Essential Items. Everything.

Discussion in 'Essential Items' started by Keith H., Jul 26, 2019.

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  1. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    If you are going to leave home & will be carrying everything on your back, or even if you are going to use a hiking trolley, then weight is going to be important. So to my way of thinking, in this situation, everything you are packing needs to be an essential item. If it is not an essential item, why would you be carrying it?

    So, can you tell us what you have in your pack/on your person & explain why you have chosen that item for long term wilderness living. Images would also be good if possible.
    Keith.
     
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  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Good post Keith, that is the reason I determined my only course of action was to bug in.
     
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  3. Sourdough

    Sourdough "ALASKAN"
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    Interesting shortage of replies.........considering this is a survival forum. Maybe if we add a government oppression or political angle it would get flooded with replies. Or even better a gun and knife angle would help.
     
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  4. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning IBME,

    I am prepared to evacuate under various situations / scenarios with on-person loads and even Keith's mentioned "hiking trolley". Mine also floats.

    Dues to the variables, natural (eg weather) and public sector (eg NIMS Emergency Support Functions 1 and 13, transportation and public safety, respectively), my commentary would delve into advanced-level prep matters not appropriate for here.

    Remember, only hours ago, a long post in re Iran had commented on Lyndon Larouche (from Loudoun County, Virginia) and Aspen Institute ( Washington, D.C. w/ resort at Queen Anne's County, Maryland). I'm sure you and Duncan know about Larouche ... one of the wives ran Schiller org ... and can appreciate/understand the restrictions I face addressing this thread's posed question.
     
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  5. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I suspect IBME that not many people are actually prepared for long term wilderness living, & their equipment is not sustainable.
    Keith.
     
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  6. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    This kind of answer requires more time than some of us may have right now (speaking also for myself). Lately, I am doing good just to read what is going on and shoot out drive-by posts.

    My own bag is obscenely full and it would take a good while to list everything plus comment on each item, etc.

    I hope to give details some time soon!

    Now that Keith and IBME mentioned it, I would love to see details of your bags. I suspect that I would probably steal a few good ideas from you!

    I know IBME well enough to know that he would likely rely on caches rather than a bag... So, to go along with the questions in the OP, it would be interesting to learn what items he considers to be important enough to cache, and why.


    .
     
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  7. Sourdough

    Sourdough "ALASKAN"
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    Some of my nearest to death wilderness survival events were hypothermia triggered. So I approach this from starting totally naked, now what do I require to live another few minutes or an hour. And that is how I always load my backpacks. There are many-many parts of Alaska that you simply can not build a fire.

    So the single most essential thing is a high quality sleeping bag. And often the second most important item is a back-up or second sleeping bag. The next most critical item for my survival is a quality tent to keep the sleeping bag dry. With a sleeping bag and tent, I can be totally naked and stay alive for days, spending all the time naked in the bag, in the tent.

    To stay alive I don't need food or water or clothes......only a quality bag and tent. Which is why I giggle when people talk about a good cheap pack and bag and tent.

    My best packs are $700.00 each. My best sleeping bags are around $750.00 each. And my tents are around $650.00 to $1,100.00 each. There is no "Good-Cheap" gear for use in wilderness Alaska, not when it turns to survival.
     
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  8. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon IBME,

    Understand the giggling ref good cheap stuff for the Alaska wilderness and survival. Yet, not needing clothes in Alaska - I'm not giggling - means you don't use body armor. Only quality body armor works - no pun intended - and the vests are not bargain-basement priced.

    Whereas Alaska presents ruthless environmental issues like hypothermia, here a primary concern is the 2 legged predator. A Bobcat ATV is a target along with a lifeboat and both require $ plus maintenance $. My satellite phone, with plan, ... you know about them.

    A tube tent can work here. The body armor, the smoke evac mask - one time use ~ $140 - (best model allowing for helmet). If I make next year, a HAZMAT suit might be joining the wardrobe. I participate in too much of the area emergency stuff to know what's required for what "might" be pending. Others are thinking this way also and perhaps HAZMAT suits will drop in price.

    I might not evac because of HAZMAT matters. Fortunately for me I no longer worry.
     
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  9. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    IBME, I guarantee you will not be putting your naked body into your good sleeping bag in my desert. If you do, you will be boiled alive in your own perspiration. Different equipment for different uses and different places. In your Alaska, I want your equipment. In my desert, good breathable boots, a breathable hat, a light weight blanket and you are off and running (okay walking, nobody runs in the desert).
     
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  10. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Fair enough Grizz.

    My Equipment List. WHAT & WHY.

    .62 cal/20 gauge flintlock fusil. 42 inch barrel.

    Why? Large caliber smoothbore has a lot of knock down power with a round ball, very versatile using bird shot, buckshot, or round ball or a combination of any two of these, able to use other projectiles found in nature, only requires a siliceous rock for ignition which can be found in nature, the lock is easy to repair, if the lock should break & there are no spare parts I can use it as a matchlock or tinderlock & keep using it, I can use the lock to make fire without the use of gunpowder, I can make my own black powder, I can retrieve spent lead from shot game & reuse it, I can mould my own round ball & shot.

    .70 caliber smoothbore flintlock pistol.

    Why? Same as above fusil, light to carry, easy to use, good for a back-up & self defence.

    Gun tools and spare lock parts.

    Why? To keep my firearms working long term.

    Shot pouch and contents.

    Why? For maintaining & using my firearms.

    Leather drawstring pouch of .60 caliber ball (in knapsack).

    Why? Back-up supply.

    Powder horn.

    Why? For carrying gunpowder for immediate use with firearms.

    Ball mould, swan shot mould & Lead ladle.

    Why? So I can reuse spent lead by remoulding.

    5 Gunpowder wallets.

    Why? For carrying extra gunpowder, the leather wallet is lighter than a powder horn, once empty they are good for storing spare tinder for fire lighting.

    Butcher/Hunting knife.

    Why? A good basic working knife made for skinning & butchering game, good self defence knife, long blade but light to carry & use.

    Legging knife.

    Why? Good back-up knife for hunting & self defence, easy to access, light to use & carry.

    Clasp knife.

    Why? Good back-up knife, mainly used for camp chores, making kettle hooks, making trap parts, easy to carry.

    Tomahawk.

    Why? Lighter than a modern hatchet, the helve fits in a round or oval eye & is easy to make in a wilderness situation, the helve can easily be removed to use the head on its own for making a new helve or scraping hides for making leather or rawhide, good for trap making, good for hammering, can be thrown for hunting, defence, offence & entertainment.

    Fire bag.

    Why? Greased leather waterproof bag for keeping my tinderbox & contents dry.

    Tinderbox.

    Why? For preparing plant & fungi tinders for flint & steel fire lighting, contains prepared tinder for fire lighting, is used for fire lighting by striking sparks into the tinderbox.

    Flint & Steel.

    Why? For making fire. This method is sustainable long term.

    Belt pouch.

    Why? This pouch is carried on the waist belt at all times & contains my fire bag, my fishing tackle container, my sundial compass & my fire steel/striker which is tied to the pouch buckle.

    Fishing tackle in brass container.

    Why? For fishing & for trapping fowl.

    Two brass snares.

    Why? Small game snares for trapping .

    Roll of brass snare wire.

    Spare wire for making small game snares, can be used for making leaders for angling, can be used for repair work.

    Knapsack.

    Main pack for carrying equipment & food supplies, carries my blanket roll & oil cloth shelter & secures my market wallet.

    Scrip.

    Why? This haversack is carried just for foraging purposes. I often forage along the trail when trekking.

    Tin Cup.

    Why? For drinking tea & eating food.

    Brass Cooking Kettle.

    Why? For boiling water for sterilising , making tea, & for cooking.

    Water filter bags (cotton & linen bags).

    Why? For filtering dirty drinking water before boiling. Light & compact & easy to carry, unbreakable.

    Medical pouch.

    Why? Contains medical equipment & supplies, lighter than a hard container, easy to pack & carry in my knapsack near the top.

    Housewife.

    Why? This is my sewing kit for making repairs to clothing, making moccasins; needles can be used to remove splinters & if necessary to stitch wounds.

    Piece of soap and a broken ivory comb.

    Why? For bathing & looking after my hair.

    Dried foods in bags.

    Why? Dried foods are lighter to carry, easy to pack & preserve well for long periods.

    Wooden spoon.

    Why? For cooking & eating, light to carry.

    Compass.

    Why? A compass makes it easier to tell direction on very overcast days & nights; makes it easier to maintain a straight direction & travel quicker.

    Whet stone.

    Why? For keeping my blades sharp, for working on gun lock parts if needed.

    Small metal file.

    Why? Same as whet stone above.

    Oilcloth.

    Why? The oil cloth is for making a quick shelter, easy to set up & versatile, enables me to use a fire for cooking & warmth close to my bed, can be used as a rain coat, can be used for water collection, can be used to make a boat, gives me more vision around me & an easy exit if needed.

    One pure wool blanket (Monmouth cap, spare wool waistcoat and wool shirt rolled inside blanket).

    Why? The blanket roll is easy to carry, does not restrict my movement/escape at night like a sleeping bag will, can be used as a matchcoat, can be used as a Great Coat, retains body warmth even when wet, light to carry.

    Spare pair of moccasins.

    Why? To wear if my other pair get wet, to wear whilst I make repairs on the other pair, to wear if the other moccasins need replacing & whilst I make a new pair.

    Two water bottles.

    Why? For carrying drinking water.

    Bottle of rum.

    Why? Only a small bottle but I like a tot of rum & it helps me relax a little.
    56bdb54277efb6f8bde209cb5717a554.jpeg
    "Housewife" sewing kit that rolls up quite small.
    56bdb54277efb6f8bde209cb5717a554.jpeg
    Belt pouch, Fire bag, Tinderbox & Fire Steel.
    56bdb54277efb6f8bde209cb5717a554.jpeg 56bdb54277efb6f8bde209cb5717a554.jpeg
    Tin lined brass cooking kettle.
    56bdb54277efb6f8bde209cb5717a554.jpeg
    Fishing tackle.
    56bdb54277efb6f8bde209cb5717a554.jpeg
    Gunpowder bag.
    56bdb54277efb6f8bde209cb5717a554.jpeg
    Knapsack, blanket roll, oil cloth shelter & spare moccasins.
    56bdb54277efb6f8bde209cb5717a554.jpeg
    Fusil, tomahawk, hunting knife, legging knife, clasp knife, & pistol.
    Keith.
     
  11. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Keith,

    Real good loadout.

    Can you say a few words about using a - sundial compass - ? I'm guessing some here are not familiar especially in contrast with the also listed compass.

    Aussie English is different than American English. Here, "house wife" means I am a pack mule for Madam.
     
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  12. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Actually many Americans still use the term housewife or hussif for a sewing kit. Living historians worldwide use this term from at least the 18th century up to WW2 reenactment. Some military still use this term.
    b2496f02b55a4df993cbb2e2286822fc.jpeg

    b2496f02b55a4df993cbb2e2286822fc.jpeg
    This is my brass sundial compass, the compass works just like any other directional compass, the sundial includes a folding gnome. When the compass pointer is pointing to the North (in the Northern Hemisphere), then the shadow cast by the gnome will indicate the time of day. You can see the time markings stamped into the brass surround in Roman numerals.

    This one is a modern copy of one found on Ranger Island in America. These are still available in the US.
    Keith.
     
  13. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Keith,

    Great post with pictures.

    Admittedly, must look up Ranger Island. I know where Wizard Island was ... but Ranger Island ... must research.
     
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  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Sorry mate, my bad, I meant to say Rogers Island, after Rogers Rangers. It is an island on the Hudson River, in Washington County, New York.
    Keith.
     
  15. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Keith,

    Appreciate info.

    I had already looked it up but my research showed Roger's Island is around Fort Ticonderoga, Lake Chaplain, New York.

    It's not important. That sun compass you have is an exact duplicate of the one found at Roger's Island that was of German "manufacture" ... surely actually hand-crafted by experts of the day. Since I'm a geography nut, it wasn't from "Germany" but from the Holy Roman Empire until Napoleon made some changes.
     
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  16. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I googled it, & I am even more confused! There appears to be more than one Rogers Island!!!
    https://smilingfoxforge.com/index.p...e=0&rewrite=1750-s-compass&controller=product

    https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/sundial-compass-rogers-rangers-1750-repro

    Keith.
     
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  17. elkhound

    elkhound Expert Member
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    an odd item to have in pack if in areas of nut production.

    05aad71d3b39ea24db23dd24b1d8c2b5.jpeg
     
  18. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    anyone carry a magnet?
     
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  19. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon Keith,

    Confusion not needed. Of course many islands with the same name.

    The one I mentioned - believe in Lake Champlain (spell?) has the museum.

    These New York places are like here in Lord Fairfax's successful colony. Every county around the York River claims Pocahontas was from there. It's the tourist dollars sought. The history is an annoyance.

    As an aside believe she's buried in Kent, England.
     
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  20. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon Elkhound,

    One of my governing prepper philosophies is for tools to be multi-functional. My offset slip joint pliers does the same job. Don't need the picks. I am benevolent and give to squirrels. Shells to fire.

    Somewhat related; I can open a Brazil nut with a tool used for howitzers and a hatchet. Once got a "care package" of Brazil nuts and more calories spent opening 'em than the nutrition gained from the meal of nuts.
     
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  21. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon Randy T,

    No, don't think so.

    I have some evac instruments for celestial navigation and vaguely recall reading something about "magnet" but in practical terms to your real good question: No, do not believe so.
     
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  22. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    A little more weight to carry, we used to crack nuts on the hearth with the poll of a tomahawk.
    Keith.
     
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  23. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    e6f04701b504093944a6bd0a2d570282.jpeg An historical thumbs-up.
    Keith.
     
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  24. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    No randy, in my case this would just be more weight & no need.
    Keith.
     
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  25. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I wondered about the magnet. I don't carry one but I have used a magnet to pick up a lost screw, check a piece of hot iron for "nonmagnetic" just prior to quenching, picking up loose screws and nails. Sometimes I work on the docks and a magnet is great for pulling up a dropped wrench or hammer or some such. Pulled up a cordless drill once, the water did it no favors. I don't know if it would come in handy after a canoe mishap or not.
     
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  26. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Randy,

    Had just checked my navigation kit. The bag is in a large Rubbermaid bin.

    I do have 2 (two) magnets in the kit. For a water evac ... I'm next to Chesapeake Bay - largest estuary in world - and to GOOD one route was a water evac. "Was" governs. New rules are in place prohibiting private citizen entry into bay under certain declared categories of emergency.

    The 2 magnets are used to declinate a magnetic compass mounted in a metal boat.

    With water evacs O.B.E. - Overcome By Events - will not have magnets in my evac kit.

    Meanwhile, celestial navigation for land travel is "in" and the magnetic stuff is "out".
     
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