Doomsday Preppers List of Supplies

Discussion in 'The Apocalypse' started by branchd77, Jan 16, 2016.

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  1. branchd77

    branchd77 Administrator Staff Member Gold Supporter
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    What is a good supply list for doomsday?
     
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  2. Robert Johnson

    Robert Johnson Active Member
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    Definitely my backpack and hiking boots. I like to make do with the bare minimum.
     
  3. John Johnson

    John Johnson Active Member
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    Food water,of course,some medical supplies,things you can use to trade,gold silver,booze,anything others may need. A means to protect yourself,firearms, bow and arrows,or a knife whatever you are comfortable with. The biggest thing is a plan,remember a trucking strike can change your world just as an ice storm can, it doesn't have to be a world war to put you and your family in danger.
     
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  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    exactly, plus I would add SKILLS and KNOWLEDGE, these things cannot be taken away from you and will last a lifetime.
     
  5. Doug H.

    Doug H. Active Member
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    One of the things I would recommend is a small handbook that every soldier is issued. It's a pocket size book of all soldiers common tasks, ranging from first aid, land navigation, survival skills, and a lot more. You should be able to find some in surplus stores.
     
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  6. Jen

    Jen Expert Member
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    Maybe someone could post a definition of the terminology for people like me that are new to this site etc etc
    For example what does bugging out mean??
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    leaving your home to go to a place of safety.
     
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  8. Jen

    Jen Expert Member
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    See! I'm totally clueless about all the terminology used n I realise I do need to know and prepare for any emergency disaster! OMG - help!!!!
     
  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    what do you want to know?
    first thing is not to panic,nothing is going to happen today, or tomorrow or next week, maybe not even next month, there is still time.
    whatever you do, no matter how little you may think you have done, you are still ahead of all those millions and millions of people, here in the UK, who have done absolutely nothing at all.
     
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  10. Jen

    Jen Expert Member
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    Thanks for your reply and I need to know how to make sure things are safe, what to be aware of what I need maybe what I should have in my first aid kit etc. as they say, to be forewarned is to be fore armed!
     
  11. TheJim

    TheJim Active Member
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    So, a list, can we be a bit more specific.
    B.O.B, E.D.C, G,H,B?
    B.O.B- bug out bag- the one bag with everything you need to survive to reach your bug out location.
    E.D.C- every day carry- a minimal kit that can be carried everywhere and it a daily carry.
    G.H.B- get home bag- those people with plans of bugging in (bunkering down at home) will have a bag of supplies to get you home from any location.
     
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  12. John Johnson

    John Johnson Active Member
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    The main thing is to prep in a way that makes you comfortable. Do you travel, work close to home, a stay at home person. Each scenario calls for a different plan. Do you feel safe where you live or do you feel you need to leave to find safety. I myself plan on bugging in, staying at my primary residence, I have supplies and plans to keep me and my family safe here. It allows me to stockpile food water and protection here. But you always want to have a plan B in place just in case. The terms are not as important as are the levels of protection you feel you and your family my need for what you feel unsafe about. I've been doing this for years so I have planned for all types of calamities, I keep food and water of course but I also keep medical supplies, seeds, and some small livestock. I have gold and silver incase the monetary system failes I have a means to barter for supplies. It all depends on your on situation. People think I go overboard but it makes me feel safe you know what I mean.
     
  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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  14. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Food water shelter main concerns when where how are importain choices the choices are yours basic bag candles fire maker first aid kit water purifer blankets
     
  15. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Allso need cook kit. Soap and clean towels wash colth clothing enough for youself and anyone going with you food can goods. Work but are heavy
     
  16. Para173

    Para173 Well-Known Member
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    INCH = I am Not Coming Home and generally refers to a bag as well. Often a person will say something like, "I keep an INCH bag in my car." Then you have BUG IN and BUG OUT. BUG IN means that you plan to stay at home instead of leaving. People who live in rural settings like in farmhouses often use a bug in plan. BUG OUT means that you plan to leave an area, generally urban, for some other destination. People who have a good BUG OUT plan often have a specific route of travel plan with cache points along their route of travel where they can resupply their food, water, medicine needs and ammo. As they move towards their final destination they stop at their cache points, resupply themselves and then move on. The final destination is generally a relative's farm or rural lodge of some kind. The key is knowing where, when and how to get from Point A to Point B in the safest manner.
     
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  17. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Unlless its a must leave my place due to total desruction im not going anywhere we can hold out here for a long time and will go unnoticed and overlooked by most people coming in on us nomads will be few
     
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  18. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    yep, same here.
     
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  19. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Al a good freind has a plane. we have hidden our place well it isnt very noticeable from the air and with no trouble the road in can be made closed with landslide
     
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  20. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    i'm not worried about airplanes or visitors, my main problem is smoke and cooking smells.
    post SHTF I don't expect many people to have stayed or survived.
     
  21. TheJim

    TheJim Active Member
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    Solar stove....or an electric burner and a solar backup...
     
  22. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I've got about a dozen gas(and I don't mean petrol) stoves for the hunker down period, then I go onto my wood burning stove once the die off has started.
    there isn't a heck of a lot I can do about the cooking smells though.
    I suppose we can eat stuff cold for awhile if necessary.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2016
  23. John Johnson

    John Johnson Active Member
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    I agree. I live at the edge of town, for me I will stay put. I know the area wish I could have another place to leave to, that place in the middle of no where, but don't have the funds to purchase it. So I have to make my home as safe as possible. You know what I mean.
     
  24. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    i'm on the edge of a small rural town, half a mile up the road and i'm in the next parish.
    most people here are townies and commute to work 30 miles away, in a serious emergency half of them wont make it back here in one piece and those that are left will probably leave once the local shop is empty.
    i'll be bugging in unless I am forced to leave by flood(not likely) or fire(always a possibility), too far from any big city-hundreds of miles and many weeks walk-to be too concerned about outsiders.
    I have several BOL's scouted and located, but will only use them in extreme circumstances.
     
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  25. Para173

    Para173 Well-Known Member
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    I know a guy - cough cough - who rented a storage unit about 35 miles from his home. In the unit he has put some locked boxes that hold some ammo, food, medical supplies and bottled water. Every other month or so he checks on his stash. The idea is that this stash is about half way to his bug out location from his home. So, since it is on the way, he plans to stop by, resupply whatever he's short and then move out. In addition, he plans to rest in the storage unit if need be for a while should circumstances allow.
     
  26. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Not bad but someone could see whats there and get there first its not bad idea i just worry on how secure it is
     
  27. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Water does not store well !
     
  28. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    depends how you store it, in a cool dark place is always the recommendation.
     
  29. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Been getting these alerts from survival site or repper site warning of water stored in milk jugs not as safe shelf life as they said at first i really just glaced at it but water from one spring gets green after a few days where water from little hickory spring stores better and longer i know this from years of use of them And. If it came from sisters well it stayed clear longer
     
  30. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    milk containers are not recommended as no matter how much one washes it out some of the milk residue will remain and it will pollute the water, if you keep it in anything other than food grade containers the water should be removed and the container refreshed with clean water about every 6 months.
     
  31. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    I used 55 gal apple juice plastic drums got from ohio school they worked great had all the hardware on them to use as i got them still use 3 in my system. They serve me well
     
  32. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I get the same sort of container from local farms and industrial estate, we mostly use them for water for the garden, drinking water I store in 5gallon water containers, I also store some of those 1 gallon water bottles you get in supermarkets.
     
  33. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    I have 3 in se corner of house in attic we allways have water as it comes down pipe gets smaller this gives it more pressure at outlets
     
  34. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    if you keep water in an attic you have to be careful of the weight and weight distribution.
     
  35. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Its well supported on 10x10 beams of oak i made this place heavey thick and well build yes its alot of weight 2x6planks are the floor but never had trouble with this system
     
  36. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    you've got it covered then, in the UK attics are very flimsy and wont support much weight.
     
  37. John Johnson

    John Johnson Active Member
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    What are the laws about keeping a firearm and ammo in one. If they don't know lol oh well.
     
  38. Wes Morgan

    Wes Morgan Expert Member
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    To me EDC is a my Glock 23, I have never seen it as a kit carried but I guess that would be correct too.
     
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  39. John Johnson

    John Johnson Active Member
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    Put a trigger package, 2 inch chrome ventilated barrel, couple other neat mods on my glock. Heck the first thing I grab, oh yea mine is a 45 caliber, love it, sleep with it, fend off anything.
     
  40. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    Just talking to a friend today
    He might be in trouble as he shot a drone down yesterday flying around his property!
    No one has called to claim it yet but he is expecting someone to!
    camera on it was broke but he got the data chip out and he is astounded by the info they got on just a 5min fly around!

    He has a few gutters to clean out and he now knows where the big python that gets a chook or two hangs out!

    This drone stuff is only going to get worse! might pay to factor that in for the future!
    Defend against them and maybe invest in one or two!
     
  41. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    This is a list of equipment & supplies that I carry in Historical Trekking, this is also my survival gear.
    Keith.
    Equipment List.

    · .62 cal/20 gauge flintlock fusil. 42 inch barrel.

    · .70 caliber smoothbore flintlock pistol.

    · Shot pouch and contents.

    · Leather drawstring pouch of .60 caliber ball (in knapsack).

    · Powder horn.

    · Butcher/Hunting knife.

    · Legging knife.

    · Clasp knife.

    · Tomahawk.

    · Fire bag.

    · Tinderbox.

    · Belt pouch.

    · Fishing tackle in brass container.

    · Two brass snares.

    · Roll of brass snare wire.

    · 3 Gunpowder wallets

    · Knapsack.

    · Scrip.

    · Ball mould and swan shot mould.

    · Lead ladle.

    · Tin Cup.

    · Water filter bags (cotton & linen bags).

    · Medical pouch.

    · Housewife.

    · Piece of soap and a broken ivory comb.

    · Dried foods in bags.

    · Wooden spoon.

    · Gun tools and spare springs.

    · Compass.

    · Whet stone.

    · Small metal file.

    · Oilcloth.

    · One blanket (Monmouth cap, spare wool waistcoat and wool shirt rolled inside blanket).

    · Two glass saddle flasks.

    · Length of hemp rope.

    · Bottle of rum.

    Basic list of what I carry. This list is made up from items that we know were carried, from items that my research has shown were available, & from items that have been found, such as the brass snare wire. I am not saying every woodsrunner carried all these items, but I am saying that some woodsrunners may have carried all these items. From experimental archaeology results in historical trekking, I think the items I have chosen are a reasonable choice for any woodsrunner that is going to live in the wilderness for a year or more.
     
  42. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Very aware of firearms. Never heard of cal you have besidewith what is on market as to gunswhy carry muzzleloader with all the trouble that they are ?
     
  43. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I am not aware of the trouble that you refer to Tom, one does have to acquire some knowledge & skills in order to be able to use one to its best advantage, but skills learning is important, & in this case well worth while. I assume you have not read my other post on muzzle-loading guns, I will post it here for you. If you have any questions, do ask.
    Regards, Keith.

    Advantages of a Flintlock Muzzle-loader.

    1) Ammo is less expensive than a modern equivalent caliber firearm.

    2) The smoothbore is very versatile, being able to digest round ball, bird shot, & buckshot, or any combination of two of these (can also use minies).

    3) The fusil is lighter to carry than a modern equivalent sized gun.

    4) You can vary the load if needs be.

    5) The smoothbore will digest other projectiles besides lead.

    6) Lead can be retrieved from downed game & remoulded with a simple mould & lead ladle. This means that you can carry less lead, & more of the lighter gunpowder.

    7) You can make your own gunpowder.

    8) You can use the lock to make fire without the need for gunpowder.

    9) You can use gunpowder for gunpowder tinder fire lighting if needs be.

    10) IF the lock should malfunction (these are very robust & it is not likely) you can easily repair it if you are carrying a few spare springs & a few simple tools.

    11)If you do not have any spare parts & the lock malfunctions, you can easily convert it to a tinderlock or matchlock & continue using it.

    12) You do not need a reloader, brass shells, caps, or primers. The latter have been known to break down in damp conditions or if they are stored for too long.

    13) Wadding for ball or shot is available from natural plant materials or homemade leather or rawhide.

    14) Less chance of being affected by future ammunition control legislation.

    15) Gunpowder is easily obtainable providing you have a muzzle-loader registered in your name regardless of caliber (only NSW is looking at this legislation at present).

    16) A .32 caliber flintlock rifle is more powerful than a .22 rimfire, less expensive to feed, more accurate over a greater distance, able to take small & medium sized game, & other than not being able to use shot (unless it is smoothbore), it has all the attributes of the other flintlocks.

    17) Damage from a .62 caliber-.75 caliber pistol or long arm is in the extreme. Wounded prey is unlikely to escape.

    18) By using buck & ball you are unlikely to miss your target. This load is capable of taking out more than one target.

    19) There is less kick-back to a muzzle-loading gun.

    20) Antique Flintlock muzzle-loading guns do not require a license, registration, or a permit to purchase in NSW Australia.

    [​IMG]
     
  44. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Loading lumited to one shot then reload as it get dirtty it becomes harder to reload. Dont allways go off even dry wet very hard to get to go off with new weapons they easy to use makeing muzzleloaader a poor choice for most better choice ak 47 the most common weapon in world
     
  45. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Yes I thought this was the case, you are obviously not very knowledgeable regarding muzzle-loading guns, other than what you have read. The advantages which I have already stated above (which I am sure you have read), outweigh the disadvantages of the modern firearm. You have obviously already made up your mind, so I see no point in further discussion on this Tom. I recommend you stick with your modern firearms.
    Best of luck.
    Keith.
     
  46. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    There is one thing missing from your gun kit for your muzzleloader that serves two jobs it waterproofs gun and aids in loading its BEESWAX LUBE FOR LOADING AND WATERPROOFS PAN
     
  47. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    No Tom, not missing, · Shot pouch and contents. My tallow container is carried in the shot pouch, along with other needed items that are also not listed. I don't need it for loading Tom, I use a smoothbore, not a rifle, & if I was using a rifle I would be using patch material already greased. The shot pouch contents also include a greased leather lock cover (sometimes referred to as a cows knee lock cover).
    Keith.
    [​IMG]
    Shot pouch & some of its contents.
    [​IMG]
    Here you can see my brass tallow container just above the turnscrew.
     
  48. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Send me a load how much powder to push that ball ?
     
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  49. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I use 60 grains of 2F in the fusil Tom, & 25 grains of 2F for the pistol.
     
  50. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Thats a light load to push a ball or maxi after50 yards wouldnt be hitting hard or true
     
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