Goats

Discussion in 'Animal Husbandry' started by Tom Williams, Feb 7, 2018.

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  1. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    People belive goats are easy to raise lol this is far from true they require very define diets when raiseing them for milk or meat lb for lb a goat eats and needs more feed than a cow fence for goats must be strong and well mantained and they still will get out male goats are dangerous tho small the can put a hurtin on you quick and easy when in rut this is 2x more true as they want and protect the does more.
     
  2. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Tom your observation on the goats is valid but I consider my milk goat a huge asset to my survival possibilities . Not all goats are wild and dangerous . My nanny goat is as gentle and tame as a pet dog . My billy was raised in a big field until he was about 9 months old and is a little wilder .It seems to me how wild a goat is depends on how it was raised . My Nubian nanny goat at highest production gives about three quarters of a gallon per day of cream rich milk . IT would relish most green leaves I might feed it and will simply survive on stuff a cow wouldn't . In an apocalyptic situation going to the feed store or running motorized farm equipment may not be possible . I consider my goats so valuable in such a situation that I would definitely consider sleeping close to them to keep them from being stolen .
     
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  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I love goat meat.
     
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  4. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    ... and they do stink.
     
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  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    not if their cooked well!!!:p
     
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  6. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    only because it could have a serious ramification for some-ones survival I will say , my neighbors dogs smell worse than my goats . I know goats have a reputation of smelling bad , and I haven't been around that many goats ,but mine doesn't have a noticeable odor . Now I did put my pen fairly close to my home so I could keep a close tab on them in case of an apocalyptic situation . The pen itself will put off an odor on warm days ,due to excrement .
     
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  7. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    I also keep a little livestock and one of my neighbours keeps goats. These goats seem gentle enough and are much less aggressive than my rams. I think it very much depends on what breed you choose to raise and how much early interaction you have with them. Most of my stock has been bucket trained, even when I kept beef bullocks...its just easier to lead animals then it is to drive them.
    The only thing that freaks me out a little about goats is the way some of the young kidds bleat, it sounds almost human in the distance.
     
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  8. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Goats around here are as common as hogs as far as domestic livestock. Mexicans are big on goats and chickens. The male of most species is a bit of a problem at times unless you get on top of them and stay there. A boar hog will eat you up if you don't handle them right and a Longhorn bull can be a pill at times. A tom turkey is a monster at times and a Gander will attack a bull. I personally have never met an animal that I can't teach manners to with a bull whip or a hotshot. Goats can provide you with so much. Meat, milk and even wool in some species they are the perfect size for a world where you don't have freezers for storing large quantities of meat. Big animals always provide more meat for the amount of feed but the smaller species are sort of meal sized and usually breed faster and reach eatable size faster.

    Goats are great eating. You can get cabrito in most of the Mexican restaurants here and it is available in stores. What we don't have here is sheep. I have never eaten a sheep in my life. I think that it may be too hot here for them to do well.
     
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  9. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I brought in 3 new born baby Nubian goats inside the my house for tonight , the temperature is going to be in the teens tonight . They are enjoying the wood heater after a cold day outside .They love to be cuddled in a lap and be petted . One day I will probably sell them for some ones survival milk goat . I would keep them for myself if I wasn't concerned about inbreeding .
     
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  10. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    If shtf today I would have the resource of three quarter gallons of milk per day . By retaining my two new born female goats I could bring milk production up to about two gallons per day in about eighteen months .
     
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  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    if there anything like cows they have to be nursing to give milk, so once the youngster is off the teat she would have to be reintroduced to the billy, I take it you have a billy?
     
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  12. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I have full blooded and registered Nubian buck . The milk from Nubians is cream rich and I suppose high calorie making this tasty milk ideal from a preppers standpoint .if the milk is watered down to 1 part milk to 1 part water it tastes more like cow milk but is still a little richer than store bought cow milk .
     
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  13. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    With cattle you eat the calves and milk the cows. You have to let them dry up after a while but then you re-breed them and repeat the process. You can milk them for about 10 months and then let them dry up. They will be ready to calve again after about 4 months. Don't know about goats but I'm sure they have a similar schedule.

    Little goats are excellent eating. when you have all the milk you need coming you let the little goats live longer and maybe some of the females grow up. The nice thing about all that milk is that you can make so many great things with it. I picked up some goat milk lye sap this week end. It is great stuff and gentle on dry skin. The goat cheeses are great too and store well. Goats can provide a huge number of calories to you with very little effort. Even a full grown goat isn't to big to process and eat even in the summer.

    The right kind of goat will clothe you with its wool and leather, feed you with meat and milk and the can make good early warning systems. I've even dealt with a couple of Billy Goats that were good protection. They are territorial as heck and unlike sheep they are fighters. Coyotes don't make a lot of headway with them. They will fight as a group. I think it is that thy are less domesticated than sheep and have not been bred into such a narrow type like sheep. My neighbors run goats and those goats protect the chickens from foxes, raccoons and coyotes.

    The biggest problem with goats is that little goats are so sweet and cute that you have to work hard not to get too attached to them. I never had that problem with chickens or pigs and only one time with a dairy bull that I bottle raised. I still ate him though.
     
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  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    i do like goat meat and we now have a regular supplier locally.
     
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  15. Duncan

    Duncan Master Survivalist
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    One of the reasons we moved to a rural area was to raise goats and chickens. We've finished building the coop and the goat-shed, and we were called two days ago from a breeder in Pocatello that two of her does had given birth, and "our" two Nigerian Dwarf doelings will be ready for us in seven weeks. Our other supplier (250 miles the other direction in Boise) called us the week before and says that three other goats (doeling and two wethers, all Boers) will be ready at about the same time.

    This'll be our first experience with goats. We'll keep you all informed....
     
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  16. Bishop

    Bishop Master Survivalist
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    Fried goat cheese on a boneless greid chicken breast with pepper jelly on a butter milk biscuit
     
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  17. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Before its time to milk your goat you may want to consider purchasing a non electrical or non battery powered hand milker .With a hundred percent manuel vacuum pump milker you know you can milk your goat during the apocalyptic . I have milked cows with nothing but my hands but a goat is built differently . You can buy a manual milker for about thirty dollars on EBAY . I probably just never discovered the correct technique to milk a goat with nothing but my hands . Perhaps the person you are buying your milk goats from can tell you something on hand milking that I don't know . I do know the vacuum hand pumps work great .
     
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  18. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    There are lots of sheep in Texas.
    The most common are Dorpers, Katahdins, and Black Bellied Barbados breeds.
    They are "hair sheep" that don't produce wool and are raised only for the meat.
    Dorper:
    348db8e12f61069a51969f391e478e48.jpeg

    Katahdin:
    348db8e12f61069a51969f391e478e48.jpeg

    Black Bellied:
    348db8e12f61069a51969f391e478e48.jpeg
     
  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    A always thought those were goats of some sort. Possibly people here call them goats to avoid the being associated with sheep farmers.
     
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  20. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    Possibly people call them that because they don't know the difference and just make assumptions. ;)
     
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  21. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    With the Corona Virus rampaging with no end in sight we have made our trips out of our survival retreat to about one or two trips per month . Even then it really is not necessary , but it is good to get out once in a while and pick up some item as more of a want than a need . Meanwhile we have found out goat milk makes some of the best biscuits you will likely ever eat . Home made goat milk soap is something that is far and beyond the mass factory made soap . So far my favorite soap recipe is a goat milk and honey mix . I never want to go back to the mass factory made soap . My doe goat is due to give birth in a little over a week . Hopefully she will have a nice female kid as with the global economic collapse looming we are looking to increase our herd this year instead of selling them .
     
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  22. Duncan

    Duncan Master Survivalist
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    Sixteen months since my last goat post and, boy, have we learned a lot!
    • Dawn and I picked up our two Nigerian kids: Mr. Tumnus (wether) and Lucy (doeling) at two weeks old. The same week, we got two miniature silkies ("fainting" goats): Darwin (wether) and Tamara (doeling). We bottle-fed them all (3X/day, gradually tapering off to about three months where they were completely weaned). Bottle-feeding those little boogers can be a real PITA, but you really get a strong bond (both ways).
    • They love to climb, and, although they haven't tried to escape the fence, we brought them some used tires to climb on. Fun to watch. Once they were weaned, we'd go out on two-mile walks into a couple of vacant 40-acre lots. Leila-the-dog, Dawn, all the goats, and me like a parade. No leash, and they never strayed (but stopped to nibble).
    • Trimming hooves is a real pain, and you need to do it every 4-6 weeks. Also worming them, giving them their various shots and vaccines, etc.
    • We bred Lucy to a buck in Boise when she reached 40 lb and was in heat. Swelled up like a little four-legged ball and had her twins on Good Friday, right on time. Buckling and doeling, both healthy, but Lucy didn't know how to feed and wasn't interested, despite our best attempts. Finally we had to milk her to get the colostrum for the kids, and bottle fed them after that, both with Lucy hand-milked and supplemented with dairy milk.
    • Now we have seven (we picked up another Nigerian doe about eight months ago). Great pets -- we love them dearly -- but, given the trouble and expense, I don't think it'd be cost-effective to plan on raising goats is a survival situation. We already have several of the local folks buying the kids for their children's 4-H or FFA projects.
    • Chickens are the best approach for us. Right now we have various layers for our eggs and a half-dozen Cornish Crosses at a time for meat. If TSHTF, we have plenty neighbors who would gladly cut us in on a steer or pig syndicate (a quarter of the animal each); or would trade other meat for fruit, veggies, and eggs, all of which we have enough of.
     
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  23. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Duncan, thanks for the goat update. As a youngster, I did get to experience bottle feeding lambs and one baby goat. Fun as a kid, not so much as an adult. Also did not have to pay the bills to maintain them.
     
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