How Do You Stock Your Car In Event Of An Emergency Situation?

Discussion in 'Newbie Corner' started by Blitz, Jan 9, 2020.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Hi everyone.

    Question. What items do you recommend to keep in your vehicle, in the event you are caught in an emergency, such as a bushfire, severe flooding, etc?

    At present, I only have a first aid kit, water and a snatch strap and some good compression bandages in the glovebox in case of snakebites. I usually have a shovel as well, but it often gets taken out and doesn't get put back in the vehicle.

    I think I should work out what to keep permanently in the vehicle, as I do a fair amount of 4WD'ing and have been somewhat slack and naive. After the bushfires in our area though, I feel I seriously need to address something better.

    Any advice would be great. Thanks.
     
    Caribou and TMT Tactical like this.
  2. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I also prep for flash flood, and I also happen to be amateur offroader. There are several aspect that you need to address other than supply, and from my previous experience having supplies in hand is the easiest part.
    • Where & How you park your vehicle. Park your vehicle at open ground away from any tree or utility pole if it on ground level, or park it in elevated structure (parking building). If you also worry about shallow depth earthquake than always park it at open ground away from any tree or utility pole.
    • Have ABC class Fire Extinguisher, and make sure in size that you could handle personally (weight). If its too small than get 2 of them in your vehicle. If your not worry about bushfire or merely prepping for flood, than get BC class Fire Extinguisher instead.
    • Sufficient amount of Hard Cash. In any major SHTF expect service disturbance of banking / payment infrastructure, which mean everybody will fall back to using hard cash / banknote as legal tender.
    • Dwelling / Shelter. Consider where you going to stay if you need to evacuate. My current practice is I have 2 dwelling / residence in the same city and I spend half the week at each of them or as necessity arise. Also learn to sleep in your vehicle, just keep in mind to always have all the door windows ¼ open for air circulation.
    • Fuel. This depend on your vehicle cruising range, you should test yourself how far your vehicle could go at ½ filled tank. Also have extra fuel in a sealed metal can (not sure if you have something like that that there)
    • Water. For filling radiator (if needed) or for sanitary usage, but NOT for drinking, keep them separated.
    • Power Inverter. Having this enable you to safely charging your electronic using the vehicle electrical system (engine). Trust me you going to need one.
    • Your mental & physical health. This is something I've recently learn myself. Having all the materials, training, and experience will be in feint if your own health isn't up for it.
    For consumption supply (food, drinking water, ettc) have them all in duffel bag or any other bag that is practical enough for you. And also have 20l - 35l capacity backpack that will be filled with critical supply, materials.
    • Shelf stable foods & beverages (things that only need to add hot water). You need to determine the amount yourself and see what work best for your need.
    • Drinking water (4L / day), and portable water purification for redundancy. Remember you also carry that water for filling up your radiator and for sanitary use.
     
    howler, Rebecca and TMT Tactical like this.
  3. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Thanks Varuna, top post!

    What stood out for me was your suggestion of a fire extinguisher. I've got two brand new ones in the house, but not in the car. Stupid really, considering years ago our 4WD burst into flames whilst parked in a village. (Something to do with the air con, I can't remember now).

    The other really pertinent point is having cash. We've had seriously bad bushfires here and thousands of people were stranded for days until the Navy could evacuate them. Those who did try to evacuate by car before the roads were closed were unable to buy fuel because the internet was down and they could only pay with cash, which most people didn't carry. Those stranded waiting for the Navy to evacuate them couldn't purchase food, which lead to a lot of looting. So yeah, a really good timely reminder.

    My husband always had an inverter in the car, but unfortunately since his death, it disappeared from the shed.

    I'm pretty paranoid about fuel, so I always make sure I have at least 1/2 a tank. During the bushfires, the local shop/fuel provider had to limit fuel for residents, as the fireys needed it. In other parts of the country affected by the fires, garages ran out of fuel due to road closures and tankers unable to get in to refill.

    Thanks again for an informative post.
     
    TMT Tactical and Caribou like this.
  4. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
      250/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I made a recent trip through remote Canada in poor weather. I had 3+ days of food, water, warm clothing, blanket, space blanket, space blanket sleeping bags, tools, fire starter, tow strap, jumper battery, spare fuel, multiple flashlights, shovel, more. This was for a 13 hour trip. The clothing included 3 warm coats, multiple pairs of gloves, and a fur hat. Placement is important. Being able to reach your emergency materials without getting out of the vehicle is critical.
     
    Rebecca and TMT Tactical like this.
  5. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Oh yes, I hadn't thought about a blanket. Plus a fire blanket. Thanks for the post. Guess what I'm going to be doing over the weekend? Yep, you guessed right, hahahaha!
     
    Caribou and TMT Tactical like this.
  6. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    If your also prepping for bushfire, than you need two 5 lbs / 2 Kg size ABC class fire extinguisher. And get someone to properly stowed it in your vehicle (hopefully there is enough room)

    Around here power inverter + installation only cost less than €50. I highly suggest you have someone to install them properly (unless you happen to be automotive technician)

    Do they sell fuel in portable packaging there? Something such as these :confused: ;

    90f7cb5db80e2a2f60f03039827a9ecb.png

    90f7cb5db80e2a2f60f03039827a9ecb.png
     
    Rebecca and TMT Tactical like this.
  7. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Blitz,

    Consider adding a fluorescent safety vest or jacket.

    Consider adding the best work gloves appropriate to your situation and anticipated risk environment.

    Consider carrying a multiple-use pole in your vehicle.

    If I anticipated getting caught up in something like a northern California wild fire, I'd have a hard hat with face shield in vehicle at all time.
     
    Rebecca and TMT Tactical like this.
  8. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Not sure what the fire extinguishers in the house are, or if they are suitable. In any case, I'll still need to have them inside, meaning I'll have to purchase another couple for the vehicle.

    Re inverter. Yes, husband fitted it himself in our "bush" 4WD. But after a couple of years of severe bush bashing, it ended up too wrecked for him to bother fixing, so it went to the scrappy. Hence the inverter ended up in shed (and subsequently disappeared). The 4WD we imported from the UK which I now drive doesn't have one fitted unfortunately.

    Portable fuel? I've never heard of it. Interesting. I'll investigate.

    Thanks for the tips. Much appreciated.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  9. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Some more good suggestions, thanks.

    What do you mean by a "multiple-use pole"?

    It's going to be interesting fitting everything in the vehicle. Does anyone have any pics of their vehicles, with all their equipment? If so, I'd love to see them. Once I get my girl organised, I'll try and post one.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  10. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Blitz,

    A multi-use pole would be something good for walking with, repelling a rabid animal, using it to reach something dropped in bushes but not safe to use hands, ... many other uses as situations dictate.

    My basic pole in my pickup truck is a 10 ft (~ 3 and a third meter) fiberglass Firefighters pike pole. There are telescoping versions extending to 30 ft (~ 10 m) but one must be strong, robust and healthy. Mine collects dust in the barn.
     
    Caribou and TMT Tactical like this.
  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I keep an emergency bag(also known as a get home bag) in the car AT ALL TIMES, with anything I think i'll need including a first aid kit, maps, compass, food and water, flashlight etc.
     
    Rebecca and TMT Tactical like this.
  12. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Brilliant, thanks. Another good idea :)

    The only pole I have in the back of the car is a short pole to keep the bonnet up, hahahaha! I'll have to have a look and see what I can find.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  13. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Thanks lonewolf. I hope there's a good reference to using a compass on this site. I used to be able to use one many moons ago, but I can't remember how to orientate a topo map. Anyway, that's for another post.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I use a wooden staff for walking on uneven ground and in the woods, wife uses a metal hiking pole but I don't like them.
     
    Blitz and TMT Tactical like this.
  15. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    depends how good one's map reading skills are, I use a compass just to put me in the general direction I need to go, most times I don't even need the compass.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  16. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    My map reading is fairly okay. The only time I've really used a compass was when I did scuba training years ago, as it was part of the course. But in a practical sense, I've never really used one. I thought it would be a good skill to master however, especially as I tend to spend so much time 4WD'ing in the bush. I'd like to be able to orientate a compass to the map, and be able to successfully go from point "A" to point "B" using a compass. My husband did give me a refresher a few years before he died, but in all honesty, it went in one ear and out the other, as it was something I never saw the need to use and it's just never interested me. Wish I'd paid more attention now.
     
    TMT Tactical, Caribou and lonewolf like this.
  17. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Regarding going offroad. A 4WD vehicle mean it only use 4WD when necessary and even that has speed limit. And I've notice you lived in downunder, which mean the majority of the ground surface are pretty solid rock and there isn't much need of going with 4WD. And driving offroad require different driving skill and awareness compare to driving on paved surface.

    BTW just curious what is your diving certification /qualification?
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  18. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    My truck always has everything that I would need to either get home on foot or head out into the woods to hide. I cover all of the bases. Shelter, food, water, a pot, warm clothing, weapons, tools, fishing gear, hunting and trapping, medical kit, maps and compasses, more ways to make a fire than you can imagine, cards & dice, a book.

    When possible I try to use items that can cover things in more than one area. The Cold Steel trenching shovel gives you a way to dig in, it is a lethal battle-ax and you can chop wood with it. I like the Sawyer Mini for a water filter. it can be used in several ways. My AR-7 with a 25 round magazine is a good small game gatherer and protection. A tube tent can be set up as a tent or used as a sleeping bag. A sword type machete has a lot of uses. If you want a small one the Cold Steel bowie is small enough to use as a knife but still big enough to chop small trees for firewood. A polled hawk is also a good choice.

    I have all of my stuff in an older Alice pack behind the seat on the floor. for food I go with lifeboat rations. Food isn't an immediate concern for me if I need to I can go a week or two without. The lifeboat rations will keep me going for a month at least. 3 X 3600 calorie blocks are 4 weeks basic needs for me. That and whatever I find while on the move will get me home.

    Don't forget the little things. If it is summer and hot you need a hat. If you are going to be walking every day you need extra socks. Personal hygiene is important both for health and psychological reasons. As is the outside so often so is the inside.

    Put a lot of thought into your go-bag. It needs to reflect the territory you will be in. Cold, hot, wet or dry your needs will vary in their specifics but in the end, you need to cover the basics. Shelter, water, food, fire, and security...
     
    TMT Tactical, Caribou and Rebecca like this.
  19. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    it is very unlikely I will be on foot in an emergency, its possible so I plan for it, my vehicle is serviced and reliable, I keep the fuel tank topped up , in an emergency if I cannot use main roads I can use back country lanes which only locals use, so I keep the supplies in my emergency bag to a minimum but it still carries a lot of stuff, if I did have to walk home I don't want to have to carry big heavy loads, the idea is to travel light.
     
    TMT Tactical, Blitz and Rebecca like this.
  20. Rebecca

    Rebecca Expert Member
      178/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good day Blitz,

    Apart from all the bigger and very good suggestions here already, and apart from a dedicated GHB as mentioned by Lonewolf, I keep quite a few EDC (every day carry) items in the door pocket of my vehicle. Things like a knife, flashlight, lighter, paracord, work gloves.

    This is just so that for the small things I don't have to go into the bags or back of the vehicle. It may sound lazy but just makes life quicker. For example there are often branches across the road brought down by wind or snow.. just grab the gloves out the door and pull the branch off the road. Rather than digging around in a bag for a while. Works for me anyway :)
     
    TMT Tactical, Blitz and lonewolf like this.
  21. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I've been driving off road for about 30 years, so am well versed with off road driving. My vehicle is constant 4WD, meaning I only need to engage low range when necessary. It depends on where you drive, weather conditions, etc, as to the ground surface. The majority of the ground surface isn't solid rock, it ranges from rocky ground (which is usually in patches, depending where you go) to forest type tracks that become muddy and rutted. The majority of tracks where I live are steep dirt tracks that become muddy and rutted due to rain and very slippery, with some rocky patches. Also, when you do encounter "solid rock" that's when you especially need to engage 4WD, as the surface isn't flat and smooth like a paved surface, you encounter rock steps and sometimes sizeable loose rocks.

    The following links are a couple of trips my husband and I did with some friends which will give you an idea of the type of tracks, showing rock driving and rutted dirt tracks. There are pretty old videos but I don't have access to more recent videos at present, only a few that were posted on the net.







    I have Padi Open Water diving certification.
     
    TMT Tactical and varuna like this.
  22. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    It isn't the dependability of the vehicle that the go kit is for. If my truck were to break down I would call a wrecker and they would take me and my truck home. My concern is more along the line of some sort of systemic failure. An EMP with enough power might knock out the car's electronics and make calling for help a not possible sort of thing. I also have seen Houston traffic lock up SOLID just because it was a holiday weekend. If this was caused by some sort of panicked evacuation staying with the truck might not be a good decision at all. Sometimes survival is for those that act first and fast.

    I usually do most of my own mechanic work and have done some rather serious mechanics work in parking lots or on the side of the road. I have a pretty well-supplied truck. I even carry a spare set of belts, wires, and hoses in my toolbox in the back. I pulled out a rear axel and replaced my rear wheel bearings in a parking lot one afternoon in order to get home. Fortunately, there was a parts house and a shop nearby that allowed me to use a press to press off and on the new bearings. Mechanic work is one of the things that I have done for a living at times. I usually get about 300,000 miles out of a truck.

    It is possible that we are talking about a difference in scale. Texas is big and we don't think twice about traveling fairly large distances on a regular basis. I personally have twice worked jobs that involved a 90-mile trip each way to and from work. My wife is now working 60 miles from home. We regularly drive up to 100 miles just to go shopping or to see a specialist doctor. There are places in Texas where kids travel for two or more hours each way every day to and from school. A light load might be ok for a little 25 or 30 mile walk but if you are going to be several days walking through possible disaster areas then you need better than a pocket knife and a few small things.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  23. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Yes, I totally agree Rebecca. I also carry such items in the door pocket of my vehicle, though I only presently keep gloves, torch and lighter. I can't tell you the number of times through the years getting caught in precarious driving situations where having to dig through the back of the vehicle to find things was a total pain in the rump. We initially learned this lesson many, many years ago when we got stuck in a very deep mud hole. We couldn't access the rear of the vehicle to get the recover gear out. After that, my husband used an ammo box with all the necessary recovery gear on the outside of the vehicle, which made access much quicker and easier.

    Paracord is a great idea. I've got heaps of it as my husband was a paratrooper and used it for all manner of things, but haven't thought of keeping it handy. Thanks for the post. :)
     
    TMT Tactical and Rebecca like this.
  24. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    It's difficult to plan for every contingency. And of course, it depends on the individual situation at the time. I wouldn't like to be on foot in an emergency, but you never know what life's going to throw at you.
     
    TMT Tactical and Rebecca like this.
  25. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
      160/173

    Blog Posts:
    0
    A bug out bag, an extra knife, cordage, duct tape, TP, first aid kit, and extra water, ALWAYS!
     
    TMT Tactical, Blitz and Caribou like this.
  26. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    What's "TP"? Yeah, duct tape would be a good one to throw in.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  27. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
      160/173

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Toilet paper! I crush a roll and stuff one behind the driver's seat and one in the glove box
     
    TMT Tactical and Caribou like this.
  28. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Hahahaha! Yes of course!
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  29. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
      160/173

    Blog Posts:
    0
    ;)
     
  30. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Get a BIG fire extinguisher. Had one too small. Guy's truck on fire, engine fire, several men had stopped to help, whipped-out pussy fire extinguisher, it went, "Pffffffffffffffffttt" and that was that. Guy sez, "Think it will start back up?!" I say, "Hell yes!!!!" then the flames lept back. We formed a bucket brigade with a 5-gal bucket. Got the fire out, even though you should NEVER use water against a fuel fire / engine fire.

    If you are out in the wilds, you need a winch, steel cable all that. Have real rope or real chains. And have lengths over 50 feet -- especially if you are up in the mountains. Let's say you can't get your truck out, well you CAN keep it from rolling down a slope, bumpity, bumpity, bump until you can get an extraction vehicle back in there.

    I often have 3/4" Manila anti-rot treated rope, plus other rope diameters and sizes. In winter, often have a length of heavy chain with hooks and other connector gear for chain applications. If using paracord, don't just buy any kind; buy only military grade.
    https://atwoodrope.com/products/parapocalypse

    Always I carry a tarpaulin with brass eyes about its periphery.

    I keep a pulley and grappling hook in the vehicle, plus all manner of sh##. Have a 4' crowbar, limb saw, short axe, folding shovel, ..., fire starters and other fire sh##. Gotta tire inflation pump that plugs into vehicle power. Jumper cables, water filter, ...

    Got space blankets. Blood clotting packs, C.A.T. tourniquet, ...

    Spare coat, watch cap, gloves, blanket, ...

    My SUV toolbox is like 2-ft wide, a foot tall and wide = one heavy s.o.b.

    Fires in the wilderness? You're screwed, but maybe not. Get a fire hood, maybe even a make-do fire/radiant suit. Gotta keep from inhaling toxic smoke while getting out'a danger -- can't be coughing your lungs out and too, you can damage your lungs permanently. A fire suit can protect you from the radiant heat ... at least for a little while. If pines are alight 300 yards away, the heat will bake your skin and melt your eyebrows. Catching radiant heat from a good distance away is still like being near an open oven.

    Taping something that will be exposed to real heat, then duct tape must be the type that is used for HOT applications.
    https://www.amazon.com/3M-High-Temperature-Flue-15-Foot/dp/B00004Z4DS
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/FiberFix-Heat-Wrap-For-Exhaust-Pipes-and-High-Temp-Repairs/47657143

    I carry too much crap, but then again maybe I don't. I drive through mountainous region and state forest every day. Seen all manner of bad happen to others. I've gotten stuck, seen others get stuck, helped them, they've helped me.

    So far, I've not carried liquor nor a suicide revolver. Bear gets too close, you can't kill it, so just put the gun in your own mouth to prevent unimaginable suffering. Even if you live, the critter may have crushed your skull, torn off your junk, made you have to poop in a bag the rest of your life. Forget that! "Git'r'done!"
     
    TMT Tactical and Blitz like this.
  31. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    an EMP is the only situation where I think I might have to walk home, during the winter months I am no more than 25 miles away in any direction, in the summer we go further maybe 100 miles from home, but what I carry in my "emergency bag" would get me home no matter where I am, its a little bit more than a few bits and bobs but not too heavy if I have to walk out.
     
    TMT Tactical and Blitz like this.
  32. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    I think that my truck backpack kit weighs about 25 pounds. When you are a 225-pound man that isn't much of a load. I am the original Boy Scout and took the "Always be prepared" motto to heart. Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. there are actually several possible situations that could end up with me walking home or camping out on the side of the highway for several days. You can't imagine how bad a hurricane can mess up the roads and highways in a heavily forested place. I have seen the roads blocked for days on end, no power so no fuel, long traffic jams that don't move for days. Most of my stuff in these kits is actually fairly light. A tube tent or two weigh almost nothing as do mylar space blankets. Probably the majority of my weight will be in food, water, weapons, and tools. The AR-7 weighs 2.5 pounds. The Cold Steel shovel weighs 1.5 pounds and covers a shovel for digging. a battle-ax, and a hatchet. I like to have that in case I get stuck or need to clear a path.

    There are a lot of differences between Texas and Wales. In the event of almost any catastrophic problem, EVERYBODY will be well-armed here. While Texas is big it is still just a state. We are a massively diverse population here with lots of Hispanic people and lots of black people. The "White" people are from all nations. We generally get along pretty well but in times of stress, things are more likely to get ugly. Wales has a population of about 3 million. Texas has 27 million. In the event of a societal collapse, we have a somewhat different situation.

    If you have to walk home through a world that is falling apart in Texas you don't want to be unarmed. For me, that means a long gun a handgun, a sheath knife and some sort of big cutter. I don't even count a handgun as a part of my get home kit. I always have a handgun. If things are totally messed up I will probably travel mostly at night. I have wolf eyes and see better in the dark than most people. At night I don't have to worry as much about being ambushed.
     
    TMT Tactical and Blitz like this.
  33. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Wales? I wonder why you mentioned Wales.
    most people over here drive on main roads and motorways, that's when the traffic would build up, I don't drive on motorways unless its early in the morning, no way to get off if you get stuck, so I stick to minor roads and unclassified country roads, if there is an obstruction-tree down say- I can always turn around and go another way-cant do that on motorways.
    the car is my weapon, anyone tries to stop me in a SHTF event and I drive over the top of them!!
     
    TMT Tactical, Blitz and Caribou like this.
  34. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    Sorry, a brain fart.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  35. Alaskajohn

    Alaskajohn Master Survivalist
      282/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I always travel well stocked. In addition to the common items already mentioned, I never travel without a chainsaw. I’ve had to use it twice this winter to clear felled trees. When you are 100 miles from nowhere, no one else is going to clear the tree for you. I also travel with a heavy jacket, snow pants, Arctic boots and a heavy blanket and snowshoes in the winter. Never had to use these, but the time you need them and you don’t have them, you’d be in a world if shit.
     
  36. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      380/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    This particular pack is very interesting, since it can be converted into seat backpack

     
    TMT Tactical and Blitz like this.
  37. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    no problem, i'm not far from Wales as the crow flies but I don't live there.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  38. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    I know I just was thinking of two things at the same time and let my Typing run out ahead of my brain.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  39. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Now that's what I call a backpack! Wouldn't mind one of those.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  40. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Hey, Wales is due north of Devon across the Bristol channel.

    I'm looking at ferry boat routes and don't see routes crossing the Bristol channel to connect Devon and Wales. By ferry boat you'd have to go to Ireland, THEN back over to Wales. Simpler to take the land roads around the Bristol Channel. The M4 and M48 cross that channel via big bridges just north of Bristol and east of Newport.

    I would't'God like to know where in England my dad was stationed during WWII. I'll ask him in the next world. We talked one time during one of my vivid dreams. Such conversations are extraordinarily fleeting due to the near-impossible task of creating a link. Therefore, we couldn't just chat. When the communications between this world and that world breaks, it's like being torn apart by hurricane-force gales = NOT pleasant. Holding on to the link takes all of the power of your soul, then stretch/BANG it's gone. And it is BRIGHT over there, almost blinding. Better when the departed come to you; even then, the connection is super brief. I'll just wait until this body gives out. This meat-puppet life is getting distinctly unpleasant. I've got some things to do I guess or God would've put me out like a cigarette.

    When watching a TV show set in Wales, we put the subtitles on, else I can't understand much of what they are saying ... when they are theoretically speaking in English!
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  41. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Yes Wales is north of Devon across the Bristol Channel, there used to be ferries that ran in the summertime from places like Ilfracombe i'm not sure if that is the case, its a long way by road via Bristol and the Severn Bridge.
    a lot of tv programmes from wales speak in.....WELSH.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  42. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon all,

    A question within a possible question:

    May I ask about a question regarding a matter that might involve the initially posed question by Blitz ?

    When planning a load-out for a vehicle for emergency evacuation use involving eg severe flooding, fires etc, ...

    Are there any Preppers who ask themselves about every load-out item for a possible vehicle abandonment with plans to proceed FLC - Feet, Leather Covered - in walking/hiking mode ?

    Although in the history of motor vehicles used in emergency evacuations, it's never happened, there is a slight possibility of vehicle failure because of severe flooding, fires, car crashes, air conditioning not working , ..

    Some packed equipment, supplies and provisions continue the trip in infantry style, non-mechanized.

    Again, are there any Preppers who factor this in ?
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  43. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    One of the problems that some preppers make is that they sort of pick one or two things that they are going to prepare for. That is in part why I prefer the survivalist mentality. A prepper prepares for specific possible problems. A survivalist prepares to survive in ANY situation because their focus is more towards knowledge and personal abilities than just the accumulation of things.

    I have had to evacuate or prepare for that possibility several times. When I do this I have things in a layered plan. For one thing, if I am trying to get out of a low lying place when a hurricane is coming in my aim is to get to high ground. My second stage it to hopefully get to someplace where I can either be with family or in a motel. BUT all too often traffic can lock up and you will not be able to get totally there. I always have a tent and light camping supplies so that if we get stuck someplace we can ride out the storm in our vehicle then just camp until the roads clear. The camping stuff is in a backpack in case the place where the traffic trapped us is not a safe place to be we can walk out to a better place.

    This is how I was taught to do this by my Dad. He called it being self-sufficient. That means that your plan is to take care of yourself in any eventuality rather than hope someone else will show up to help you.
     
    varuna, Blitz and TMT Tactical like this.
  44. Blitz

    Blitz Master Survivalist
      332/345

    Blog Posts:
    0

    To me, this is just common sense. Or perhaps it's from years and years of extensive camping and 4WD'ing in remote locations.

    We used to have a permanent set up, with fridge, stove, tent, solar, etc, including a drawer system that was kept in the back of the 4WD permanently with food and cooking utensils, etc. If we did get stuck somewhere, we always had everything we needed until we could extricate ourselves. We could have lived in the vehicle indefinitely without too many problems. (Obviously food and water would run out after a couple of weeks).

    We had to evacuate from the bushfires recently, and I threw the swags in the back, along with camping supplies just in case we were unable to get to the nominated evacuation centre for whatever reason.

    In case of air conditioning not working? There's no way I'd be abandoning my vehicle just because the air conditioning failed, I can tell you! (I'm sure I must have misunderstood that part of your post).
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  45. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon TexDanm,

    Here, too, the layered approach is used.

    One quick illustration; Gallon jugs of water in non-flimsey containers AND some half-liter water bottles to place on belt or a messenger type bag (like an American Tourister flight bag [ various types depending on perceived situation]).

    My layered approach addresses all realistic hazards, all realistic situations.

    Perhaps we need a thread to discuss the distinctions of the Prepper philosophy and the survivalist philosophy. We've got people here who think they will replenish their initial inadequate food supplies by fishing in the Chesapeake Bay. Surprises await them if they're not already cuisine for the crabs.
     
    Blitz and TMT Tactical like this.
  46. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon Blitz,

    Only partially misunderstood ......

    In this area of the upstart colonies, there is little "common sense".

    This place has changed.

    In an emergency some people here will stop to load up on beer, thinking that the traffic will not increase to the congestion level.
     
    Blitz and TMT Tactical like this.
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Industrial Farming Of Livestock News, Current Events, and Politics Jun 2, 2020
"the Stockdale Paradox" Mental Preparedness May 21, 2020
Woodstock; Hk Flu Vs. Covid-19 News, Current Events, and Politics May 16, 2020
Flour Stockpiling Other Homesteading Apr 9, 2020
Stockpiling Behavior News, Current Events, and Politics Apr 1, 2020
Strategic National Stockpile (public Health Stuff) News, Current Events, and Politics Mar 21, 2020
Grocery Clerks (& Stockers) Are Emergency Workers News, Current Events, and Politics Mar 19, 2020
"stockpiling 'preppers'" News, Current Events, and Politics Mar 18, 2020
Preppers' Stockpile Advice Other Advanced Survival Skills Mar 5, 2020
Coronavirus Stock Market..survival Guide News, Current Events, and Politics Mar 4, 2020

Share This Page