Kudzu

Discussion in 'Herbalism - Medicinal, Practical, and other Uses' started by Pragmatist, Jan 27, 2020.

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  1. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon all,

    Just read a letter to the editor mentioning the American South's equivalent of Dutch tulips: Kudzu.

    Letter discusses our kudzu and medical application re diagnosed neuromuscular issues.

    I defer all matters on this to Justin.

    Everything between my dashed lines is an exact quote from a Dennis Nelson appearing in the DAV Magazine of Jan - Feb 2020 (DAV.ORG), page 4.

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    The question we should be asking ourselves is, do we want to discuss all of the avenues that work or do we simply want to add another drug to the mix ? Although I do not condemn the legalization of cannabis and allowance of its use for veterans, we have to include other plants with such a vigorous approach. Kudzu is legal and the external application of such by a licensed myotherapist gets to the root of diagnosed neuromuscular issues. Cannabis is simply a sedative.

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  2. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    I will weigh in, if I am indeed the Justin you were referring to.

    Kudzu, or Japanese Arrowroot, is a brilliant organism that is also known as "the vine that ate the south". I remember seeing fields and fields of it, covering not only other plant life, but fences, cars, building.... While it is invasive plant, if left to its own devices, the plant itself is not quite as bad as the myths of America make it out to be. Not only are there many other invasive plants that wreck far more havoc on North America’s landscape, but it also is slowly declining in growth rate and spread.

    Kudzu is a very useful medicinal plant. It is widely regarded as the go-to plant medicine to counteract addiction to alcohol. When used in this way, less beer is actually consumed. It doesn’t decrease any of the cravings for it, however, so should be used in conjunction with other, addiction fighting systems.

    On a general herbal scale, a tea or tincture of kudzu can be used to treat colds, fevers, muscle pain, dizziness, diarrhea, and upset stomach.

    Kudzu can also reduce ‘bad’ cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, reduce lower back pain improve kidney function, improve vision, decrease blood pressure, improve heart function after a heart attack, improve chest pains, improve brain function after a stroke, and ease menopause. This is due to the chemicalpuerarin contained in the plant. However, in North America, as is common, this, and other helpful herbal medicines are not used or sometimes even available by doctors. Most of its uses in this way are for people that already suffer from painful, sometimes debilitating ailments. When used this way we are talking about actual injections of the puerarin in amounts defined by the ailment.

    All good and great, however, there are possible complications to taking kudzu. It “plays too well with others”. Not only does it grow pretty wild, but medicinally, it gets wild in the system if you take medicines that slow blood clotting, medicines used for diabetes to lower the blood sugar level, and medicines for getting rid of estrogen-sensitive cancers there can be an adverse reaction. Because Kudzu already does these things in and of itself, and very well, when you take it in conjunction with these you are in effect triple-ing down on your meds. The effect can be disastrous.

    1-3 grams of extract taken daily is sufficient for the good stuff, but I would recommend you know what other medications you are taking! I personally drink it by adding it to ginger tea (1 teaspoon dry kudzu powder) about a half our before I do any strenuous exercise routine. But that’s just the way I use it. It is known to reduce body fat and improve exercise performance. Probably due to the fact that increases the amount of sweat you produce while working out.

    My take away with regards to Dennis Nelson’s editorial letter in the “DAV” is that while it is very useful on a minor, herbal scale, one must be very VERY aware of what they are dosing themselves with prior to deciding to use Kudzu. Puerarin can be very dangerous if misused. Kudzu is a very powerful herb. USE CAUTION if you are going to use it in more than a minor way. Yes, it is my herbal medicine cabinet, but like all herbs, I give it the respect it deserves.
     
  3. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    I just posted a link to a good source of the powder on my homepage.
     
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  4. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Kudzu grows so fast that I once had to rescue a homeless man asleep on a park bench. Kudzu had wrapped around him and the bench. He was trapped. As I was cutting the kudzu, it growled at me.

    upload_2020-1-27_22-0-8.png upload_2020-1-27_22-1-7.png upload_2020-1-27_22-2-21.png upload_2020-1-27_22-3-13.png
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  5. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    How hard is it to make this medicinal powder myself? Assuming access to kudzu.
     
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  6. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    Depending on your usage, you have to harvest the proper part of the plant, dry it fully and without any kind of preservatives, then grind it into a fine powder.
     
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  7. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    And thus myths are born! Legends are made! Moonpies are ett!
     
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  8. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    I'm sorry for anyone who visited my site earlier .. I had some HTML mishaps... should be up properly now.
     
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  9. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Justin,

    Thank you for the pharmacopoeia ... I think that's the right word ... info on our tulip-equivalent.

    Of course all treatments require professional health care provider guidance.
     
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  10. Justin Baker

    Justin Baker Expert Member
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    @Pragmatist

    Of course. My pleasure. Since it is one of the herbs I do use, I am happy to chime in.
     
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  11. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    MoonPies are SACRED!

    Notice that in the following Egyptian hieroglyph, the MoonPie has almost been completely ett by this God of theirs. His servants bring more MoonPies.

    b57fc06c0dc1391aee5f120643d9fb75.jpeg
     
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