How Do You Plan On Getting Water?

Discussion in 'News, Current Events, and Politics' started by Duncan, Feb 6, 2019.

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  1. Duncan

    Duncan Well-Known Member
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    I'm guessing 95 percent of people who live in cities and towns rely on water that is pumped to their homes by large electric pumps, similar to ones which operate sewage and water-purification systems. In my town of ~4000 it's the same; and while homes outside in the county -- like mine -- have a well, they operate by pumps running off the electrical grid.

    The electrical grid is the one piece of infrastructure which is probably the most critical to survival. No electrical grid, no water, and that means you will probably die in three days.

    How are you addressing this problem?
     
  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    wells, springs, rivers and streams in open country, plenty of rainfall in this area, water not a problem in a mild climate.
     
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  3. IBME

    IBME Well-Known Member
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    I just haul water in 5 gal. plastic jugs. I just dip it out of the creek. No need to treat it, it is pure fresh water, just like humans have been getting water for many thousands of years. I use a backpack in the summer to haul water and a sled in the winter.

    And you don't really need electric, people been living for thousands of years without electric. I have spent much of the last 49 years in Alaska wilderness without electric.
     
  4. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Well-Known Member
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    I am very fortunate. We have ample water supplies that are very close. A creek runs through our neighborhood; probably not more than 50-100 yards from my house. We have two lakes that are walking distance. A river is a little farther away.

    We have a small pond, and a large cement fountain on our property as catch systems, as well as a catch system (40 gallon drum) for rain water. We have methods to filter , boil, and purify when needed. We also have tub liners in each bathroom that will hold approx. 30 gallons. These would be filled first at the first hint of municipal water going down or being tainted.

    Maybe a grid down situation is the only way I will find out, but there was a rumor that our house was built over an old spring. When they were digging the basement there were some water issues. We have a sump pump that does run occasionally. If the power were down for a prolonged period of time maybe I will go into the water business. I might have a more than ample supply.

    I don't think water will be an issue in my area for the foreseeable future.
     
  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    absolutely right, I lived for 12 years just dipping it out of the river.
    but I can just imagine the masses when the tap/faucet? runs dry.
    electric is a modern invention less than 100 years old in my country.
     
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  6. Duncan

    Duncan Well-Known Member
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    You three are smart and/or lucky; but I'd be willing to bet that even here you're a minority. No matter how easy it is for you to get water now, you might run into unforeseen problems with more and more people sharing -- or attempting to share -- your water supplies. And at least 9 out of ten people in the US do not have the access or knowledge to come up with potable water. When 90 percent of the city dwellers and half of the rural ones die, that will put a tremendous load on health-service industries, and if Mister Panicked Suburbanite doesn't become a problem for you, Mr. Typhus and Mr. Bubonic Plague will!

    Back in the 1980's, I worked for a PV company, and designed and built quite a few installations on places like the Navajo Rez, Central America, and even one in Gabon. I've collected enough information on my well pump (inefficient AC), total dynamic head of my well (244 feet at 10 gal/hr) and priced out removal of the old pump, installation of a DC submersible pump, build and set up of a 3000-gal elevated tank, and the PV modules, along with the balance of systems (but no batteries -- I won't use them) and it comes to about $7500.

    I hate to spend that kind of money on something I probably won't need, but if TSHTF, it could be a life-or-death situation for me, my family, my critters, and the garden.
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    some of us don't have $7500 to spend!
    water will be treated, filtered and boiled.
    as for urbanites, they will be dead long before they can even think of looking for water, 3 days without water and they are history. most people will be too weak from lack of water, and probably food, before that to go further than the end of their street.
     
  8. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Active Member
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    Water really should be the very first prep, and have plans A, B, and C for how to get more.

    We're pretty 'well' prepared in this regard. Three wells, the main house with a submersible Grundfos pump (110v, run from our inverter or the generator), a pump jack at the guest house (run by electric motor and generator now, but could be manually operated if needed), and the third with just a handpump (just had the leather cups changed and the screen replaced 2 years ago). Two 55 gallon rain barrels on the gutter downspouts, and a creek on public land about 150' from the house. A Big Berkey and a couple smaller filters just in case, and plenty of chems (chlorine and iodine mostly) to disinfect water if needed.
     
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  9. IBME

    IBME Well-Known Member
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    Me not lucky me looked around and chose this location to move to. I think most people choose to live where they know they will die in a serious SHTF event.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
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  10. IBME

    IBME Well-Known Member
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    NOPE......chose this location (in part) because there are no humans here, plus there are dozens of pure fresh water creeks everywhere here.
     
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  11. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    No water= no flushing toilet!!!
    We are off grid, we supply everything ourselves. Tank water fed by gravity to the main house, & composting toilets.

    dfa00396c5f236bb29f82e9753f11136.jpeg
    5000 gallon fed from the cottage roof.
    dfa00396c5f236bb29f82e9753f11136.jpeg
    Two 5000 gallon tanks, the lower one fed from the main house roof, this is then pumped up to the higher tank to gravity feed the house. We have an electric pump powered by solar, but we also have two fire fighting petrol driven pumps. One of these pumps supplies water from Cattail Pond for the gardens.
    dfa00396c5f236bb29f82e9753f11136.jpeg
    1000 gallon tank for the garden fed form part of the main house roof. All tanks overflow into water butts now.
    dfa00396c5f236bb29f82e9753f11136.jpeg
    Cattail Pond in the bottom of Butterfly Valley below the main house.
    If for some reason we were to lose our solar power & the use of the pumps, we can still manually feed the upper water tanks, or we can simply carry the water inside the house for use as we did for 20 years.
    We also have two other 1000 gallon tanks, one is fed from a shed roof for the cottage gardens, the other one will be fed from the garage when it is erected in the near future.
    Keith.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
  12. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Even in desert cities, there will be thousands of gallons of water available, even after the water pumps shut down. The majority of city people will just not know where to look or how to tap these resources.
     
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  13. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Well-Known Member
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    We are fortunate to have a good well at a moderate depth of 110 feet. I have deep well bucket that I can use if SHTF and this could provide all the water we need to drink/domestic use when electricity goes away. We also have decent rain during the summer that provides for the majority of my agriculture needs. I have one stream that runs through our property that can supplement what I need if we have a dry spell. Also there are a couple springs that produce during the growing season. Water is pretty set, and it’s among the best tasting on the planet!
     
  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I think for many people who have not prepared for leaving if they have to, the problem will be no water in the actual home, & it not being safe outside the home to forage. You have obviously thought about "what if", & are prepared for it. Many would not consider leaving their home no matter what!
    Keith.
     
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  15. coffee

    coffee Well-Known Member
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  16. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    I am a great believer in Mr. Murphy and his desire have fun at my expense. I plan to have my plans fail and then move onto the next plan.

    I have one in my vehicle, in my home and in my BOB. They are an absolute must in my environment and in my plans. Folks also need to know how and where they will be used. Water is were you find it and find it you must.
     
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  17. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    In Southern Appalachia, there is no shortage of rain and I can walk to a river not far from my house. If that puppy dries up, then this planet has died. Not a good thing.

    Having gathered the water, how to purify it becomes the issue. I have both ceramic type (Katadyn) and charcoal type water filters. Speaking of which, I should go buy some more activated charcoal. And you can make your own charcoal. Charcoal gets the bad aromas out ... sorta kinda. Boil this. Keep a bunch of powdered drink mix to help make the water drinkable. Kids will not drink plain ol' water, therefore you MUST add Kool-Aid for the kids. Keep powdered tea, lemonade, grape, fruit punch, ... . Seal these powder packs in glass jars -- toss in desiccant packs and oxygen absorbers before tightening the lids.

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=do+it+yourself+making+activated+charcoal&t=hk&atb=v140-1__&ia=web

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=water+storage+barrels+20+gallon&t=hk&atb=v140-1__&ia=products
     
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  18. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=rain+water+gather+tarpaulon&t=hk&atb=v140-1__&iax=images&ia=images

    e6e6ef2b045163736503e70f18b408b2.jpeg

    Rain water run-off from your roof into guttering can be used on your garden. Some university studied whether this water contained chemicals from asphalt roof tiles and would such chemicals hurt anything. Findings were that the water contained precious little contaminating chemicals and what there was in the water didn't even begin to reach hazard levels. So, for gardening, gutter water is just fine. Just don't flood your garden, for heaven's sake -- you gotta brain, use it.

    Do NOT go and pay way too much money for rain barrels. Lord have mercy! Seen those prices?! Holy sh##! We just bought the cheapest we could find. Garbage cans may be impregnated with insecticides, so read literature before purchasing. You can use galvanized steel enclosures that are used by ranchers to feed their cattle. Those things are built well and have standard water take-offs that are threaded for water hoses.
     
  19. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    This is one of the ways I collect water when on treks, I catch the rain from my oilcloth in my kettle.
    Keith.
     
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  20. poltiregist

    poltiregist Expert Member
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    I have a spring and a creek on my property that would supply water 12 months out of the year . I can understand people choosing to live where water would be lost in a prolonged loss of electricity , seems most folks plan to used a motorized vehicle to reach a water sustainable location . one problem with this plan most "if they did reach their desired last stand location "would find a hoard of desperate starving people there . Anyone in a starving for food squatter town would find it difficult to survive , being exposed to desperate two legged animals . I would expect such desperate people clusters to be found under bridges and by lakes . Many would sit and starve in their homes from lack of food and water , others will starve or be killed in the squatter towns . The US governments estimate of a ninety percent die off in 12 months if electricity was lost I think is a reasonable estimate .
     
  21. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Well-Known Member
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    Agreed. A big problem would be these knuckleheads polluting the water source, starting fires, and causing other mayhem. One of the reasons I want to be as isolated as possible from other humans.
     
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  22. Bishop

    Bishop Master Survivalist
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  23. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    that's what preppers in the UK think too, of course we have a lower population(than the US) to start with!!
     
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