Food Preparations For At Least A Year

Discussion in 'Food Storage - Canning/Freezing/Butchering/Prep' started by F22 Simpilot, Jul 19, 2018.

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  1. F22 Simpilot

    F22 Simpilot Member
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    I'm trying to prepare in case the Yellowstone volcano blows. I'm not sure for how long I need food. I want to stock pile a little here and there with each pay check. What are some good emergency foods that will last a long time that will feed 6 for at least a year?

    I'm not even sure how long the darkness will last with a super volcano eruption or if a years worth of rations is even remotely close to what I need. I've looked at some of those food buckets and the problem with those are they are sealed in large pouches that are not resealable and I'd need about 100 or more of them for 6 people for a year minimum. Are MREs the way to go? What's a good value and economical?

    I think that takes care of my questions for now. TIA!
     
  2. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    In my opinion you would be better off purchasing dry foods such as beans, peas, cut oats, barley, lentils, etc. You can make your own ships biscuit & they last for ages, as does dried meat/jerky. Stock your pantry with foods you like to eat, including canned foods/fruit. Use these stores & replace as you go, this will keep them turning over & they won't go past their use by date. Don't forget about water storage!
    PS. Have you introduced yourself on the forum yet? I don't recall seeing it.
    Keith.
     
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  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    i'm not a lover of military MRE's, the ones I have eaten leave a lot to be desired but that's just my opinion.
    I have about a weeks worth of dry camping food, can be eaten straight from the packet or heated up, I have these just in case I need to keep a low profile and cannot cook anything.
    generally speaking whatever food you decide to stockpile remember to " store what you eat and eat what you store" and "rotate, rotate, rotate"- eat the oldest item first and replace with fresh.
     
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  4. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    What you stockpile will also be dictated by whether you are a decent cook or a ready meal type of person. It will depend on whether you have knowledge of hunting and foraging to help your stores last.
    Think! Will you need vitamin supplements? Water purification chemicals? Medicines?
    Check the shelf life and storage conditions of everything that you're thinking of buying and as LW suggested "rotate" out old stock before it's bbe date and replace it. You can't just buy the stuff and say "job done, now I will survive the Holocaust" it is an ongoing process to control your stock of goods.
    You will need to provide 1500 to 2500 Calories per person per day, depending on how active you are likely to be. (Less active=less calories) Balance your meals between protein, carbohydrates (in the form of fats, sugars and fibre) and not forgetting vitamins and minerals
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2018
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  5. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    What Keith said

    Only thing I'll add is that if you put dried beans, pasta (we like the tiny macaroni), rice, already dry foods like this into sealed jars, before putting the lid on, throw in one or two deoxygenizing packs. Seal up Kool-Aid packs and sugar also. Don't forget water purifiers -- both charcoal and ceramic filters (Katadyn).

    Oxygen Absorbers for Food Storage
    https://www.amazon.com/Oxy-Sorb-Oxygen-Absorbers-Storage-100-Pack/dp/B0028AG8RO

    Find the best buy on the product above.

    Look into powdered milk, powdered cheese, "other" foods for balanced diet. Dehydrated fruits would be a healthy addition. The Latter Day Saint Church folk are friends to make. They put back food for a year, many do. They have food packing centers where your LDS friends might take you; it's worth a try. You may find their beliefs odd, however the people don't seem to be. I've had a few LDS friends over the years. They don't bite. All world religions speak of the End-Times, new Prophet showing up, calamities, Earth changes, wars, all that mayhem stuff.
     
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  6. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    The other great thing about having friends amongst the CoJC&TLDSts is you'll save on sharing your beer.
    They were some of the very first people to respond to major disasters like Katrina, making the State and Federal authorities look completely incompetent.
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    sorry your going to have to put that into English for me!:D
     
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  8. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    Church of Jesus Christ and the Later Day Saints, Mormons to most of us in the UK.
     
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  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    wouldn't it have been easier just to say Mormons and then we'd all know what your talking about?:D:D:D
     
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  10. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    I think they prefer the name the Church of Jesus Christ and the Latter Day Saints these days. I know a few, once they gave up trying to convert me and I gave up offering them coffee we get on OK.
     
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  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    oh they get the door slammed in their faces if they come around here, I have a "no cold callers" sign on the door. most of these types seem to not be able to read.
     
  12. F22 Simpilot

    F22 Simpilot Member
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    Thanks for the input. Dry goods sound interesting. What's the typical shelf life?

    I lived in Utah for a year and am all too familiar with Mormons. LOL Though, I am not.

    The Yellowstone super volcano has been on my mind for a long time, and we just don't know when the hell it will go off. But I do know it's over due. Knowing my luck and in my lifetime it will go off. I'm now 37 so I gotta about 43 more years to go if I'm lucky. Wouldn't mind seeing tri-centennial in 2076, but that places me at 95 years old. Doubt I'll make it that long.

    Where do y0u buy your dry goods? And how do I know how many calories they have? During what I'm preparing for we'd probably be pretty sedentary so 1500 calories per person is what I'm aiming for.

    I have heard that about 2/3 of the U.S. will become inhabitable, and there won't be deer or anything either. Not even fish since the ash will, pollute the water. So water storage is going to be a major issue. I do plan on buying a bunch of those Lifestraws though.
     
  13. F22 Simpilot

    F22 Simpilot Member
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    I just tried editing my post for a sentence fragment and I got an alert about me being a spammer. That code needs looked at I reckon.
     
  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I live in Australia, we purchase our dry foods from the supermarket. When I was a kid in England, there was a dry goods store with sacks of everything. They would sell you any amount you wanted, large or small.
    Keith.
     
  15. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    You can buy dry goods in the USA from commercial supply warehouses for a lot less if you are wanting it in volume. I worked in one of those when I was young and was amazed at how cheap things were when you bought it in 50 or 100 pound bags. A lot of things that you buy in stores in small fancy packages are priced higher because the package cost more than the contents.

    When you hear the saying about something being packed in like sardines... sardines are packed tight because they are the cheapest part of the package. The oil cost more than the sardines and the can costs more than the sardines. I worked for Consolidated foods for five years and got an education in the value of buying in quantity packaging. When I worked there I bought cheese in 20 pound waxed chubs for about a third per pound of what it costs in the stores.

    A hundred pound sack each of rice, pinto beans, popcorn, whole wheat, and a few 50 pound bags of flour, cornmeal and baking mix along with 5 gallons of lard and 10 gallons of peanut oil will feed a lot of people for a long long time. I also usually have a few hundred pounds of shelled deer corn that can be used as animal feed or after running it through a grinder people feed. at 14 dollar for a hundred pounds it is supper cheap food that can be used in a lot of ways along with baiting deer.

    Don't forget the spices. A few hundred pounds of salt and a few gallons of pepper and such can make the uneatable eatable. Being raised in South East Texas I also consider hot tabasco sauce a staple and buy it in gallons. I'm serious about my peppers and raise my own and will be able to make my spices from those plants and a large herb garden. Spices are not a must but there is a reason Columbus was trying to find a shorter path to the spices from Eastern Asia. That reason was spices. The Roman soldiers were paid in salt. If you don't live near the coast you probably need to think about salt.

    Another valuable tool is a BIG smoker that has sausage racks and the tools for butchering and making sausage and smoked meats. Mine will smoke a hundred pounds at a whack and isn't a really big one. Hand powered meat and grain grinders are worth their weight in gold in hard times as are really big cast iron pots. I have a couple of cast iron wash pots that are huge and we used them for making and canning soups and such. With the beans grains and such all you need is to get meat and you are fed. A woodburning stove makes a nice porch heater now and then will cook for you if you ever need it too. I also have rocket stoves for that too after the various petrochemical powered fuels are gone. We may not eat fancy but we will never be hungry.
     
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  16. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Thanks for this Tex, I had forgotten about buying in bulk, my wife just recieved a bulk delivery of flour a644bb97b186012027f6683bf372c0f5.png
    Keith.
     
  17. Crys B.

    Crys B. Member
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    Actually, I'm LDS. As a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, I can honestly say we prefer to be called LDS rather than Mormons. Mormons is just a nickname that others gave us. Back in the day, it was derogatory. People who hated us called us that.

    That said, I agree with what's been said in regards to preparation. Yes, there are a lot of LDS that run preparedness sites, unfortunately if you just ask any LDS person, that doesn't guarantee that they'll know where to get prepping supplies, unless they're a prepper themselves.

    How much to prepare? Because everyone eats different amounts, I say calculate how much you use per meal. Say you had green beans for dinner. How much did you make for your entire family? Then you figure out how often you eat green beans. Then, you use that to calculate how much dried green beans you'll need (or whatever format).

    Same thing for flour. How much flour do you need to bake bread? How much bread do you go through in a week? (If you don't bake bread, now's the time to start doing so so that you can calculate how much you need. How much wheat do you use for other things? Then, calculate it to how often you'll be using it over a years span, and you'll know how much you'll need.

    Of course, I always say err on the side of caution and add a little extra, just in case, and to make sure you don't under calculate.

    Dried may be best, but there are also canned goods. That might be a bit easier. Say, you open a can of green beans, how often each month do you eat it? How many cans? Add a little extra. That's how much you'll need per month.

    This is just my opinion.
     
  18. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    A couple of other things that I buy and store a lot of is those little canned hams and Spam. They make things like beans and soups taste better and add a ton of calories. Since I live in Texas and we have a lot of Hispanics there are a lot of things available here that you don't see everywhere. There is a soap that is called Zoot Soap that is basically a snow white commercially made lye soap. You can wash ANYTHING with it and even grate it for use in a washing machine. LOL, it also makes a pretty good catfish bait since it is mostly made for grease they like it. Here it is dirt cheap but I see it online sometimes marked up about 500%. We also have cheap access to things like Masa which is a fine flour made from corn and a lot of Mexican foods like black beans that are super good for survival use because they are higher in content than most other beans.

    One of the things that people need to understand is that the food you buy from the stores, whether it is fresh or canned, is there because it is cheaper to grow and/or ships better than other tastier and more nutritious similar foods. Tomatoes are an especially good example of this. We grow a lot of heritage plants that you never see in stores. Bloody Butcher tomatoes are exceptional as is their corn. The thing is it is thin skinned and doesn't ship well so you never see it. The Black Krim is another heritage tomato that we grow and once you get used to eating a black tomato the flavor is incredible. The thing about heritage plants is that their seeds are viable and you only have to buy them once and can gather your own seed there after.
     
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  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    I have several LDS friends and they have access to a lot of great things that are not available to everyone. They have a cannery not too far from here and you can go there and work and can your stuff as part of a share system that is GREAT. You also have people available with decades of experience to help you learn and how to keep and rotate your goods. In the event of a massive system wide break down the LDS will be well set to come through while most others will starve to death. They also are automatically a part of a group that is by nature well suited for working together during hard times. If I was going to be a part of any organized faith based just on its worth and not its philosophy LDS would be at the top of my list. Another group that has proven their worth down through the many years are the Freemasons. They are good about taking care of their own in hard times.
     
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  20. Crys B.

    Crys B. Member
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    I love tomatoes!

    There's also home canned and home dried that one can do. I want to learn how to do those someday.
     
  21. Crys B.

    Crys B. Member
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    My understand is people can still by from the cannery, whether or not they belong to my religion. At least, when I lived in Kansas, that was the case. Perhaps it's not that way in other regions.

    That's cool that the freemasons take care of themselves.

    What do you think about the Amish? They live a pretty self sufficient lifestyle. Do you think they'd make it through?
     
  22. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    The Amish and many of the other odder faiths that reject a lot of the modern ways will probably do well if they can adapt and defend what they have.

    Freemasonry in America is/was a little different from its European roots. It along with the Oddfellows and the Woodsmen were more middle and lower class than in Europe where it was more often a richer persons club. The big thing they all did was insure that if a man died that his wife and children would be looked out for. Even today their public focus is in hospitals and programs that take care of children, widows and older Masonic people.

    Nowadays people can buy insurance where in the US until the middle 20th century you had to depend on your brothers both from blood and heart to care for their widows and kids. With the advent of insurance and the disappearance of honor being important the Masonic lodge is struggling and will probably go down the road of the Oddfellows and Woodsmen in another generation or two. The world is now run by and for the benefit of women and minorities and honor is an alien concept to them. I was raised to believe that a mans word was his bond and you NEVER broke a promise. Women were raise with the rule that a woman could always change her mind without penalty and lets face it a slave couldn't afford honor if he wanted to survive and so for many it was never taught to their kids even after they were free.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2018
  23. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    SIL was with the Jehovas Witnesses back along but she got drummed out for having a black baby...or 2!
     
  24. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    Rice, beans, and greens. You won't die. Throw in a bit of meat when available -- you'll be fine.
    We used to mix poke greens with curly mustard; throw in some streaked meat.
    Find a food supplier to Asian restaurants. I did. These folk will sell your burlap bags of rice. You got American dollar, they'll weigh-down your pickup with rice.
    You can find at least 25lb. bags of dried beans most everywhere.
    Remember to store in quart glass canning jars with 2 packs of O2 absorbers inside.
     
  25. L.Anderson

    L.Anderson Member
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    Canned food, mres is good for storation for at least a year. If you want to know how long does canned food last, you can find it here.
     
  26. arctic bill

    arctic bill Well-Known Member
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