How Do You Plan On Getting Water?

Discussion in 'News, Current Events, and Politics' started by Duncan, Feb 6, 2019.

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  1. Duncan

    Duncan Expert Member
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    I'm guessing 95 percent of people who live in cities and towns rely on water that is pumped to their homes by large electric pumps, similar to ones which operate sewage and water-purification systems. In my town of ~4000 it's the same; and while homes outside in the county -- like mine -- have a well, they operate by pumps running off the electrical grid.

    The electrical grid is the one piece of infrastructure which is probably the most critical to survival. No electrical grid, no water, and that means you will probably die in three days.

    How are you addressing this problem?
     
  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    wells, springs, rivers and streams in open country, plenty of rainfall in this area, water not a problem in a mild climate.
     
  3. Sourdough

    Sourdough "ALASKAN"
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    I just haul water in 5 gal. plastic jugs. I just dip it out of the creek. No need to treat it, it is pure fresh water, just like humans have been getting water for many thousands of years. I use a backpack in the summer to haul water and a sled in the winter.

    And you don't really need electric, people been living for thousands of years without electric. I have spent much of the last 49 years in Alaska wilderness without electric.
     
  4. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    I am very fortunate. We have ample water supplies that are very close. A creek runs through our neighborhood; probably not more than 50-100 yards from my house. We have two lakes that are walking distance. A river is a little farther away.

    We have a small pond, and a large cement fountain on our property as catch systems, as well as a catch system (40 gallon drum) for rain water. We have methods to filter , boil, and purify when needed. We also have tub liners in each bathroom that will hold approx. 30 gallons. These would be filled first at the first hint of municipal water going down or being tainted.

    Maybe a grid down situation is the only way I will find out, but there was a rumor that our house was built over an old spring. When they were digging the basement there were some water issues. We have a sump pump that does run occasionally. If the power were down for a prolonged period of time maybe I will go into the water business. I might have a more than ample supply.

    I don't think water will be an issue in my area for the foreseeable future.
     
  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    absolutely right, I lived for 12 years just dipping it out of the river.
    but I can just imagine the masses when the tap/faucet? runs dry.
    electric is a modern invention less than 100 years old in my country.
     
  6. Duncan

    Duncan Expert Member
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    You three are smart and/or lucky; but I'd be willing to bet that even here you're a minority. No matter how easy it is for you to get water now, you might run into unforeseen problems with more and more people sharing -- or attempting to share -- your water supplies. And at least 9 out of ten people in the US do not have the access or knowledge to come up with potable water. When 90 percent of the city dwellers and half of the rural ones die, that will put a tremendous load on health-service industries, and if Mister Panicked Suburbanite doesn't become a problem for you, Mr. Typhus and Mr. Bubonic Plague will!

    Back in the 1980's, I worked for a PV company, and designed and built quite a few installations on places like the Navajo Rez, Central America, and even one in Gabon. I've collected enough information on my well pump (inefficient AC), total dynamic head of my well (244 feet at 10 gal/hr) and priced out removal of the old pump, installation of a DC submersible pump, build and set up of a 3000-gal elevated tank, and the PV modules, along with the balance of systems (but no batteries -- I won't use them) and it comes to about $7500.

    I hate to spend that kind of money on something I probably won't need, but if TSHTF, it could be a life-or-death situation for me, my family, my critters, and the garden.
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    some of us don't have $7500 to spend!
    water will be treated, filtered and boiled.
    as for urbanites, they will be dead long before they can even think of looking for water, 3 days without water and they are history. most people will be too weak from lack of water, and probably food, before that to go further than the end of their street.
     
  8. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Expert Member
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    Water really should be the very first prep, and have plans A, B, and C for how to get more.

    We're pretty 'well' prepared in this regard. Three wells, the main house with a submersible Grundfos pump (110v, run from our inverter or the generator), a pump jack at the guest house (run by electric motor and generator now, but could be manually operated if needed), and the third with just a handpump (just had the leather cups changed and the screen replaced 2 years ago). Two 55 gallon rain barrels on the gutter downspouts, and a creek on public land about 150' from the house. A Big Berkey and a couple smaller filters just in case, and plenty of chems (chlorine and iodine mostly) to disinfect water if needed.
     
  9. Sourdough

    Sourdough "ALASKAN"
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    Me not lucky me looked around and chose this location to move to. I think most people choose to live where they know they will die in a serious SHTF event.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
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  10. Sourdough

    Sourdough "ALASKAN"
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    NOPE......chose this location (in part) because there are no humans here, plus there are dozens of pure fresh water creeks everywhere here.
     
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  11. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    No water= no flushing toilet!!!
    We are off grid, we supply everything ourselves. Tank water fed by gravity to the main house, & composting toilets.

    dfa00396c5f236bb29f82e9753f11136.jpeg
    5000 gallon fed from the cottage roof.
    dfa00396c5f236bb29f82e9753f11136.jpeg
    Two 5000 gallon tanks, the lower one fed from the main house roof, this is then pumped up to the higher tank to gravity feed the house. We have an electric pump powered by solar, but we also have two fire fighting petrol driven pumps. One of these pumps supplies water from Cattail Pond for the gardens.
    dfa00396c5f236bb29f82e9753f11136.jpeg
    1000 gallon tank for the garden fed form part of the main house roof. All tanks overflow into water butts now.
    dfa00396c5f236bb29f82e9753f11136.jpeg
    Cattail Pond in the bottom of Butterfly Valley below the main house.
    If for some reason we were to lose our solar power & the use of the pumps, we can still manually feed the upper water tanks, or we can simply carry the water inside the house for use as we did for 20 years.
    We also have two other 1000 gallon tanks, one is fed from a shed roof for the cottage gardens, the other one will be fed from the garage when it is erected in the near future.
    Keith.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
  12. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Even in desert cities, there will be thousands of gallons of water available, even after the water pumps shut down. The majority of city people will just not know where to look or how to tap these resources.
     
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  13. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Expert Member
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    We are fortunate to have a good well at a moderate depth of 110 feet. I have deep well bucket that I can use if SHTF and this could provide all the water we need to drink/domestic use when electricity goes away. We also have decent rain during the summer that provides for the majority of my agriculture needs. I have one stream that runs through our property that can supplement what I need if we have a dry spell. Also there are a couple springs that produce during the growing season. Water is pretty set, and it’s among the best tasting on the planet!
     
  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I think for many people who have not prepared for leaving if they have to, the problem will be no water in the actual home, & it not being safe outside the home to forage. You have obviously thought about "what if", & are prepared for it. Many would not consider leaving their home no matter what!
    Keith.
     
  15. coffee

    coffee Expert Member
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  16. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    I am a great believer in Mr. Murphy and his desire have fun at my expense. I plan to have my plans fail and then move onto the next plan.

    I have one in my vehicle, in my home and in my BOB. They are an absolute must in my environment and in my plans. Folks also need to know how and where they will be used. Water is were you find it and find it you must.
     
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  17. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    In Southern Appalachia, there is no shortage of rain and I can walk to a river not far from my house. If that puppy dries up, then this planet has died. Not a good thing.

    Having gathered the water, how to purify it becomes the issue. I have both ceramic type (Katadyn) and charcoal type water filters. Speaking of which, I should go buy some more activated charcoal. And you can make your own charcoal. Charcoal gets the bad aromas out ... sorta kinda. Boil this. Keep a bunch of powdered drink mix to help make the water drinkable. Kids will not drink plain ol' water, therefore you MUST add Kool-Aid for the kids. Keep powdered tea, lemonade, grape, fruit punch, ... . Seal these powder packs in glass jars -- toss in desiccant packs and oxygen absorbers before tightening the lids.

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=do+it+yourself+making+activated+charcoal&t=hk&atb=v140-1__&ia=web

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=water+storage+barrels+20+gallon&t=hk&atb=v140-1__&ia=products
     
  18. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=rain+water+gather+tarpaulon&t=hk&atb=v140-1__&iax=images&ia=images

    e6e6ef2b045163736503e70f18b408b2.jpeg

    Rain water run-off from your roof into guttering can be used on your garden. Some university studied whether this water contained chemicals from asphalt roof tiles and would such chemicals hurt anything. Findings were that the water contained precious little contaminating chemicals and what there was in the water didn't even begin to reach hazard levels. So, for gardening, gutter water is just fine. Just don't flood your garden, for heaven's sake -- you gotta brain, use it.

    Do NOT go and pay way too much money for rain barrels. Lord have mercy! Seen those prices?! Holy sh##! We just bought the cheapest we could find. Garbage cans may be impregnated with insecticides, so read literature before purchasing. You can use galvanized steel enclosures that are used by ranchers to feed their cattle. Those things are built well and have standard water take-offs that are threaded for water hoses.
     
  19. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    This is one of the ways I collect water when on treks, I catch the rain from my oilcloth in my kettle.
    Keith.
     
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  20. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I have a spring and a creek on my property that would supply water 12 months out of the year . I can understand people choosing to live where water would be lost in a prolonged loss of electricity , seems most folks plan to used a motorized vehicle to reach a water sustainable location . one problem with this plan most "if they did reach their desired last stand location "would find a hoard of desperate starving people there . Anyone in a starving for food squatter town would find it difficult to survive , being exposed to desperate two legged animals . I would expect such desperate people clusters to be found under bridges and by lakes . Many would sit and starve in their homes from lack of food and water , others will starve or be killed in the squatter towns . The US governments estimate of a ninety percent die off in 12 months if electricity was lost I think is a reasonable estimate .
     
  21. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Expert Member
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    Agreed. A big problem would be these knuckleheads polluting the water source, starting fires, and causing other mayhem. One of the reasons I want to be as isolated as possible from other humans.
     
  22. Bishop

    Bishop Master Survivalist
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  23. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    that's what preppers in the UK think too, of course we have a lower population(than the US) to start with!!
     
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  24. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I don't see water ever being a problem for me and mine. We are surrounded by lakes, ponds, rivers and springs in the wet season. I have a free flowing spring in my front yard right now. I could dig a well there very shallow and easy. We also have a big cistern that collects water off the roof. 3" of rain will fill it up ( I think it is 2500 gallons) and we average a little over 30" of rain a year here. LOL, Harvey dropped three feet on us and five feet on Houston so last year we had double our average yearly rain fall.
     
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  25. Snyper

    Snyper Expert Member
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    I live "in the country" but still have "city water" from a rural system.

    I have a well that uses a 120 volt pump that plugs into an outlet so it can also be powered by a portable generator.

    I also have a gas powered pump that can pull water from a shallow well or a pond or stream

    We've had power outages of up to 5 days but never lost our water.

    My well is now only used for outside purposes and isn't plumbed into the house, but a few hoses and some fittings could change that if needed.
     
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  26. coffee

    coffee Expert Member
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    What is the names of both your pumps. This is one item I still need to get...a water to get water out of a well that I can carry with me, no matter where I end up.
     
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  27. Snyper

    Snyper Expert Member
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    The gas pump is a "Pacer" similar to this one:
    https://www.amazon.com/PACER-PUMPS-...s&qid=1551219731&s=gateway&sr=8-9&tag=mh0b-20
    dd6c2755918e0d0c11b05320de11899b.jpeg
    The electric one is just a standard 110 volt well pump wired to a plug instead of being hard wired. The same could be done with a 220 using the proper plugs.

    The motor will have a tag telling you the wattage required. You'll need a generator that has about 3 times the running wattage listed to withstand the starting surge.

    Many small, low powered pumps will draw water from shallow wells (25 feet or less).
    You may need to use foot valves to keep them primed.
     
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  28. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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  29. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Water is where you can find it and a Sillcock key can help you find more of it. Very good, inexpensive, prepper item. I have several, stashed away in several locations.
     
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  30. anniew

    anniew Member
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    What is a Sillcock key and what does it do???
     
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  31. CountryGuy

    CountryGuy Master Survivalist
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    Like others we're pretty lucky in that we get about 40" of precip a year in a mix of rain and snow. Last years heavy rains broke records and we ended up with over 60". We are on a well, actually (2). Our house uses a geothermal pump and dump system so one well is the draw well and is used for our domestic water as well as the geo system. the second well is the dump well, so once the water goes thru the geo heat exchanger it's pumped to the dump well. The dump well is a well to the aquifer but has no pump. The head height in both well is around 60' and the total shaft depth is around 120'. I have pieces of 4" PVC pipe and fittings to make a dipper if we need it and I can pull from either well.

    In short term situation we have (3) 60gal hot water tanks we could pull water off. 2 are used for hot water and the third holds preheated hot water off the geo system that feeds into one of the actual heated tanks.

    Outside we have an in-ground pool that holds around 25K gal of water and then there are 2 smaller in ground ponds that probably hold around 400 gal each.

    I have a small rain catch system off our roof that I plan to enlarge this summer. Currently I use it to water the garden. In a full on SHTF I plan to also divert overflow off of that to both the pool and ponds. We have various ways to boil it and I have the components to make a large sand and charcoal filters also. When we get the money I plan to get a Berky filtration system.

    Last ditch there is a small stream about 300 yards from the house that we could get water from but there is a lot of field and dairy pasture runoff into it so would definitely need to filter and boil prior to using and even then unless I ran it thru a berky or other water purifier I'd be hesitant to drink it, maybe more for washing or untreated use it to flush the toilets.
     
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  32. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    It is a small cross shaped box wrench type tool that fits 4 different types of water valve commonly used in domestic water supply. A bit like a radiator bleed key. They can even open some train doors.
     
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  33. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    I live in Wales, our area supplies drinking water to half the population of the uk, getting water is not the problem.
     
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  34. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I live in the great lakes area, lots of water thus far.
     
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  35. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Last I heard randy the Great Lakes in America were badly polluted. I read an article some years ago about people living in the area getting sick from eating the fish. Mind you, I don't think there are many body of waters these days that are not polluted worldwide!
    Keith.
     
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  36. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I know, I was going add that all water would need treatment but thought that could go without saying in a survival forum.
     
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  37. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Agreed, but I only mentioned this because these people were getting cancer. Not sure if boiling that body of water would make any difference if in fact the cancer was caused by the fish caught in the Great Lakes.
    Keith.
     
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  38. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I'm not sure, I live in the northern great lakes and have not heard about that.
     
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  39. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I did a web search on this and the contaminated fish issue is a concern.
     
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  40. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    Anniew: A Sillcock key is a 4 way key used to turn on a faucet. Many commercial buildings have spigots/faucets on the outside, but they don't have a traditional handle like the ones on your house. The handle is removed so only the company has access.

    The sillcock key is usually what you use to turn the water on and off. The four sides are used dependent on the size of the spigot.

    upload_2019-4-1_6-51-24.jpeg

    Hope this helps. Next time you see an outside spigot with no handle it will make sense.
     
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  41. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I'm a master plumber and have a few keys laying about along with curb keys and fire hydrant keys.
     
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  42. NomadWill

    NomadWill Expert Member
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    I'm fortunate enough to be located near a river, and a few lakes. I could easily haul truckloads of water from and to my abode. Although I think once I move i'll get some barrels to store rain water, just to have in case of a SHTF scenario.
     
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  43. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    I have barrels under the eve of my house to catch water for use of non-drinking purposes . A ram pump is in the stage of getting built to pump water up a hill from the spring . It is actually pumping but needs some fine tuning . It is pumping too fast and is outpacing the incoming water source . We will be back on that project in about three weeks . Also have a year around creek . I am preparing for a E.M.P. therefore am not depending on any vehicle to fetch water . I have a solid rubber tire hand cart ready for water hauling , along with water containers to put on the cart . I am looking at long term prepping .
     
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