Ginseng And Stress

Discussion in 'Herbalism - Medicinal, Practical, and other Uses' started by Xilkozuf, Jul 19, 2017.

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  1. Xilkozuf

    Xilkozuf Active Member
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    In recent years ginseng became really popular, expecially in coffee, and since it have a lot of good properties it's not a bad thing. Gingeng plants stimulate the central nervous system when affected by physical fatigue, weakness due to illness or injury and/or prolonged emotional stress.
    It also help with anxiety and insomnia, and a lot of athletes use this plant to mantain their stamina and energy. And, if this is not enough, it seems it could prevent tumors.
    Since both stress and fatigue are common in a survival situation, I think ginseng it's a pretty useful plant to know!
     
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  2. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    Ginseng is so freaking awesome.
    I used to drink a ginseng soda after work. It made me feel energetic but not distracted. Focused, toasted. Super nice. LOL
    There are 3 kinds but one kind is not quite the same as the other two, Siberian, Chinese, and American. Maybe i should try it again.
     
  3. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I question any food beverage or capsule that is sold as ginseng . The price per pound for ginseng is so high I suspect any product touting containing this root would contain only a very small amount . Those living in the correct growing zone may want to grow their own and enjoy eating one hundred percent pure ginseng . They can be grown from seed . The seeds will have to be stratified before planting . I have stored my seeds in damp sand over winter then planted the following spring . Buyers like for the plants to be at least seven years old before digging .
     
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  4. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    I second what poltiregist said. Commercial ginseng is notorious for being adulterated with other things that give the impression that it works. It may work very well, indeed, but not likely from what little ginseng (if any) that is in the product. Unfortunately, some buyers of powdered ginseng used in manufacturing the products are often unaware that their source has been adulterated.

    Once you grow and harvest your own, you will see a difference between 100% pure ginseng and commercial products... You might even think something is "wrong" with your homegrown, lol.


    .
     
  5. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    At $500-$600 per pound, handcrafted, and $50 per pound, cultivated. It is legal to grow in several states, including Wisconsin. I'm not so sure that means it's not as effective or beneficial.
     
  6. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    In this household, ginseng is a staple; it's here with coffee, tea, bakers' chocolate,...

    I remember ginseng getting "introduced" / getting popular in the US when Nixon and Kiss went to the Middle Kingdom. Along with Mou Tai liquor, Peking Duck and the other exotic stuff, was ginseng. Ginseng received favorable reviews in the science/medical literature.

    There's a NE Asia species and a US one. Virginia lists ginseng as a threatened plant.

    I'm not a good cook or planter so must rely on Mou Tai.
     
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  7. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    Where do you get ginseng soda? I would love to try it.
     
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  8. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    At a store that carried herbal products and sports supplements, we couldn't get it very often. It was unusual tasting.
    Also carried Royal something, I think it was a product from honey bees that was very popular with men. Lol
     
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  9. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    Royal jelly. I use that myself. It is used to create queen bees. It is like honey on steroids lol
     
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  10. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    Asian (Latin: Panax ginseng) and American (Latin: Panax quinquefolius) are the true ginsengs; the Siberian ginseng (Latin: Eleutherococcus senticosus) is a distant cousin to the Asian. Ginseng means "root of man." The ginseng roots look like a man, head, arms, legs. LOL
    Here are some excerpts from articles I'm linking:
    Ginsenosides are also the main components of Asian ginseng. However, unlike its American counterpart, Asian ginseng is more stimulating. Popular benefits include physical stamina, concentration, and natural energy. It’s also linked to stronger cognitive performance and overall quality of life. https://www.curejoy.com/content/different-types-of-ginseng/
    This article also mentions benefit to men. Didn't mention women, so let me just say, yeah, it works for women too.

    Another excerpt: "The most impressive health benefits of ginseng include its ability to stimulate the mind, increase energy, soothe inflammation, reduce stress, and prevent aging. It also has anti-cancer potential and helps increase sexual potency, weight loss, manages diabetes, eases menstrual discomfort, boosts hair health, and protects the skin."
    https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/ginseng.html
     
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  11. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I just took a walk to check on ginseng . I didn't see any that had seeds ready for picking . If someone wants to plant them they may want to be getting in touch with a grower that sells seeds . Remember they need mostly a shady place such as a woodland area to grow .
     
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  12. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    Have you grown your own from seed before? The laws are touchy state-by-state for harvest of "sang."
    I get the impression it is easier grown from root but it has to be a certain age or size to harvest and of course can't be on state or federal property. I would be very careful.
     
  13. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    Is there any way to container grow it?
     
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  14. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Radar I have grown thousands of ginseng plants from seed but over the years they seem to be diminishing . I don't have the right soil for them to thrive .Yes I suspect you can legally grow ginseng in any state if you buy your seed from a legal dealer . Keep your seed receipt in case someone questions whether they are wild ginseng you are digging or cultivated ginseng . Digging wild ginseng is likely to be illegal . Of course just because you may be able to grow cultivated ginseng legally doesn't mean the conditions are right for them to grow . Sonofliberty I have never heard of anyone growing ginseng in a container but if proper care was given , I would think it could be done . However that would probably mean seven years or more babying that plant before you dug it up . My technique for growing sang is to take a sharp pointed hoe and make a furrow about half an inch deep through my selected site . Place seeds about six inches apart in the furrow and cover them up with dirt . I don't know if I am doing right or wrong but I prefer my furrow after planting to not be covered with leaves to give the emerging plants an easier emergence . Back to Radar you definitely don't won't to plant it anywhere but on your own private property .
     
  15. Caribou

    Caribou Expert Member
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    What areas of the country will it grow in?
    I see that it has an interaction with diabetic and other drugs. What are the side affects? If, for example , the interaction with a diabetic med is to lower blood sugar then taking less or no medication is an answer.
     
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  16. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    @Caribou quickly I couldn't find a link that has listed states but a while back when I was researching it, had found extensive information on what states and general areas. I know it grows in Wisconsin, down into Tennessee, especially in the woodlands/mountains, up into New England, but not sure how far north. Plants have even been spotted in Texas, but I thought it was too hot there.
    There is an Alaskan ginseng, officially called Devil's Club, which is used in the herbal world. Here's the link I found for that
    https://seagrant.uaf.edu/nosb/papers/2003/chugiak-ginseng.html
    but you'll have to scroll down to get to the part about the ginseng, in the meantime, here is the excerpt:
    "Devil's Club
    It is described as being "...as common as undergrowth in southeastern Alaska...forming impenetrable thickets in coastal and flood plain forests. (Viereck and Little, 1986)."

    The thorns or prickles give Alaskan ginseng its trademark name, 'devil's club'. It is referred to as heshkeghka'a, which means "prickle (thorn) big-big" by the Upper and Outer Inlet Dena'ina. When skin comes in contact with the thorns, acute itching and pain result. Hikers along Alaska's coast are well acquainted with its properties, and avoid it avidly. Occurring in dense thickets, Alaskan ginseng is always regarded as an annoyance, yet it may actually prove to be an asset.

    Beginning in the 1930's, the modern medical world has also become interested in Alaskan ginseng. A possible insulin like substance was isolated from the plant by researchers, and it does seem to be of value in the maintenance of diabetes. It is speculated to have hypoglycemic therapeutic action."

    It is not a true ginseng either.
     
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  17. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    @Caribou I don't know enough about the plant and drug interactions to give any advice about mixing it with diabetes, but I would try a little at a time, if that were me or my loved one, and maybe eventually you could scale back your meds.
     
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  18. Caribou

    Caribou Expert Member
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    I have run across a ton of Devils Club out playing in the woods. It always induces extreme caution and if the patch is thick a different route is found. I had forgotten about it being a cousin to ginseng. Probably that is because forgetting about this well named plant seems desirable. Thanks.

    Is there a market for Devils Club root?
     
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  19. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    maybe the soil is depleted of something the roots need? Everything I've read about wild sang is that it doesn't grow well if you are trying to grow it. It is a wild plant and a wild plant will not be domesticated. I don't know about the cultivated varieties.
    Given that it is a root, I'd think it'd be hard to grow in a pot. To me, it seems like a finicky plant that will only grow well out in the middle of nowhere, unseen, in the mountains and back hills of Tennessee, North Carolina, Virginia, W. Virginia, and Kentucky. It's like if you look at it, it dies.
     
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  20. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    Yes, there is a market. I've seen it in tincture form. There are a few websites you could check for availability. HerbPharm is a good one https://www.herb-pharm.com/product/devils-club/
     
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  21. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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  22. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Your right about the soil . I am growing it in the mountains and the good soil washes to the bottoms . Each year the plants seem to be fewer . From several thousand plants I had up It would be optimistic to say I now have one hundred . The roots are also small . If someone was in the right location and had good dirt , I see no reason it would not thrive .
     
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  23. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    Is it possible you're being robbed of your ginseng plants? It actually is a black market item and there are enough people who are aware of the market value, ginseng's location, and who or where to sell.
     
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  24. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Being robbed is possible but I don't think that is the case .
     
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  25. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Carobou I have been waiting to see if anyone else has the answers to your questions because those are all good questions and I don't have the answers for any of them .
     
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  26. Caribou

    Caribou Expert Member
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    Were I to want to use devils club root replace my diabetic meds, say in an SHTF scenario, how would I prepare it and when would I collect it. I've already determined that I will hijack a SWAT robot to collect it. I've been bitten before and before that.
     
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  27. Radar

    Radar Expert Member
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    There are resources all over the place. Library, internet, USDA, herb companies, friends, books to buy. The answers...they're out there.
     
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