Homestead

Discussion in 'Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming' started by homesteadme, Jun 27, 2017.

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  1. homesteadme

    homesteadme New Member
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    What is homesteading, and why does it matter today?
     
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  2. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Homestead I believe is an American/Australian term, it usually means a place that is out of the city. It may be owned, which is usual, or it may be rented. It may be off grid but it may also be on mains power & all services. It is generally accepted that a homesteader grow most of their own food & may or may not keep livestock. Basically as I understand it it simply means a place in the country.
    Living off grid is a different kettle of fish, though it may be a part of homesteading.
    This is how I understand it.
    For me personally living out of town is important because I/we are more self reliant & sustainable. We are off grid & off all services except the phone & the internet. We are able to grow our own food, & if a TEOTWAWKI situation should arise that can be survived, then we will be able to survive it. Our three sons were raised off grid & this has given them a good insight into this lifestyle & they have learnt many skills that will hold them in good stead. These insights & skills they are now passing on to our grandchildren.
    Having a homestead that we own means that our family has always got a safe place to come to if everything goes to hell in a hand cart. They know to come home if anything goes wrong.
    Keith.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2017
  3. alenwalker

    alenwalker New Member
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    Homesteading is a lifestyle of self-sufficiency. It is characterized by home preservation of food stuffs and subsistence agriculture! It may also involve the small scale production of textiles and craft work for household use or sale. And if you want more information then http://homestead.org/ is a place to learn homesteading and build a sane, earth-based lifestyle!
     
  4. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    My wife and I have been watching streaming TV shows wherein the internal structures of OLD barns are being turned into homes for this day and age ... and maybe 200+ years into the future. The barns in question are over 200 - 250 years old and are still standing due to their awesomely heavy-duty construction. The interior structural beams can be 18" to over 23" thick. The wood used no longer exists due to some species dying-out, such as the American Chestnut. Too, when the pioneers came into these areas, ALL of the trees were "old growth", translation, "HUGE".

    I'm posting some videos. The last video shows how a fella builds his own log cabin using no power tools. For survival reasons, you need all manner of tools that do NOT use electricity.

    The specific series we are currently watching is Barnwood Builders. I like the detail work / the DANGEROUS work they do; however, my big reason for listening is due to the Southern, the Southern Appalachian accent of the workers. These are my people. Outsiders would find these folk "different", maybe even "very different". Me, I see these men as everyday workers. In my travels, I missed hearing my own accent. These guys are always joking. Where I'm from, if you're not friendly, easy to kid with, then you are never going to be accepted. In hard times, during times of deadly weather, if you are not accepted by the community, you die. Who reproduces? Those who are physically strong and who are jokesters and lovers of music. They made their own barns, houses, liquor, and musical instruments. Bluegrass music is a direct descendant of Celtic music. My people are Scots-Irish with some Dutch and German thrown-in.

    One of the many amazing things about these structures is that they were hand hewn. There were no "power tools" back then, not even lumber mills. Beginning in the middle 1800s, water-powered mills with enormous metal round saws began to become common. So, in later barns, one sees sawmill cuts. Before that, one sees the axe marks ... only hand tool marks on these massive beams.

    Imagine a beam 5o feet long and 23 inches thick on all sides (15 meters long; 58 cm thick). Now imagine the methodologies joining these beams to construct monstrously tall and wide rectangular barns ... then roofing it with ALL hand-hewn rafters and shingles. :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek: Sometimes slate shingles were used ... so guess what, those too were hand cut. On top of all this, the finished beams on the sides of the barns lined-up having gaps of only 2 inches (5cm), if that. When modern barn-builders reconstruct these structures, they have a very hard time getting the log gaps as narrow as their ancestors did -- and we're talking about having modern measuring equipment available, to include laser-measuring. Think of that craftsmanship of the past, that outrageous attention to each and every detail. Every log was unique, every pinning was its own. Our ancestors were robust and intelligent, or during the harsh winters they would die.

    A barn-raising was a community event. There was lots of food and music in addition to coordinated labor.

    upload_2024-6-21_14-21-12.png





    The following fellow needs a pulaski axe. Using an angle axe and cutting from the side can wear you out. I can't find a video on the use of a pulaski axe. Modern folk seem to have forgotten everything.



    When I was a boy working a summer job with the Forestry Service, the foresters didn't trust us kids with chainsaws. Too, forestry chainsaws aren't what you see at hardware stores -- we're talking >=4 foot chain noses and HEAVY. The men using these are BIG men; >220 lb, >16 stone, >100 kg. So we teenage boys (I was 17) were given double axes, crosscut saws, & pulaski axes. A pulaski is used to flatten the top of a log -- you cut back towards your own feet and shins. Think of a mattock that has been royally sharpened -- dangerous looking ... and is. We had to wear steel-toed boots and shin guards lest you draw blood and/or cripple yourself. Oh, don't make errors, else you'll pay for it in pain. If you do hard work, you get injured. Your goal is to minimize it. Had to use my car's first aid kit last week. Currently, my right arm is beat to sh##. I've broken my bones many a time. Once had to get an orthopedic doc to put my left leg straight, snapped my lower leg -- that was a Midwestern hell-winter event. Ice and steal can be your enemies.

    upload_2024-6-21_14-54-0.png





     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2024
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  5. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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  6. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Above is a photo of the cabin that I built or about " 90% " by myself a few months ago . Note to the left side of the cabin is my water cistern system , mainly built for S.H.T.F. Note the cistern system is plumed in to carry water by gravity to several faucets for things such as watering the garden or water for the chickens .. If someone should peer past that cistern system they will see my chicken pen . That structure in the chicken pen is a shelter in which I shut the chickens up in most nights to keep critters such as that pesky mountain lion from eating them .
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2024
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  7. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Wow!, super neat.

    I can see through some of the door slats; however, the rectangular "logs" look thick. Are those six-by-sixes? You could put a tall and wide metal plate on the inside of the door to cover its entire interior side. A visual port / gun port you could put on the door side. You could put wide thick boards to the sides of windows and sandbags under the windows.

    What kind of roof does it have? Tinned steel?

    At one house, I built a tall large playhouse for the kids. I used pressure-treated 6" by 6" -es as the superstructure. The railings were pressure-treated two by fours. On the first level, I stacked firewood. Their playhouse was the second story and for the roof, I built one like a house roof, but far more sturdy. Had the roof been flat, you could'a parked a truck on it. To its side was our compost pile. We had large trees, so the fall leaves went into the compost pile. Only problem -- minor -- was that the garden was over 50 yards/meters away from that compost pile and wasn't going to bother with a second one.

    One of my rain "barrels" is actually a cattle water tub. I have to treat it, else it becomes a mosquito factory. That water is only for plants not people.

    I remember as kid the rain hitting the tin roof. Man, was that wonderful! On a rainy night, the roof made a sound that is now called "white noise". It'd put you to sleep ever so well.

    Oh, almost forgot; can you use the cabin as a "tree stand" for deer hunting?

    If you gut deer by hanging it from a tree, be sure to hang it high else your land's big kitty-cat will drag it away.

    upload_2024-6-21_20-5-9.png
     
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  8. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    To some of the questions , The roof is metal and the walls made of treated 4x 6 beams that were stacked and fastened together by first drilling and then driving rebar into them . I made it extra strong as the cabin's purpose was an exercise cabin . I wanted the floor especially strong as heavy weights are inevitably dropped onto the cabin floor during exercise sessions . My construction was tested during the tornado that hit a couple of weeks back . The structure endured the twister but I had to cut the downed timber up and remove it to again regain access to the cabin . -- A few nights ago I heard a sound that I failed to identify as my dogs were cutting up , that sounded sort of like a air powered rifle . Last night was a repeat as the dogs started barking , again heard the expulsion of air coming out of the darkness . Then it hit me , the sound I believe is the angry expulsion of air from a spatting mountain lion .
     
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    1. Old Geezer
      That's one proven structure! I too like running rebar vertically. In my home state, up against mountain ridges, you get a bunch of rain. On any incline/decline, water backs up against exterior and interior masonry walls. No rebar = fallen wall in less than 10 years. A mason of mine poured a concrete dead man (vertical >1 ft wide 5ft deep; some people call these underground structures "sleepers") about 6 ft out in the yard and tied the wall to the dead man with a length of steal rod. Put in the steel rod, then pour the dead man. Any water pushing on the wall would also have to drag all the dead men to drop it = not going to happen.
       
      Old Geezer, Jun 22, 2024
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  9. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    A story about that mountain lion that confirms Old Geezers post . Last winter we had a new member to our survival group , a 17 year old new bride to my grandson . My grandson took her on her first deer hunt late one evening and she soon had a blood trail in the fading light . Knowing they had trespassed into the big cat's territory decided to wait for daylight to recover the meat . Come dawn , the cat had already recovered the deer and had drug it into it's cave . They let the cat have it .
     
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    1. Old Geezer
      Live and learn. We ain't the only hungry critters out there.
       
      Old Geezer, Jun 22, 2024
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  10. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Reviewing Old Geezers post , will add I agree with the rain on the metal roof for sleeping . The cabin that I built doesn't have a ceiling as in terms of what most folks think of a ceiling . A roof yes a ceiling no . That was done for the reason that , I ran several large beams across the room from which to hang exercise rings for doing pull ups and other various exercises with the rings . -- On rainy nights , I do occasionally sleep in the cabin to listen to the rain hitting the metal roof , as I do have a couch inside the cabin that can be converted into a bed .
     
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    1. Old Geezer
      Think about all the billions of people on this planet who have no ceilings. We Americans are spoiled rotten. Tinned steel roofs last a whole lot longer than tar shingles! Now they make metal shingles that look just like tar shingles, so you get whatever color you want AND the roof on the house is likely to outlive your remaining span of years. Galvanized metal protects whatever wooden structures beneath it from the rains. Leaky roof = destroyed house. NEVER skimp on roofing. Never skimp on footers and foundation. Think of your house as having a good waxed hat and sturdy waterproof boots. Yes, I do have a cowboy-type oiled slicker (and parkas). Get wet in the wild and you stand to die. The same is true of your house. American barns built back in the 1700s had quarried slate roofs.
       
      Old Geezer, Jun 22, 2024
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  11. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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  12. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Above is my wood stove cook house . I didn't want to smoke up my actual home so I gathered many rocks from the sides of the road and built the patio and lower portion of the cook house with stones and mortar . The upper portion is built of railroad crossties . The roof , I was given a bunch of shingles for free so it is triple layered with shingles . Note propped up on the right side is two chunks of lightered .That is what it is called in the area that real lighter derives from . I think many know this by the name of fat wood . There is only about 6 or 7 states real lighter grows . I know as I am a retired forestry guy and actually went to classes with my job that focused on lighter . I am not sure what they try to pass off as fat wood in stores , but highly doubt , it is the real deal . -- Preperations for the long haul is my preperation plan as the wood cook stove attests to .
     
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  13. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    [​IMG]A homestead is more than structures . A homestead means perpetual never ending self food production . Those depending on stored foods will have a date that source simply runs out . Today as I watched one of the more recent videos on " The Poplar Report " it dived into the rising cost of eggs , and meat . Some of the unprepared are already being reduced to trying to survive on the cheapest and most unhealthy foods they can find sitting on a grocery shelf . - Though I already have chickens am thankful that I was able to get the baby chicks a couple of weeks ago in my anticipation of what is now unfolding . The new chicks are a breed that yields more eggs during the lean winter months , when garden production is low . -- As for as this household , our diet is very healthy as we produce much of our own food . This is very pronounced as I look at other households whose inhabitants depend on grocery stores and see their health issues and the stark differences .
     
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  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Societal Collapse Survivalist. Staff Member
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    chickens dont produce eggs for long, about 3 years on average, at some point they will have to be replaced, post collapse you will have to breed your own and for that you will need a cockerel, a cockerel crows-a lot- and will give away your location.
     
  15. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    I certainly can not argue with that . In my particular case , I am not that worried about my location being known . If any are foolish enough to try my defenses , will find that I am well versed in such matters as an experienced on the ground war veteran . There was a reason the high ranking officers of the 173rd. airborne brigade , kept me close . When the colonel and first Sargent got fragged , I was the person they brought in to handle the situation " they both survived " . My rank at that time was below Sargent rank . Nope it wasn't my rank why they kept me close .
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2024
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  16. lonewolf

    lonewolf Societal Collapse Survivalist. Staff Member
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    it was just something to be aware of.
    Cockerels will start crowing as soon as its light, this time of year thats 4AM.
     
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  17. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Something that I found amusing a few weeks ago on the You Tube channel with Canadian Prepper . Alluding to World War Three he said there wouldn't be many survivors except for perhaps some Special Forces guy already hunkered down in the hills gardening , raising survival critters and such . Perhaps that statement was just coincidental and perhaps not , but it described this prepper exactly .
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2024
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  18. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    1. TMT Tactical
      I quit watching him for the very same reason.
       
      TMT Tactical, Jun 23, 2024
  19. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Some of you may not know as many feel too uncomfortable gathering survival / S.H.T.F. updates via Canadian Prepper as his style is way down into the doom and gloom mental realm . So I will say , he has finally taken his own advice and has evacuated the city " sort of " . Even with him sitting on an entire huge warehouse packed with survival gear and long term food stocks realize he and his family are vulnerable for a really bad outcome . He has bought rural property , building a cabin , clearing land and preparing for growing food . " Congratulations " Canadian Prepper a wise decision . A real homestead / survival acreage is a big step in the right direction . - a big problem most people have , they can not overcome letting go of their accustomed comfortable lifestyle and adopting a real homestead lifestyle .
     
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  20. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    I have never heard Canadian Prepper say he has a " Special Forces " background . Whether he does or does not , I can not verify . I can say though the world is full of fake Special Forces claimants . --- Going back and reviewing my post on the " Special Forces " comment now see how that could be misunderstood . I was referring to myself " I am ex Green Beret " . I stayed in training for about one year before they sent me to the battlefield . The normal soldier for that time period here in the Unites States was in training for 18 weeks .
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2024
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  21. lonewolf

    lonewolf Societal Collapse Survivalist. Staff Member
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    basic training in a war situation here is about 6 weeks.
     
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  22. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Some fallout maps show some more-southern regions of Canada receiving lethal fallout radiation levels. Canadian Prepper had best avoid those areas. Alberta and the northern regions of the provinces east of Alberta could be rather safe.

    Most likely, based on most fallout maps, lethal radiation levels will be southeast of our nuclear silos (here in the U.S.; all the way down to western Kentucky & W. Tennessee, northern Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi). Thus, Canada is somewhat safe, gambling-wise.
     
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  23. lonewolf

    lonewolf Societal Collapse Survivalist. Staff Member
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    London would be the principal target over here and any attack could wipe out at least one third of the population there, many more would suffer with serious radiation burns.
     
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  24. lonewolf

    lonewolf Societal Collapse Survivalist. Staff Member
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    I agree.
     
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  25. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    [​IMG]IMG_00 upload_2024-6-24_7-22-26.jpeg 58.jpg
     
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  26. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Above is a photo of my smoke house for curing meat , making jerky and such . I took this photo early this morning as I was in the vicinity of the smokehouse toting a bucket of water , to water a few grape vines in the Vinyard
     
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  27. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Yesterday I dug a hole and placed a large cedar block cut from a cedar tree the tornado twisted off . This was done to use it as a chopping block for splitting firewood , using my splitting mall . My plan is to wait until this fall or winter to start splitting up wood salvaged from the tornado damage .
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2024
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  28. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    When the hemlock blight really kicked-in, it was a kick in the chest to me. My kin got slammed by the chestnut tree wipe-out back in 1917. My dad's dad was in his early twenties at that time. My mom's parents were teenagers. I knew all these folk, plus kin who had not moved down to valley communities. Trees are an essential part of our lives.

    Here's a Park Service article on the hemlock blight and what is being done to fight it. There are chemicals that kill the aphids, but now a beetle has been introduced whose diet is the very aphid killing the trees.

    https://www.nps.gov/blri/learn/nature/hwa.htm

    Here's the Forestry Service article:

    https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r8/forest-grasslandhealth/insects-diseases/?cid=stelprd3842820
     
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