Eating seaweed.

Discussion in 'Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food' started by SirJoe, Jul 2, 2016.

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  1. SirJoe

    SirJoe Expert Member
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    There are a lot of Asian dishes that use seaweed, but I have heard that it isn't any type of seaweed. Are there certain types of seaweed that are poisonous or do they just taste bad?
    In a survival situation were you near the cost this sort of information can be life saving.
     
  2. Valerie

    Valerie Active Member
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    Living in Japan, I eat a lot of seaweed and algae. Plus, being vegetarian, these two plants give me a lot of nutritional benefit. In Japanese food, you might find nori (used in sushi, for one), wakame (a dried seaweed used in making miso soup broth), and sugar kelp, which I haven't tried. Some "green" drinks use chlorella and dulse. Though seaweed genuinely tastes like ocean floor to me, I like it haha. I don't know if there are any poisonous types. Maybe the inedible ones are that way because our digestive systems can't process them.

    If I had to eat seaweed for survival, I wouldn't mind one bit. It's easy to find, store, and use in a variety of dishes. Plus, many are complete proteins.
     
  3. tb65

    tb65 Active Member
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    I'm glad you told me that there was poisonous seaweed. I thought all seaweed was edible, of course I only eat the kind that's wrapped around sushi. I probably wouldn't try to look for seaweed if I wasn't near a ocean, but if I was this would be good to know. Knowing the difference between what's edible and what's not could save your life.
     
  4. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    True, not all algae especies are edible. One of them is the Nori or purple laver, is a purplish-black seaweed often used to wrap around a small handful of rice in sushi. It comes largely from cultivation in Japan, the Republic of Korea and China. In Japan's list of products from marine culture,the nori has the highest production, followed by oysters, yellowtails and wakame, the last being another seaweed used as food.

    Is found in most temperate intertidal zones around the world, illustrated by its history of being eaten by the indigenous peoples of northwest America and Canada, Hawaii, New Zealand and parts of the British Isles.
     
  5. emmaruthnagano

    emmaruthnagano New Member
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    You may not know but seaweed is used in most of our products. We have certain types of seaweed used for ice cream, tooth paste, and more. It also became part of food delicacies in some asian countries. I don't think there are poisonous seaweed.
     
  6. emmaruthnagano

    emmaruthnagano New Member
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    Seaweeds are important part of our lives as they are included1 on our products. But you need to be careful because not all seaweed are edible. You need to identify it first before eating it. Do some research about it.
     
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