Is propane allowed?

Discussion in 'All Resources About Fire' started by cluckeyo, May 23, 2016.

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  1. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    My thoughts on fire: always carry and bic lighter and and a jet boil. But of course study how to do it the hard way too, just in case. A jet boil is a great tool to have. It is fast and compact, and the small canister of fuel lasts a long time and stores away inside the vessel. Very reliable. We bought ours for hiking but now not hiking so much. We keep it stored in the kitchen and when the power goes out, we still use it to boil water.
     
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  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    in survival you use what you can get hold of.
    i see no point in rubbing sticks together to start a fire when you've got a disposable lighter in your pocket.
    K.I.S.S.......keep it stupidly simple.
    when your cold, wet and hungry you need to get that fire going pronto, there are no marks for how you do it, simple ways are the best.
     
  3. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I think it all depends on the situation cluckeyo. If you have lighters & matches, fine, take them with you. They don't take up much room & weigh little. As you say, just make sure that you have a primitive back-up like flint & steel.
    Fuel stoves sound great, & at the home or retreat or camping they are great. But if you are bugging out, just make sure that you are not replacing vital supplies by carrying the fuel stove & fuel. No matter how many group/family members you have, if you are on foot, there is ALWAYS more important stuff to be carried than a fuel stove. If you are in a vehicle, good, take it.
    Keith.
     
  4. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    your absolutely right, Keith.
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  5. mr_zippehead

    mr_zippehead New Member
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    If you are going to buy a stove for survival purposes, you would be better off to get one which can use different type of fuel. I saw one used by backpackers, it could use naphtha, diesel or gasoline. That way it will be easier to get more fuel for your stove when it runs out.
     
  6. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Fuel when shtf where you going to get fuel ? Wood every where fire. Cook anything bics are good but go empty after while dont forget a flint and steel they will never let you down watch ads from harbour freight simple purchase of anything with coupon they will give you one free
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    at the very basic I've got a Hobo stove, right up to gaz(propane) cylinders, if things go the way I envisage it wont take long for all the propane to be used up, then we'll be back to doing it by simple means.
    you can make a fire basket out of the drum of a washing machine.
     
  8. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    I have camp stoves yes they are nice work well but myfavorite is a charcoal grill it has four legs that are removeable that allso hold the grill up off coals or fire its small compact little thing i found in trash at lake fishing years ago this thing has cooked many good meals over the year use sticks and wood found on ground its simple but works well
     
  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    absolutely, keep it simple.
     
  10. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    For fire lighting I have
    A zippo plus spares and fuel!
    Several bic lighters
    Flint and steel
    A stainless steel fire piston with char!
    a steel tinder box that I refresh every fire
    A solar rechargeable Zapper/tazer thingy
    AND a kindling bag!

    Each of my S/S waterbottles has a s/s cup and cooker fitted!
    that's about it for the BOB !
     
  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I have 150+ disposable lighters!
    spark strikers.
    flint and steel
    and a bag of kindling( silver birch bark, pine cones and slivers of wood).
     
  12. melissa

    melissa New Member
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    I think I've used just about everything to get the fire going and now I'm considering using a propane torch and I'm wondering if anyone else does or has done this. I have been using a Bernzomatic torch but even that I need to have kindling wood, start small and build up. I can usually get a good fire going and a rolling boil within 30 minutes. The propane torch is so intense I'm thinking a couple of minutes of full flame will ignite just about anything and get a full fire going with dry wood. I've seen videos of people starting fires with the propane torch but I'm wondering if anyone here has used one in the firebox.

    This year I'm getting new air tight arch (the fan will not be hooked up this year) and I'm planning on bricking just the firebox and using several layers of ceramic blanket throughout. My understanding is that without all the bricks that heat is not "wasted" heating them and that the insulation will keep it under the pan so start up and shut down should be faster and dependent on the fire. That's why I'm trying to determine what is the best way to get a full fire going. Is the torch the best way to go or am I missing something?
     
  13. Rere

    Rere New Member
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    If you are going to buy a stove for survival purposes, you would be better off to get one which can use different type of fuel. I saw one used by backpackers, it could use naphtha, diesel or gasoline. That way it will be easier to get more fuel for your stove when it runs out.
     
  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    I think if we are talking cooking in the house, then gas is the way to go. Liquid fuels are too dangerous. If we are talking outside the house, then you don't need a stove at all.
    Keith.
     
  15. remnant

    remnant Expert Member
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    We use parcedin stoves which are easy to use and economical. There used to be pressure stoves using paraffin but they are scarce to find except secondhand ones made in Germany and there are hugely effective.
     
  16. jeager

    jeager Expert Member
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    I have a small one burner camp stove I FOUND in g-friend basement with 10 spare gas bottles.

    That's do in a pinch.

    At my house I have one of those grills that looks like a steel drum, 'bout 30 gallon one, that
    takes charcoal or wood.
    It has a smaller smoker drum attached.
     

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