Fighting off depression in a survival mode

Discussion in 'Mental Preparedness' started by Corzhens, Jun 20, 2016.

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  1. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    Say your place is ravaged by an earthquake or typhoon or any reason that you are place in survival mode, depression is a great probability. Can you imagine losing all your belongings? And you cannot escape the sadness of losing a family.

    Some of those interviewed in the province that was hit by the storm surge in 2013, said that there were survivors who have gone crazy. They couldn't come to terms with the great calamity that caused the great loss. One psychiatrist said that disaster survivors are taken care of and give de-stressing orientation so they can handle the trauma they recently experienced.
     
  2. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Without medication or counselling, I am not sure what one could do. Your friends & or partner would have to keep a close watch & communicate as much as possible.
    Keith.
     
  3. NormaD

    NormaD New Member
      3/23

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    You know, it's always much harder to see or hear about someone going through something like losing all their possessions or worse, their family in such a tragic way, but you have to remember that for anyone in that particular kind of situation, they have coping mechanisms that kick in - so really it's hard to try and imagine how someone in that situation might deal with depression. Only someone who has been in a similar circumstance can relate.
     
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  4. djordjem87

    djordjem87 Member
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    I have already been depressive and somehow I used this to benefit some of my rare talents. Although I drank a lot I managed to compose and write some of my best lyrics and I always tend to make the best of situations. I understand that if something is here we should stop fighting it and just let it do its work, only then it will leave. I was depressive, scared, anxious, having panic attacks, having drinking problems and I was afraid that it was going the wrong way and this time for good. I survived that and I feel fine now. It is a fight, I fight in yourself, in your mind. It is an energy like everything else and you are just trying to channel it into a right direction.
     
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  5. ZipMedia

    ZipMedia New Member
      3/23

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    I have a major depressive order and a few other mental illnesses stemming from my social behavior, and I thrive very well when I'm alone. If you are under the mindset that you can achieve for yourself when you are alone, you're already halfway there. People who have everything to lose would constantly worry about lack of luxury; on the other hand, I would be very content with menial jobs involving the construction of primitive technology, hunting, you name it. When you are stuck with those tasks for a very long time, it's easy to use gamifcation to your advantage. Tasks that once seemed trivial and tiring then become a necessity, something you do almost from muscle memory. I don't subscribe to the "if you're lonely you'll become insane" philosophy and the reward system of the brain, for those who usually lack from it, will be advantageous in an environment that requires constant self-maintenance above anything else.
     
  6. cecejailer

    cecejailer New Member
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    I understand completely because if even I, someone who lives a normal life and doesn't exactly have anything missing when it comes to materialistic possessions, can have depression, let's just picture people who probably never had that much (considering that most tragedies like this happen to the poorer) losing everything they ever had, even the roof that kept them from the rain. It's so weird because if something like this happened to one of us middle class folks, we would have all of our belongs paid back by our insurance, but we forget that not everyone has that kind of guarantee...
     
  7. AnnaBanana

    AnnaBanana New Member
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    When I think of situations like this, I think of people who have built up great wealth and value all of their material possessions. I think if you build your house on sand, so to speak, the collapse can be quick and painful. I believe that if people, as a society, were to begin to refocus the appraisal of material possessions versus the things that are truly irreplaceable, then a shift from catastrophe to surviving could be done with greater ease. Of course I also believe that this shift is inevitable, and it will happen. Its simply question of when, and how.
     
  8. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
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    I suffer from p.t.s.d. and depression.
    I fear running out of Cymbalta.
    However staying busy helps a lot and in a shtf busy would be necessary.
     
  9. Deathisue

    Deathisue New Member
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    It is hard but we have to stay strong in those situations in order to keep our mental capacities healthy, many can easily fall into the madness by those events and the depression can cause serious mental illnesses.
     
  10. overcast

    overcast Member
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    Only solution I have found for depression is staying among the social people. And those people need to be good. More judgmental people around. Then they may not work out for all the people to come out of depression. Depressions source needs to be found out. And in wilderness where loneliness pretty much takes over. You can't really assume about source. That's where the therapy comes in. So self healing is lot harder in wilderness.
     
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