Goats

Discussion in 'Animal Husbandry' started by Tom Williams, Feb 7, 2018.

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  1. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    People belive goats are easy to raise lol this is far from true they require very define diets when raiseing them for milk or meat lb for lb a goat eats and needs more feed than a cow fence for goats must be strong and well mantained and they still will get out male goats are dangerous tho small the can put a hurtin on you quick and easy when in rut this is 2x more true as they want and protect the does more.
     
  2. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Tom your observation on the goats is valid but I consider my milk goat a huge asset to my survival possibilities . Not all goats are wild and dangerous . My nanny goat is as gentle and tame as a pet dog . My billy was raised in a big field until he was about 9 months old and is a little wilder .It seems to me how wild a goat is depends on how it was raised . My Nubian nanny goat at highest production gives about three quarters of a gallon per day of cream rich milk . IT would relish most green leaves I might feed it and will simply survive on stuff a cow wouldn't . In an apocalyptic situation going to the feed store or running motorized farm equipment may not be possible . I consider my goats so valuable in such a situation that I would definitely consider sleeping close to them to keep them from being stolen .
     
  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I love goat meat.
     
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  4. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    ... and they do stink.
     
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  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    not if their cooked well!!!:p
     
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  6. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    only because it could have a serious ramification for some-ones survival I will say , my neighbors dogs smell worse than my goats . I know goats have a reputation of smelling bad , and I haven't been around that many goats ,but mine doesn't have a noticeable odor . Now I did put my pen fairly close to my home so I could keep a close tab on them in case of an apocalyptic situation . The pen itself will put off an odor on warm days ,due to excrement .
     
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  7. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    I also keep a little livestock and one of my neighbours keeps goats. These goats seem gentle enough and are much less aggressive than my rams. I think it very much depends on what breed you choose to raise and how much early interaction you have with them. Most of my stock has been bucket trained, even when I kept beef bullocks...its just easier to lead animals then it is to drive them.
    The only thing that freaks me out a little about goats is the way some of the young kidds bleat, it sounds almost human in the distance.
     
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  8. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Goats around here are as common as hogs as far as domestic livestock. Mexicans are big on goats and chickens. The male of most species is a bit of a problem at times unless you get on top of them and stay there. A boar hog will eat you up if you don't handle them right and a Longhorn bull can be a pill at times. A tom turkey is a monster at times and a Gander will attack a bull. I personally have never met an animal that I can't teach manners to with a bull whip or a hotshot. Goats can provide you with so much. Meat, milk and even wool in some species they are the perfect size for a world where you don't have freezers for storing large quantities of meat. Big animals always provide more meat for the amount of feed but the smaller species are sort of meal sized and usually breed faster and reach eatable size faster.

    Goats are great eating. You can get cabrito in most of the Mexican restaurants here and it is available in stores. What we don't have here is sheep. I have never eaten a sheep in my life. I think that it may be too hot here for them to do well.
     
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  9. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    I brought in 3 new born baby Nubian goats inside the my house for tonight , the temperature is going to be in the teens tonight . They are enjoying the wood heater after a cold day outside .They love to be cuddled in a lap and be petted . One day I will probably sell them for some ones survival milk goat . I would keep them for myself if I wasn't concerned about inbreeding .
     
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  10. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    If shtf today I would have the resource of three quarter gallons of milk per day . By retaining my two new born female goats I could bring milk production up to about two gallons per day in about eighteen months .
     
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  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    if there anything like cows they have to be nursing to give milk, so once the youngster is off the teat she would have to be reintroduced to the billy, I take it you have a billy?
     
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  12. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    I have full blooded and registered Nubian buck . The milk from Nubians is cream rich and I suppose high calorie making this tasty milk ideal from a preppers standpoint .if the milk is watered down to 1 part milk to 1 part water it tastes more like cow milk but is still a little richer than store bought cow milk .
     
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  13. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    With cattle you eat the calves and milk the cows. You have to let them dry up after a while but then you re-breed them and repeat the process. You can milk them for about 10 months and then let them dry up. They will be ready to calve again after about 4 months. Don't know about goats but I'm sure they have a similar schedule.

    Little goats are excellent eating. when you have all the milk you need coming you let the little goats live longer and maybe some of the females grow up. The nice thing about all that milk is that you can make so many great things with it. I picked up some goat milk lye sap this week end. It is great stuff and gentle on dry skin. The goat cheeses are great too and store well. Goats can provide a huge number of calories to you with very little effort. Even a full grown goat isn't to big to process and eat even in the summer.

    The right kind of goat will clothe you with its wool and leather, feed you with meat and milk and the can make good early warning systems. I've even dealt with a couple of Billy Goats that were good protection. They are territorial as heck and unlike sheep they are fighters. Coyotes don't make a lot of headway with them. They will fight as a group. I think it is that thy are less domesticated than sheep and have not been bred into such a narrow type like sheep. My neighbors run goats and those goats protect the chickens from foxes, raccoons and coyotes.

    The biggest problem with goats is that little goats are so sweet and cute that you have to work hard not to get too attached to them. I never had that problem with chickens or pigs and only one time with a dairy bull that I bottle raised. I still ate him though.
     
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  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    i do like goat meat and we now have a regular supplier locally.
     
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  15. Duncan

    Duncan Master Survivalist
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    One of the reasons we moved to a rural area was to raise goats and chickens. We've finished building the coop and the goat-shed, and we were called two days ago from a breeder in Pocatello that two of her does had given birth, and "our" two Nigerian Dwarf doelings will be ready for us in seven weeks. Our other supplier (250 miles the other direction in Boise) called us the week before and says that three other goats (doeling and two wethers, all Boers) will be ready at about the same time.

    This'll be our first experience with goats. We'll keep you all informed....
     
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  16. Bishop

    Bishop Master Survivalist
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    Fried goat cheese on a boneless greid chicken breast with pepper jelly on a butter milk biscuit
     
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  17. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Before its time to milk your goat you may want to consider purchasing a non electrical or non battery powered hand milker .With a hundred percent manuel vacuum pump milker you know you can milk your goat during the apocalyptic . I have milked cows with nothing but my hands but a goat is built differently . You can buy a manual milker for about thirty dollars on EBAY . I probably just never discovered the correct technique to milk a goat with nothing but my hands . Perhaps the person you are buying your milk goats from can tell you something on hand milking that I don't know . I do know the vacuum hand pumps work great .
     
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  18. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    There are lots of sheep in Texas.
    The most common are Dorpers, Katahdins, and Black Bellied Barbados breeds.
    They are "hair sheep" that don't produce wool and are raised only for the meat.
    Dorper:
    348db8e12f61069a51969f391e478e48.jpeg

    Katahdin:
    348db8e12f61069a51969f391e478e48.jpeg

    Black Bellied:
    348db8e12f61069a51969f391e478e48.jpeg
     
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  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    A always thought those were goats of some sort. Possibly people here call them goats to avoid the being associated with sheep farmers.
     
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  20. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    Possibly people call them that because they don't know the difference and just make assumptions. ;)
     
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  21. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    With the Corona Virus rampaging with no end in sight we have made our trips out of our survival retreat to about one or two trips per month . Even then it really is not necessary , but it is good to get out once in a while and pick up some item as more of a want than a need . Meanwhile we have found out goat milk makes some of the best biscuits you will likely ever eat . Home made goat milk soap is something that is far and beyond the mass factory made soap . So far my favorite soap recipe is a goat milk and honey mix . I never want to go back to the mass factory made soap . My doe goat is due to give birth in a little over a week . Hopefully she will have a nice female kid as with the global economic collapse looming we are looking to increase our herd this year instead of selling them .
     
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  22. Duncan

    Duncan Master Survivalist
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    Sixteen months since my last goat post and, boy, have we learned a lot!
    • Dawn and I picked up our two Nigerian kids: Mr. Tumnus (wether) and Lucy (doeling) at two weeks old. The same week, we got two miniature silkies ("fainting" goats): Darwin (wether) and Tamara (doeling). We bottle-fed them all (3X/day, gradually tapering off to about three months where they were completely weaned). Bottle-feeding those little boogers can be a real PITA, but you really get a strong bond (both ways).
    • They love to climb, and, although they haven't tried to escape the fence, we brought them some used tires to climb on. Fun to watch. Once they were weaned, we'd go out on two-mile walks into a couple of vacant 40-acre lots. Leila-the-dog, Dawn, all the goats, and me like a parade. No leash, and they never strayed (but stopped to nibble).
    • Trimming hooves is a real pain, and you need to do it every 4-6 weeks. Also worming them, giving them their various shots and vaccines, etc.
    • We bred Lucy to a buck in Boise when she reached 40 lb and was in heat. Swelled up like a little four-legged ball and had her twins on Good Friday, right on time. Buckling and doeling, both healthy, but Lucy didn't know how to feed and wasn't interested, despite our best attempts. Finally we had to milk her to get the colostrum for the kids, and bottle fed them after that, both with Lucy hand-milked and supplemented with dairy milk.
    • Now we have seven (we picked up another Nigerian doe about eight months ago). Great pets -- we love them dearly -- but, given the trouble and expense, I don't think it'd be cost-effective to plan on raising goats is a survival situation. We already have several of the local folks buying the kids for their children's 4-H or FFA projects.
    • Chickens are the best approach for us. Right now we have various layers for our eggs and a half-dozen Cornish Crosses at a time for meat. If TSHTF, we have plenty neighbors who would gladly cut us in on a steer or pig syndicate (a quarter of the animal each); or would trade other meat for fruit, veggies, and eggs, all of which we have enough of.
     
  23. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    Duncan, thanks for the goat update. As a youngster, I did get to experience bottle feeding lambs and one baby goat. Fun as a kid, not so much as an adult. Also did not have to pay the bills to maintain them.
     
  24. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    Put down some rough concrete blocks for them to climb and walk on and that will help wear down the hooves.

    I used 2 x 16 x 16 patio blocks around my water troughs and at the stall doors so they had to walk on them.

    In a "survival" situation they will find all their food on their own. Instead of trying to save them all by worming, you just breed the survivors and cull the weak.

    Rabbits are one of the best things to raise for meat. They can live on kitchen scraps, grass hay and local vegetation. They don't require a lot of room and it doesn't take them long to get to a good eating size.
     
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  25. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    I recently increased my milk goats by one recently born female . With the escalating crises , I plan to keep the female and increase my milk production for my group . That will put milk production at about one to one and a half gallons of milk per day . It takes a serious prepper to keep and care for a survival animal on a daily bases 365 days a year . That is basically a 12 month out of the year milk supply . In a pinch If stores are nonexistent for any reason , I can feed goats on stuff that a lot of animals could not survive on . From my past experience of growing up on a food producing farm , I know trying to produce enough food for a family on agriculture grown crops alone without some type of survival critter would be a daunting task . I can only hope those that plan to survive by gardening alone has some super rich dirt and neighbors that will not raid their garden even when they are starving . My plan is a multi prong food source and water source whether there is electricity or not , gasoline or not , stores or not , rain or not . Goats is just one food source , but what I consider an important one .
     
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  26. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Poltiregist,

    Congratulations on new family member.

    I "tilt" toward the milk aspect. In a survival situation, am ultra-ultra hesitant to allow for mosquitoes / flies to get attracted to habitat.
     
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  27. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    Do any of you have problems with predators attacking your livestock? If so what do you do to protect them?
     
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  28. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    That is a good question Morgan . The only predator I am concerned about is domestic dogs in relation to my goats . . The fencing around my goats is as much to keep predators out as it is to keep goats in . I do have a few black bear in the area and at least at one point a mountain lion took up residence in a nearby cave for a few weeks . Neither caused me any problems . -- Now chickens is another matter . I had chickens and as long as I kept them pinned up and furnished them food they survived just fine . As a prepper decided if that was the only way I could keep them alive then they would serve not much of a purpose if S.H.T.F. . So I turned them out to forge for themselves . A lynx found them and came daily for an easy meal . Soon I was out of chickens . The cat liked to grab a chicken take it off into a thicket and torture it just to hear it squall until it finally killed it . According to my research at the time a lynx pelt would fetch about 300 dollars . I and my son in law set up to kill it . I got pictures of it on a trail camera where it was just sitting there looking at a box trap that it was too big to fit in . My son in law spotted it wading a creek and was taken by it's size . No one ever got a shot at it . Leg traps failed to catch it . --- The lynx encounter brings up another story some may be familiar with , during the Vietnam War the woman nicknamed " the apache " She liked to capture an American soldier and tie him up outside a U.S. military compound at night . Then casteration and peeling off the skin took place so the soldiers in the compound could hear the screams . She reportedly done this on multiple occasions . I was never exposed to the serenade .
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2020
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  29. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    My neighbors are in the process of building a chicken coop. It started as a project for the boys who are about 10-12 years old. It was much larger than we anticipated, and they are now wrestling with the issue of where to put it. City ordnance will not allow it to be 5' from any neighbors' property line. There are no chickens yet. I think by law they are only allowed to have four. My concern is that the chickens will attract raccoons, and coyotes, both of which are prevalent in the area, and maybe other predators. Hawks and owls are also prevalent, but don't concern me as much. We don't have small children, but I would be concerned about letting our small dog out at night.
     
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  30. danil54grl

    danil54grl Well-Known Member
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    We have coyotes in our woods behind the house and have yet had any attach our chickens. They are in our backyard surrounded by a 6 ft privacy fence and the rest of the property has a welding wire fence all around it. We did have a bobcat get into the chicken coop before and fortunately it was still young so we were able to trap it and released down the road about 30 miles away. Also possums like to get in the cool to steal eggs. I've only had a pack of dogs on the other side of the property try to attack my goat thru the fense, but didn't get in.
     
  31. danil54grl

    danil54grl Well-Known Member
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    @Tom I've had goats a good many year and have never had a mean one yet. Now with that said, I have been flipped and put on my backside once, but my Billy didn't do it intentionally. I walked thru the dense and he always meets me there. When I went to patch it closed, Billy turned his head catching me on the back of the leg and I went up and over. . . And I am not a small person at 5'9" . He was a big boy however. It all depends on how they are raised. You got to spend time with them interacting. If you do that you shouldn't have problems even when rutting.
     
  32. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon Poltiregist,

    Yes, true.

    Apache woman was up north around Danang.

    There's now some mil history on this. She was a VC and finally killed by a USMC sniper.

    I arrived ~ 4 months after, but south around Parot's Beak, they sent her away. B esides castrations, she was known to cut off eyelids.
     
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  33. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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  34. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    Here's Beau when he was only 8 weeks old:
    c111c4de2933b0436e26261186c0109e.jpeg
     
  35. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
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    Carlos took care of her. ;)
     
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  36. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Snyper,

    Real nice !

    Wuf, wuf, wuf
     
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  37. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    That is one cute pup. I see your starting him off right with the flock. Had a shepherd offer me a free great Pyrenees pup years ago while working but couldn't accept him (wife has allergies). They are GREAT dogs!!

    Dale
     
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  38. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    We used to dog sit for a family with a Great Pyranees. She was a wonderful dog. Very gentle.

    Beautiful dogs, Snyper.
     
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  39. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Bad day for me today . put my herd dogs on the goats to put them back in the pen after letting them out to forage . One of the dogs got too aggressive with my breeding buck causing him to fall off a mountain cliff . He is likely dead but there is a small chance that he will climb back up looking for his female companions . At least my female goat is already pregnant and a younger female I have I will not have to worry about being breed at too early a age . Actually that buck was getting a bit aggressive anyway . I hit him in the head with a hammer a few weeks ago when he attacked me .
     
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  40. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Holy SH##, Poltergeist! As if enough wasn't already wrong in the world!

    Prayers that the Almighty sends recompense. Maybe God's Mercy wasn't with this smelly 4-legger for having rammed you. My dad would have walked into the house, gotten a gun, come out and shot the beast -- seen him do that to a feral dog (one time, he had me go get his revolver to shoot at two human fellows who'd, with intent, run over our dog with their souped-up car; they squalled their tires and cut out'a there before my father's intended festivities could begin; dear ol' Dad could be a bit temperamental on occasion; his dad shot a fellow in the guy's family jewels, the guy was a thief; one of Dad's brothers was far more circumspect when it came to the shooting of two-legged animals/monsters).

    Don't blame your dog for being aggressive. Maybe that dog had become fed-up with the ram. Not kidding. Trust dogs. They smell/know things that we simply do NOT pick up on. Our dog irritates me, but the dog has helped us a WHOLE lot. I cannot in any way deny this reality about it. It really loves Grandma and our crippled son.

    Your ram did its job in the reproduction realm. Excellent! Became rather expendable after that, didn't it!. Next ram you get, beat the hell out of it while it is still young. Even a freakin goat can learn. My 70 lb dog fears me, yet it will bare its long fangs and get ready to lunge at me if I pretend to hurt Grandma (me wife) -- "Good-doggy!"
    .
     
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  41. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Today I circled around and got under the cliff the goat fell off of . I found the goat . as expected dead . He had fallen about 300 feet . I had GPS checked the hight of the cliff before , so know that to be fairly close . The odd thing to me was he had been covered in dirt . I knew my dogs somehow had managed to reach the goat shortly after he fell but certainly didn't expect them to bury him .Now this is a big goat " maybe around 160 lbs " . but they had done a good job . Only part of his back end and a part of a leg was above ground . Now the ground as you would expect at the base of a rock cliff is rocky with sparse dirt but somehow enough dirt was scratched up to cover that goat .
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2020
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  42. LastOutlaw

    LastOutlaw Master Survivalist
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    Try a squirt bottle filled with water on goats. They don't like water much. Hitting them in the head only challenges them. The water thing works sometimes. sometimes not. I had a buck that weighed almost 250 lbs. Big Boer goat. I could put the hose on him and it wouldn't faze him. I used a pointed stick to keep him back. Stun gun works well as a last resort short of a firearm.
     
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  43. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    Was the goat ate on? Never heard of dogs doing that, but if a cougar, bobcat or lynx at on him, they would bury him for another meal.

    Dale

    bobcat tracks.jpg
    Bobcat
     
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  44. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I do love Goat meat but its hard to come by in this area, which is why I grab it when I can, probably easier in a big city where there is a Caribbean migrant population.
    most sheeple wont eat it.
     
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  45. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    I had wondered about the same thing . I neither have seen or heard of a dog burying a carcass . There was a lynx around here some years back that ate all my chickens . I got a picture of him , a big muscular animal . He liked to catch a chicken and take it down that very same bluff the goat fell off of and torture it to hear it squall . Also black bear in the area and at least one mountain lion took up residence in a cave about half a mile away . I didn't uncover the goat to see if it had been eaten on .
     
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  46. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Yesterday I made about a ten hour round trip to buy another breeding buck for our survival milk goats . This time I decided to go with a smaller type of milk goat so as to be able to easier manage the buck . I got a nigeran buck for my Nubian does . This cross should produce offspring with the ability to produce very high cream content and a higher than usual amount of milk per pound of body weight . --- Something I found out searching for my replacement buck , like amo milk goats are in high demand and sell out fast as people are wising up and entering the prepper lifestyle . I really don't need the replacement buck for several more months but with the prepper buying frenzy and its escalation going on , I decided to go ahead and get that buck while I still could . My group don't plan to have to get down to the level of an animal and dig around in the dirt looking for worms and roots to eat . We will be enjoying fresh and nutritious milk while others eat worms . That is actually the point of being a prepper , so as to not to succumb to an animalistic existance .
     
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  47. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    As a precaution of some starving and desperate sheeple trying to steal a milk goat I lock them up at night . They will at least not be able to simply open a gate and steal a goat . I noticed this evening an unknown vehicle come down my dead end road then turn around and come back by . Tonight will be a cold and rainy night - the kind of night a thief likes . It would be high entertainment to put my attack dog on a looter . I would just hope in the darkness my dog doesn't casterate a kid .
     
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  48. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    Since this thread began and I last commented we have got ourselves 3 English Saanen nannies.
    We initially had some health issues as a high intestinal worm count had caused a thiamine deficiency. Once we had done the basic worming and vaccinations they immediately picked up and put on weight.
    The foot trimming and vaccinations all take place on the milking stand with the help of a distraction (a bucket with a measure of goat mix)
    Saanen are relatively large goats but are docile and friendly. The male kids are good for meat if they're castrated early while the nannies are very productive milkers.
     
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  49. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    As for as I know Ystranc you and I are the only two active members that raise milk goats . Duncan had some milk goats but he hasn't posted in months . I consider a survival animal to be crucial in a long term survival plan . This takes survival and prepping to a different plateau . Fishing , hunting and gardening is also on my survival plan but having a dependable milk source is in my opinion way more important . A couple of productive milk goat nannys is an almost guarantee of a nutritious food source daily 12 months out of the year .
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2020
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  50. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    congratulation on obtaining those Saanen nannies . This is huge in the perspective of a preppers standpoint .
     
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