Growing One's Own Food; Background Article

Discussion in 'Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming' started by Pragmatist, Feb 9, 2020.

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  1. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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  2. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    Always love growing my own!
     
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  3. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    A good article . What concerns me though it seems most prepper minded folks are depending on growing food as their only food source after S.H.T.F. . Note the authors mention of chickens and other livestock and fruit trees . During the U.S. Civil War families sometimes were raided by troops foraging for food , taking their milk cows , beef cattle , chickens and any canned or otherwise stored food . These families were left to starve , usually just made up of women and small children . Even their draft animals were taken , leaving the starving family trying to grow food with just hand tools . Now consider these were hardy people that growing food was as natural as drawing a breath of air . With just some seeds and hand tools even they found it daunting to survive under such conditions . I look at survival food procurement as a three legged stool gardening , livestock , and foraging wild resources . Note looting my neighbor is NOT on my list . Livestock , perhaps the most important leg of the stool is usually missing in most preppers plans . After S.H.T.F. will be too late to get livestock .
     
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  4. Rebecca

    Rebecca Expert Member
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    A good article for encouraging people, he keeps it light, skipping over things like a bad year (weather,pests etc) can cause you to loose the whole garden which is something preppers should always keep in mind.

    While I agree with everything you said, I think part of the problem is that livestock, even just chickens, can be intimidating for people who have never kept or dealt with animals before. So some of the more city oriented/background preppers may be weary of starting. I say this just from people's every day reactions now - "wow you have chickens! Must be difficult and complicated " or some version of that.
     
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  5. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    It's important to stock meds for live stock too. My daughter lost her billy and one of the does are sick.
     
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  6. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Poltiregist,

    A valid point re livestock being overlooked.

    Some do consider it and accept their situation and anticipated environment will not accommodate adding livestock to plans.

    Related to livestock; Had once considered fishing in the Chesapeake Bay post SHTF. My research established it was not feasible. Had once considered 4 beehives... Virginia subsidizes this and USDA calls a bee keeper with 4 hives a farmer. LOL

    Again, the situation and anticipated environment govern the plans. Here, a realistic requirement is to consider a mandatory evacuation.
     
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  7. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    right on target about many living where livestock is not practical so to me surviving there is also not practical after the stored food is gone . Bugging out to where livestock is practical after S.H.T.F. is almost an futile effort . About the most someone could hope for at that point is someone that is sitting in a survivable location will take you and family in .
     
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  8. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    Pets can be trained to join you in an adventure, but most livestock would not be able to bug out. And sitting on a ranch would actually make you a target, unless you could decimate the route in and out to untrained eyes. Forest ranches, tucked into the south sides of hills.....
     
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  9. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Good point Justin . That is what I hope to counter with a group of hardy and well armed group to guard our resources . We have a mini militia on site . We have even gone so far as to train a bloodhound to trail down and dispatch any looters . Our group sit on a short dead end road so there is only one way in and out unless someone tries to gain excess on foot through mountainous terrain . In a S.H.T.F. scenario plans are in place for guard duty around the clock .
     
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  10. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    well,... Makeesha's days as my guard dog are over, but hey, she went with me on my #miraclemile today! She was so excited to get to walk with daddy again!
    bf3ab26c2c3bca6e1615e44081b791ad.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2020
    1. Duncan
      Beautiful dog, beautiful picture!!
       
      Duncan, Feb 9, 2020
  11. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Poltiregist,

    A specific point to clarify;

    My small group has a formal co-op for food acquisitions. Our food supply is ~ 5 years at max consumption rates. Well prior to the end of 5 years' inventory, I'll be relocating to Sheol.

    Must clarify something: "bug-out" and "evac" can be considered the same. Still, all evacuations are not long-haul vehicle moves. My evac is a hike to our inflatable boat (and 2 large life rafts for some supplies). An evac from my BOP I'm in right now ,to an offshore location is relatively safe from forest fires, rabid animals and depending, minimizing the warm weather mosquitoes.

    In practical terms, even well prior to SHTF, the small country roads here are typically closed down ... flooding, wrecked/stranded vehicles, ...
     
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  12. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Pragmatist I truly am impressed . A five year supply of food is beyond anything I thought anyone had on here . My stored food can be tallied in months not years . I plan to fall onto other sources much sooner than you . I will admit I have badly underestimated your survivability .
     
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  13. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Poltiregist,

    Two of our group members own restaurants.

    Our total group of only a few formed a co-op and our restaurateurs work the food acquisitions for 2 rehabed, climate controlled (trickle electricity) containers,

    The food inventory is still the property of the 2 restaurant owners until we experience SHTF or Governor's declaration. Our arrangement is confirmed legal and within the co-op obligations.
     
  14. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    I have also made close friends with the local co-op owners. It was practical even on a non-SHTF level. I have knowledge and a willingness to roll up my sleeves and help when they need it (and I have!) for free, and I get good deals because of it. And the conversation has gotten around to survival stocks over a couple home brewed ales and ciders... Fore-thought can be an amazing asset!
     
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  15. Pragmatist

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    Good afternoon Justin,

    Real good co-op efforts with the follow-on rewards.

    Yes indeed, a premier asset.
     
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  16. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    I tend to lend out my hands, back, and brains... That's my barter-able goods ;)
     
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  17. Duncan

    Duncan Master Survivalist
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    Perhaps in some cases the low profile farms hidden in the hills might be the answer. However, I live on a mini-farm a mile outside a small (3500 pop.) farming town with all my immediate neighbors either mini-farmers (2-5 acres) themselves or families operating larger farms, hay-fields, and dairy farms run by people who tend to look out for each other. The nearest town with a population of a hundred thousand is about 190 miles away and our nearest "big" town (~50,000 people) isn't even on an interstate highway.

    Almost all my neighbors are members of the Church, and being a prepper is an integral part of their religious beliefs. Plus, near as I can figure, there are no neighbors within a one-mile radius who are unarmed. Are you interested in my garden, generator, chickens, or goats?

    μολὼν λαβέ!
     
  18. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I think that this is a sort of regional thing. I live in ranching country and so there is all manner of livestock around me. Cattle, horses, goats, pigs chickens are everywhere. Between the livestock, wild game and feral hogs meat isn't a problem. The guy behind me raises goats and there are several people with big flocks of chickens. At the end of the road and to the side are cattle and hogs. For extra protein, there are all sorts of places around me filled with fish. Now I fish every Friday and we often bring home fish that will filet out to over 20 pounds of boneless meat.

    A GREAT percentage of the people here garden to some extent. My kids and I have raised a garden and sold the produce and duck eggs at a farmers market for extra cash several times. I have access to about 5 acres and with even a couple of acres, you can raise a huge amount of food. I especially like the fall and winter gardens when we raise several types of squash, greens, and cabbage. We also have fruit trees and this summer plan to plant blackberries on the fence row. My inner two acres are fenced now with a wire that will keep the rabbits out and the ducks in. Ducks are a gardener's best friend. They eat the bugs and not the veggies. We then have the garden fenced separately and have a net that we can cover it with. We have put chickens in it when the garden isn't going. They will kill all the grass and fertilize it. When it is time to plant we kill and butcher the chickens and till the plot. We now have three big border collies that keep the little critters safe and three cats to chase the rats.

    I live outside of a little country town with a little less than 500 people. We actually have an old-time butcher store and grocery that butchers for us (Calves, pigs, deer) and makes their own sausage, hams, and bacon. The town is tiny but has almost everything that we need available in it.
     
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