Make-it-yourself Tiny Survival Kits

Discussion in 'Survival Kits' started by TexDanm, Oct 3, 2017.

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  1. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    Make-it-yourself tiny survival kits

    I have always liked making little kits that I give to friends. My latest run is working especially well I think. I spotted some clear smoothie straws on Amazon recently. These are bigger and a little hevier than regular straws. You can get them in 3/8” and 1/2” size. I got the half inch ones. I cut them into 3 3” pieces from each straw. I use a candle stub and pinch the end of the straw piece with needle nose pliers while I heat the plastic to melting and then slide the pliers forward and pinch it.

    This gives you a little tube sealed on one end that you can put just all manner of things into. Once it is filled you pinch the open end melt it and you have a 3” sealed capsule that is air tight and water proof. I Heat and melt the plastic directly but some people use hemostats that they heat then use to melt and seal. If you use the heated hemostat method you can leave the straw in one piece and have several collections together each sealed into its own part of the straw.

    I have made little fishing kits with hooks, sinkers and fishing line. I bought a box of the strike anywhere kitchen matches and with a piece of sand paper and a couple feet of jute string and 3 to 5 matches sealed instant fire.

    I have also sealed up salt, pepper, garlic powder, Bleach, antibiotic ointment, little sewing kits and various pills in these and other sized clear straws. Since they are well sealed they last for a long time and you can throw them in your pocket or glove box or tool box... They cost almost nothing and I give them to people all the time. For the spices if you cut the end off with scissors you can turn it around and use that cut off piece for a plug.
     
  2. Woodsbum

    Woodsbum Well-Known Member
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    Great idea. Eight to ten fit nice in the Altoids tin for a nice compact kit.
     
  3. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    I like the idea, and I have seen videos of these type of kits.
    But I really question them, not saying that they useless, that would be silly something is always going to be better than nothing..
    I just feel most of them seem more a novelty to me..
    I have done outings for days and days with basically just a knife a ferro rod and a water bottle (so may not be a far stretch for just a tiny tin kit.. I just really dont know if they are as viable..)
    If I am going in with kit I am going in with decent cutting tools and decent container and decent cordage.. etc..
    However.. if you want I gladly vet any small kit out in the field.
     
  4. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    I love ferrocerium rods and they are my go to fire makers. The thing is that a lot of the people that I give my little fits to are of limited experience and nearly anyone can use a match. I also make these little tubes with storm proof matches and those things will build a fire with even slightly wet wood. I am often amazed by people that can't make a fire with a ferro rod. I think that a lot of people don't think small enough when they are putting together their tender nest. For people like this matches or lighters are their only hope. It is mostly for them that I think these are critically important. I carry them in my boat and in the bottom of my various packs as both backup and trade items. The same is equally true of the ones that have hooks, line and sinkers. I think of them as small change trade stock.

    The big thing that these things do is people can throw them in their purses, packs and glove boxes and forget them an if needed they will always be dry and good. I make a lot of small kits and when they are finally done to my satisfaction I do them in a vacuum seal a meal bag. I make quick meals with ramen noodles, dehydrated Vegetables, bouillon cubes and spices and then seal a meal them. They last for years and years.

    I try to think about what will be of value and then make that sort of thing up now. I like my knives but also can see where several hundred of them might be good trade material at some point as well.
     
  5. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    You right about ferro-rods, not many experienced people can use it, or even know how to use it.
    But if they inexperienced, what real use is a tin survival kit ?
    anyway I would like to see your kit man.
     
  6. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    I've watched people that are supposed to have some survival knowledge sitting there just scraping like mad on a ferro rod on a pile of leaves and sticks. One thing that I always have with my ferro rods is a bundle of jute cord. I make little pom-pom looking things out of it and when I want a fire I pluck off a piece and unravel it to make a little nest of smaller than hair fibers. I have all my other stuff ready before I even strike the first spart and it is nearly always a one spark fire. You can actually do the same thing with a sheet of toilet paper but that doesn't look as manly LOL.

    I have several with the magnesium with them but don't really see the point. I make most of my own ferro rod kits and just use that alone. A 1/2" x 6" ferro rod struck with a piece of 1/4" square tool steel or a carbide cutting insert makes a monsterous rain of sparks. I order ferro rods off Ebay for a little of nothing.
     
  7. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    I just use dry grass mostly..
    if that doesn't work well, have a few cotton ball wads in fire kit.
     
  8. TexDanm

    TexDanm Master Survivalist
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    If it is the right kind of grass you can split it down and make a nest that is like a cotton puff and is massively flammable. Unfortunately I've watches people work so hard with very little success trying to get a pile of grass and leaves to catch fire. The secret to getting a fire going with little effort is the use the finest fibers possible for that initial strike.

    Flammability has a lot to do with the surface area to volume ratio in cross section and how much oxygen you can have around it at the moment of ignition. This is why organic dust is so dangerous if it is suspended in the air. I worked in a rice dryer grain mill when I was a kid and we got taught all about that danger. If you stir that dust up and there is a spark it EXPLODES it burns so fast. If you take jute twine and unravel it it is about as flammable as gasoline. I assume that the same would be true of any grass that was fibrous. I have done it with dry pine needles and ended up with something that was that sort of flammable.

    Most of my fero rods that I give away come with a bundle of jute and instructions. I like to make my fires the boy scout way with one strike or match.
     
  9. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    Southern africa for the most part is dry and arid,
    and Our grass is pretty darn fibrous.. so it generally lights super easy,
    if not there are some species of trees bark is also proceeded down into a really good tinder.. I generally never have issue with Ferro-rods, and also have about 80% success ate with bow drill.. so most of the time as long as things are not to wet (after a rain or during a rain, its hardly an issue in my area)
     
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