadrupedal animal can predict disasters such as tremors, they spend most of the times of their life laying on the floor. Thus they are more sentient than us in that regard.
     
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  7. jonthai

    jonthai New Member
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    I do agree 100%! I've seen a documentary on TV , and it was about a tsunami that was about to hit a coast line.There were elephants on the beach, and they started moving quickly and becoming agitated , running away from the sea.One of those elephants actually saved people from getting caught up by the tsunami by going to the shore.Of course not only elephants can predict such events , but many others animals can , and we should take in consideration the signs the animals give us.
     
  8. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    Dogs in general are hyper sensitive to the earth magnetic field. That is why when they die they lay themselves in parallel to it. When they take a dump they spin around a few times to be in lined with it as well. All animals have a sensitivity to it, as well as the natural forces and energy of mother nature. Somewhere a long time ago, human or our ancestors have lost that extra sensory perception but those animals that are less evolved still have that trait.
     
  9. BeautifullyBree

    BeautifullyBree Active Member
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    It has always been an old wise tale in my area that animals fleeing means a storm coming. If you see the animals trying to run to shelter or acting "scattered" a storm is coming. We always found it to be accurate. Our dogs would always act funny and want to come inside before big storms. Its funny how they can tell before people . It may be similar to the way people can smell rain in the air.
     
  10. iseeyou

    iseeyou Member
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    I do believe in this, animals' senses are sharp and i think they are attuned to nature more than anything/anyone else which explains why they behave so oddly when they sense that natural disaster is coming.
     
  11. remnant

    remnant Expert Member
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    Owls have long been recognised as a bird that serves as a harbinger of news about impending death. There is quite a compelling precedent on this. I did some spiritual research on the same issue and it turned out to be true. Another animal serving the same purpose is the jackal. These beliefs were derived from traditional beliefs but confirmed in Christianity as unclean birds.
     
  12. tb65

    tb65 Active Member
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    I think they can. I've actually seen my dog bark at the door like someone was there and when I went to check things out, there was no one there. There since of smell is a lot stronger than ours so there's no telling what they since. Some people can even tell when disasters are going to happen before they do, it really has a lot to do with being sensitive to things going on around you.
     
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  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    just look at birds that fly out of the trees when danger approaches, there's your answer.
     
  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    All animals can tell when things are changing, when the environment is not normal. Animals have a strong sense of smell & hearing, though humans in most cases have lost these senses to some degree. The more time you spend in in the outdoors away from towns & cities, the stronger your senses become. You become attuned to your environment. At the same time, some are more intelligent than others, & this is true of all animals, not just humans. Those of us who live in country areas have learnt to trust the instincts of other animals, we use them to guide us in relation to our safety in our environment. Birds are great security alarms, all birds are, some better known than others, such as the Blackbird for instance.
    When the woods are unusually quiet, it usually means that something has changed. It could be a change in the weather coming, or it could mean that there is a predator in the area. A flock of birds rising in the distance is a good sign that there are outsiders in that area. The same with other animals on the move. You learn to tell if the animal movement is normal or if it is induced by danger.
    Keith.
     
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  15. Aleksi

    Aleksi New Member
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    To be honest, I don't believe that animals can predict disasters, however, I do believe that animals are more vigilant than humans and they can and will warn you before something happens but not predict it a day or a week before hand.
     
  16. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I can tell you that it was said that all wildlife & the Aboriginals were absent from Darwin when cyclone Tracey hit in 1974. I wish I had gone with them!!!
    Keith.
     
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  17. Eva.Ling

    Eva.Ling New Member
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    Yes, I think animals have a built-in 'thing' about natural disasters. If you see them acting all nervous, it might be a good reason to be more alert than usual.
     
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  18. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Always pay attention to the fauna when in the wilderness, they are a good indication of present danger.
    Keith.
     
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  19. Eva.Ling

    Eva.Ling New Member
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    There are times when the animals themselves are the dangers to look out for in the forest though...
     
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  20. Mark.c

    Mark.c New Member
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    My dog (Duke) is part of my family unit and therefor part of our BO and GH prep. Animals function on a different level to us and I believe are more in touch with nature and a sixth sense. I also pay great attention to the birds and any animals native to the area. Knowing the traits, qualities and habits of the indigenous flora and fauna to your area is an element of survival I hear few people mention in their blogs and vlogs. Never overlook the small things. Signs are everywhere and in everything. We just need to learn to understand and know what to look for.
     
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  21. Xilkozuf

    Xilkozuf Active Member
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    Yes and no.. They can predict dangers, but they don't have any mystical power to foresee the future like most of society think.
    You have to think that animals are the most extreme survivalist: they have to survive every day, every night, so evolution gave them sharp senses (as many other already said) to always know when any kind of danger it's approaching.
    Small changes in environment, predators, or even humans... anything they don't know might be considered danger. For them, life can be summed up in "eat or be eaten". It's a harsh world.
     
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  22. Mark.c

    Mark.c New Member
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    Not saying they have mystical powers... But as you said, they have many years of natural evolution in the wild and their instincts are so finely honed, that they can detect even small changes in atmospheric pressure. Their natural survival instinct and their heightened senses, some of which are many times greater than our own, do however make their ability to detect / predict coming dangers, be it weather related or predatory, seem somewhat mystical.
     
  23. working3

    working3 New Member
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    Yes! I don't know what it is about animals but they have a keen sense of their surroundings and it's cool and freaky. Animals can sense the supernatural, disasters, moods... They are always aware of what's going on. I take care of my pets and I know they'll alert me when something goes wrong. I think it would be advantageous if people could feel the same things that animals do.
     
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  24. Eva.Ling

    Eva.Ling New Member
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    Is it really true that they can 'see' supernatural stuff, though?
     
  25. Bishop

    Bishop Master Survivalist
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    Where I live before a hurricane hits the fiddler crabs will start moving to high ground the sea birds all come in shore
     
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  26. PriscillaKing

    PriscillaKing Expert Member
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    As others have said, I think animals have sharp natural perceptions and notice some things before humans do.

    Sometimes wilder animals may be more reliable indicators of trouble brewing than tame ones, because tame ones depend on us for guidance...
     
  27. CivilDefense

    CivilDefense Expert Member
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    It in an interesting, but poorly documented phenomenon, if it exists. I am aware of one modern study on the topic (dogs in earthquakes, specifically), but the study failed to find a correlation. It would be interesting if there was more research done on the topic. We'd learn more about our animal friends and how the respond to natural disasters.
     
  28. Clara1993

    Clara1993 Active Member
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    I do believe that animals can predict disasters but not only disasters any bad thing, because animals are the most intelligent creatures! the only different with us is that we don't understand their languages if we did we could listen to them in some circumstances! you know what I mean if u ever saw a dog stopping you from doing something, and that's just what you were able to understand I can imagine how many things they try to tell us but we never get the chance to get what they mean :-(
     
  29. kgord

    kgord Active Member
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    Yes, I think animals are more in tune with the environment than we people are. I think that we should pay more attention to them. Around here I can usually tell when we are going to have some cold nights as I see all the animals, squirrels in particular going around and reinforcing their nests. It is a tip off.
     
  30. PriscillaKing

    PriscillaKing Expert Member
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    True. Cats hear things beyond human ears, which can be very useful. They smell more efficiently and see, well, differently. That allows them to notice things we miss, but it's completely natural.
     
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  31. texsun54

    texsun54 Member
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    Animals have a survival instinct and are skittish. My dog is terrified of Thunderstorms and yes he will here them long before I do, so I can tell when one nearby. He reacts same way whether the storm is distant and never makes it through our area or if it comes right over us, so it is his exceptional hearing that lets him know storm is coming. I can look at radar and see a storm coming that is an hour away and he is completely unaware of it, so he is not predicting the future weather beyond what he is hearing.
     
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  32. Tina Thompson

    Tina Thompson New Member
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  33. Tina Thompson

    Tina Thompson New Member
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    Of course I believe animals can sense danger before humans. I have heard of this all of my life. I can't really explain how they do this, the only thing that makes sense is that they have some sort of extrasensory that humans don't have. Some people can predict things but that's different from an animal who can sense something on the spot, right now. I pay attention to my animals. When I see my cat staring at something I can't see, I pay attention to that.
     
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  34. PedroP

    PedroP Active Member
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    I do aye. Animals experience something which we humans also have but use it to a lesser extent which is called ESP (Extra Sensorial Perception) Kinda like an intuition if you will. Since they live in a hostile world they have to learn to pay attention to everything or else they could get killed they developed this acute perception. So they can notice disturbances in the environment and hence "Predict" disasters (They only notice sooner than most of us actually)
     
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  35. m33kuh

    m33kuh Active Member
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    I can't help myself but to laugh hysterically.
    Indeed, animals have strong senses and we should really know how to tell if they are sensing something. The most common type of animals that can predict or see any danger coming are the dogs. We can all agree to that at some point. However, I am curious though, can cats also do predictions?
     
  36. PedroP

    PedroP Active Member
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    Animals in general. There have been reports of animals panicked and fleeing from regions that would be affected by natural disasters hours later. And I'm not talking about a specific type of animal here. All animals have a strong intuition because it's in their nature to sense danger before it arrives. It's just the law of nature. Be strong or be somebody else's meal.
     
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  37. Inqogn1to

    Inqogn1to New Member
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    You posed a very intriguing question here, and I found it very interesting reading through the answers. Animals are natural born survivalists and I believe we have heaps to learn from their behavior, and how they interact with their environment. Take indigenous people all around the world for example, they are being taught from a young age about these things, and will benefit a lot from their knowledge when shtf.
     
  38. Tumbleweed

    Tumbleweed Expert Member
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    I also believe that animals are sensitive to changes in the earth as well as in the weather. When there was a large earthquake and resulting tsunami a few years ago, people were still playing on the beaches when the tsunami hit; but the animals had moved up into the mountains, and most of them made it through the quake and resulting tsunami just fine. I remember reading that the elephants all went to higher ground.
    Probably the least likely animal to survive would have been dogs, not because they didn't sense the quake coming; but because they stayed with their human family, and so they also drowned with them.
    When Mt. St. Helens erupted, we lived hundreds of miles away , in Eastern Washington State, and as the ash cloud came east acrosss the state, all of the birds stopped singing, and they went to roost, even though it was still daylight at that time.
    I remember being outside in the yard with my children, and seeing a huge black cloud off in the distance in the west. We hadn't heard about the eruption, and thought that there must be a really bad storm moving in, and that is when I noticed that no birds were singing. We went inside and turned on the radio and they were announcing about the eruption and that the ash cloud would reach Spokane late that afternoon.
    By around 4 PM everything was dark, and ash was drifting down like fine snow; but all of the animals we gone off of the streets.
    There used to be someone in California who predicted earthquakes just by reading the lost and found pets in the area, and apparently , he was right as often as the scientific predictions of quakes were right; so I do think that there are signs that animals are aware of that we either can't sense, or ignore when our body is trying to tell us something.
     
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  39. Mauser'sDaDa

    Mauser'sDaDa Member
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    This explains why Josh Posh is correct.
     
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  40. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Animals don't predict disasters they sense things that we can't and it affects their behavior. In Indonesia when that tsunami hit the elephants had already run to high ground before the tidal wave was even visible. They evidently had "heard" some subsonic sounds that they knew that high ground was the place to be. There were a bunch of small elephants on the beach giving rides to the kids. They suddenly took off with the kids on their back with the parents and the Mahouts chasing them. This saved their lives. There was not a single elephant in Indonesia that was harmed by the tsunami.

    There is a man in China that saved an entire town by telling them to leave the town because a major earthquake was going to hit and level the town. He was right. He had been studying the snakes in that area for many years and noted that when the snakes came out of their underground dens and nests and were suddenly all over the place on the surface. This nearly always preceded and earthquake. They evidently can feel the early small vibrations that precede the fault shifting.

    In California, there is a man that has successfully predicted several major earthquakes there. He bases his predictions on the sudden rise in the number of ads there are in the newspapers from people seeking lost dogs. Evidently the dogs hear something beginning several days before an earthquake. They panic and run away from their homes.

    ??? Animals have much more sensitive senses and possibly a few that we don't understand. My dogs will go to the door and sit a few minutes before my wife gets home. She will be several miles from the house when they go to the door. This is at different times of the day so it isn't them just knowing WHEN she is coming home. ???

    There is still a lot that we don't know about the senses of animals.
     
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    1. Dalewick
      Spot on!
       
      Dalewick, Jul 3, 2020
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  41. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    Hated that stupid derecho. Live in Nicholas Co, WV.

    Dale
     
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  42. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I used to have a horse named Packo. He was a sweet older cutting and working cattle horse and perfect to take care of my young daughter. He was totally unflappable and could sidekick like a kungfu master if dogs came nipping at his heels. You wouldn't even feel the break in his gait as he kicked a dog. LOL. Anyway, he hated to get rained on, and if you saw him going to the barn in the middle of the day if didn't matter if there wasn't a cloud in the sky you better get ready for a thunderstorm. It might be an hour later but as sure as God makes little green apple it was coming. Cattle are the same way and will move to a more sheltered place before a big storm. they don't seem to mind getting wet but do not like high winds.
     
  43. wally

    wally Expert Member
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    i remember a earthquake back int 70's where our dog jumped off the couch landed on his face and then ran around in circles THEN the earthquake hit....
     
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  44. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Dogs hear into higher frequencies than people but even that can't explain their almost supernatural ways of sensing things. I have a friend with a service dog that will herd her to a place to sit down before she has a convulsion. This may only happen a few times a year but if her dog is with her she will be sitting when it hits and not take a bad fall.

    Science tends to deny anything that they don't understand or can't explain. There are senses that are not at this time explainable. Both animals and humans have them.
     
  45. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    IMHO the term predict is a little bit generous. I don't think animals can predict anything. Do they sense things are going to happen? Absolutely. Animals have senses we can't comprehend. They can probably smell a forest fire long before it gets near them. Even humans can smell when it is going to rain. Think of how much more heightened an animal's sense of smell is. I would bet dollars to donuts they can hear and feel things we would never be able to feel or hear. Not to mention other senses we don't even know they have.

    I may be splitting hairs here, but to me a prediction is, at a minimum, a specific date in the future, December 21,2012. Animals don't predict. They sense.
     
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  46. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Based on what you say, only humans can predict because only humans could give you a date and hour. When the elephants in Indonesia broke loose and headed for high ground better than 30 minutes before the tsunami struck they knew what they were running from. They went to high ground and nowhere in the areas hit by the tsunami was a single elephant killed. Their special senses allowed them to successfully predict what was going to happen and allowed them to do the RIGHT thing in order to survive. Even though they couldn't talk they did know and communicate to other elephants what to do. They reacted in mass. Their sudden exit save so lives because their handlers and the parents of kids riding the smaller elephants all chased them into the hills and then got to watch the massive disaster from high ground.

    Predicting isn't based on giving a date or time. It is when you offer an accurate description of a future event based on limited current facts or knowledge.
     
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  47. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    Predicting most certainly is based on giving an estimate in the future. By definition predict means say or estimate that (a specified thing) will happen in the future or will be a consequence of something.

    In your case the elephants could sense something was going to happen. They sensed danger and headed to higher ground. Who knows why? Maybe they felt the underwater earthquake. Maybe they could smell something different or hear something we could not. They didn't leave a week in advance. When they sensed the danger they went to someplace safer.
     
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  48. F22 Simpilot

    F22 Simpilot Master Survivalist
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    I read somewhere that someone noticed in the newspaper that when a large amount of cats or dogs went missing there would be an earthquake.
     
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  49. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    Elephants for example have extraordinary senses compared to a human.
    They have exceptional hearing and are able of detecting sounds as low as 14 to 16 hz (human low range: 20 hz) and as high as 12,000 hz (human high range: 20,000).
    Elephants frequently use infrasonic sounds, which are sounds emitted below the human hearing range, in long-distance communication. Research has shown that elephants are capable of recognizing calls and voices of particular individuals from 1 to 1.5 km (0.6-0.9 mi.) away.

    The vision is better than a humans as it allows them to traverse forest and jungle in the dark.

    Elephants have a keen sense of smell, detecting water sources up to 19.2 km (12 mi.) away.

    Nostrils are located at the tip of the trunk and function in breathing, smelling, and drawing water in to squirt into the mouth. The elephants’ sense of smell is in constant use, with the trunks moving back and forth, detecting new scents and information.

    Once a scent is drawn in through thee nostrils, there is a series of seven olfactory turbinals, located in the nasal cavity. Turbinals are curls of bone that have millions of olfactory receptor cells associated with them.

    If smelling does not provide enough information, elephants may collect the substance with the trunk. Then the chemical information is passed on to its Jacobson’s organ, a chemical detection unit located in the soft tissue of the upper palate (roof of the mouth). The organ is attached to the oral/nasal cavities and primarily functions to detect the estrus (reproductive) status of a female. This behavior is known as the flehmen response and is characterized by the elephant curling its trunk into its mouth.

    Elephants are very tactile in nature. Elephants use all parts of their body to interact with one another in all forms of behavior, including parental-offspring, playful, aggressive, defensive, exploratory, sexual, and anti-predator.

    The trunk is one of the most tactile appendages elephants have. It is used to stroke, touch, explore, caress, or reassure in care-taking and may also be used to slap or block in defense or dominance situations.

    The trunk is so sensitive to touch that it is capable of perceiving pressure differences as light 0.25 mm (0.01 in.) in depth, which is equivalent to a light brush against the skin.

    Elephant trunks have extensive sensory motor cells, called pacinian corpuscles, that enable them to have a strong sense of touch. The pacinian corpuscles are composed of concentric membranes of connective tissue, similar to the layers of an onion. Between each layer of connective tissue is a slimy gel. When a movement or vibration is detected, the pressure deforms the gel and connective tissue layers of the pacinian corpuscles. This stimulates nerve endings and sends a signal to the brain.

    Pacinian corpuscles are also found in the soles of elephant feet, assisting in the detection of seismic vibrations (shaking, vibrating movement of the Earth).

    Many animals including elephants survived the Asian tsunami in 2004. It is thought these animals had advanced warning to the tsunami due to their detection of seismic vibrations. The tsunami’s approaching vibrations were detected by the pacinian corpuscles in the elephant’s feet and alerted them to the approaching storm.

    If humans had Pacinian corpuscles in our feet we could probably detect seismic vibrations as the animals do.

    Dale


     
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