My Day At The Gun Club.....

Discussion in 'Guns, Knives, Tools, Etc.' started by watcherchris, Mar 7, 2021.

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  1. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Took my electric weed eater and went to the graveyard and cleaned up around some 6 head stones ....as it is going into spring and wanted to get a bit of a jump on this labor of love..in tending to several family members. Trimmed around these headstones and then swept them off. They look much neater and prettier now....


    From there I proceeded to the gun club and taking three firearms in .41 magnum calibration and shot some 60 rounds of 210 grain copper FMJ semi wad cutter bullets and then followed by some lead 250 grain gas checked cast lead bullets.

    Did most of the shooting using a Ruger Blackhawk 6 shot revolver..single action. Now this gun is extensive on the recoil in this calibration...particularly after one has shot some two cylinders worth of this ammunition..it starts to tell on you recoil wise. The recoil is stout in .41 magnum and very stout in the heavier gas checked lead cast bullets....noticeable recoil.
    I was shooting at the 50 yard targets and it took me a bit to figure out the sight picture on this Blackhawk revolver.

    The more manageable recoil with both types of ammunition is in the second gun I used...a Thompson Contender in .41 Magnum. Much easier on the recoil and also the trigger pull....
    Also did not take that many rounds to get on target at 50 yards and more accurately at that..with it's 14 inch barrel.


    Followed by a Henry Rifle also in .41 Magnum this one of course was much much easier in the recoil department....more accurate too at 50 yards but then again it has a longer sight radius.

    I enjoyed taking my time with each of these tools and learning more about handling the .41 Magnum cartridge as I've not done much shooting with this calibration up to now.

    Been looking some time now for a .41 magnum barrel for this Thompson Contender and now I have it..making five such barrels in different calibrations for the Contender pistol.

    I verily like taking my time shooting the Contender as it is a single shot...so you learn to make your shot count..


    Got to talking with a number of Olde Timers at the gun club..

    I like talking with some of those Olde Timers ...many of them have a wealth of gun knowledge and trivia...even history they have lived and experienced..

    I consider their stories/history to be valuable information....their knowledge/experience too.

    I am wealthy for getting to talk with alot of those Olde Timers...



    Will be cleaning guns and sorting out my brass for reloading later tonight...

    And now you know the rest of the story...........................


    My non Ishmaelite .02,

    Watcherchris
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2021
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  2. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Looking forward to again going to the gun club and shooting my Thompson Contender single shot pistol at long range.....

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  3. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I have always felt that single shot guns teach you so much more than other guns. Just knowing that you only have one shot seems to settle and focus you even when you are shooting targets. You become more aware of your sight picture and take your time squeezing off each shot.
     
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  4. Dalewick

    Dalewick Legendary Survivalist
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    I've fired a 44 mag plenty and a 454 Casull. How is the recoil of the 41 in comparison?

    On taking your time on every shot. More people should learn to make every shot count. The motto, "One shot, one kill" for snipers means just what it says. There are many reasons to be a proficient shooter but the best one is your life may depend on it some day.

    Slow is Smooth, Smooth is Fast.... Operational principles to live by.

    Dale
     
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  5. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    I would never say this to an anti-American liberal, but a semi-auto is for people who already know how to shoot. Saying this, I got my first semi-auto at age 12, a Sears and Roebuck .22 rifle, tube fed. I was taught how to shoot correctly, however. Then in high school, it was the issued target rifles and a retired battalion sergeant major (Army Intel, combat infantry) on my six o'clock.

    Were I a gun store owner, I'd do my best to talk a new firearm owner out of getting a semi-auto centerfire rifle. I want people to get really good with their weapons. Repeating rifles are necessary in this age of sub-human looting & arson bands -- same for shotguns, people need high capacity pump shotguns. Repeating arms need not be ammo-eating semi-autos. And here's another thing, deer rifles are by-god lethal. Hit a humerus, the arm comes off. Hit a femur, the leg comes off. For short range, I like BLUNT bullets out of rifles and handguns. Their hydrostatic shock factor results in tissue exploding. Handguns are good as a backup tool for your killing machine. A blunt-nosed round from some ancient lever-action deer rifle will drop a man like a wet dish-rag if that bullet arrives center-mass. You just can't say that about most handguns -- to include the .45 Auto. Magnum handguns begin to enter the realm of rifle performance.
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  6. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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  7. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    .41 gel expansion, then the .41 vs watermelon -- now that is fun stuff

    Gel expansion is good science. But hey, fast forward into watermelon land for happiness sake. That starts at 2 min 5o seconds.

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  8. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    One advantage of being a volunteer at the rifle range is I get offered a chance to shoot many different firearms. Last Saturday a fellow member offered to let me shoot his 44 mag. pistol. That time I politely declined, as I had watched him shoot it. Massive recoil. If I ever get a 44 mag, pistol, it will have ported barrel and probably a compensator too. I am not very big or muscular (5'11"- 150 lbs) so I don't need a knot on my forehead from a recoiling pistol.
     
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  9. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Exactly TexDanm....precisely!!!

    This is what I first learned shooting my .50 caliber Hawken Black Powder Rifle.....,you only get one shot.....and reloading is not such an rapid event...so make it count.

    I also learned quickly that black powder firearms are not weak toys....particularly in .50 calibration...they hit hard within their limits.

    Only later did I get my first Thompson Contender single shot in .223 calibration....and learned over time that the .223 is lacking in energy delivery....for certain applications.

    And this is what got me into looking at the 7mm TCU ...in necking up a .223 case to accept as 7mm .284 diameter bullet.


    Now.......I did purchase a .35 Remington Barrel for my Contender..but Wow!!!! Talk about being a glutton for punishment...you guys think the .44 Magnum has stout recoil.....try the Contender in .35 Remington. I no longer shoot this calibration much... What was I thinking..???
    I put a red dot on the .35 Remington Barrel now but have not shot it as of yet. Wondering if the Red Dot will survive the Recoil. The previous Thompson Contender 4 power scope did not survive the recoil on this .35 Remington Calibration.

    I prefer the 7mm TCU.....much much easier on the recoil...

    But yes...between those two firearms....Black powder and this Contender...it taught me to slow down and take my time...not get in a hurry.


    Oh...and a footnote here...on the Henry Rifle....

    This Contender is the second Contender I have owned....and both have very very nice trigger pulls on them from the factory...

    Very little mechanical take up when the hammer is thumbed back...single action...and then very light clean and crisp hammer fall....clean break and then very little overtravel. This has become a sort of standard by which I now judge many trigger pulls.

    A very nice trigger pull can spoil you .

    What happened at the range...yesterday is that I became very aware of how heavy the trigger pull is on this .41 Magnum Henry rifle as compared to the Thompson Contender..
    Even heavier than the BlackHawk pistol.


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2021
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  10. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Decades at the range gives us stacks of stories, doesn't it!

    Meet a seemingly nice guy at the range. Has a .44 mag that his brother'n'law gave him; single action, plowshare grips. So far, I've not raised an eyebrow. Let's me shoot it before he himself shoots it. Now this is the point where I should have raised an eyebrow, but no, I'm lusting after the revolver not thinking about the intentions of my new acquaintance. I put a few rounds through it, then eject them. Primers tell me that these are reloads. The revolver rocked back as one would expect, .44 and all, but those plowshare grips let the beast roll in the hand, not slam the hand. Only later did it dawn on me that I was the guinea pig, the "test platform". He was wanting to see what the beast would do to somebody else, before he was ever going to fire it. I was captain dumb@$$ for making no inquiries about the ammunition.

    Over the decades, I've fired some "very interesting" reloads cooked-up by some "very interesting" men. I've witnessed bullets shedding their copper jackets mid-air. I've watched the shock-wave of a bullet passing over a canvas tarpaulin suck that tarp up off the ground. I've had a revolver forcing cone split like a can of biscuits (cheap Spanish revolver; probably bad steel and not bad ammo). On and on ... . Watch out everybody!
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  11. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I never felt like a little creep in a trigger was a big issue as long as it was glass smooth. I used to have a British rifle with a really well done double set trigger system. When you set it and moved to the second trigger about all it took was the thought that you wanted to pull the trigger. I got it as part of a deal that included me ordering and selling them one of the first S&W 629s. Basically I got it for about a hundred dollars. I definitely got the best part of that deal because the gun was recalled before he had run a full cylinder through it. S&W had some issues at first with their stainless steel alloy and the heat treatment.
     
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  12. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    Yes, Old Geezer, the range does provide many interesting stories. Some I can describe and some are best kept at the range. Now we all know that ammo is very hard to come by and very expensive, if found. When on Range Master duties, I bring two bench rest for shooters to barrow. On one occasion, a shooter parks his tush (butt) at the 100 yard bench to "Sight In" his AR15 rifle. I offer to let him use one of my bench rests, but he declines and informs me he does not need a shooting bench to sight in. I asked if he already gotten on paper at a shorter distance, he responds , No Not needed. Short story, 100 rounds later, he is still all over the target and not a single bullseye hit. Over estimating your skills can be very expensive. When a shooter accepts sight in help, I can usually get them sighted in with in 3 or four shots, if their rifle can hit paper at 50 yards. Four to 5 shots if I have to start them out at 25 yards.

    I did have a funny situation last Saturday at the range. Shooter could not got on paper, as he could not find the "RED DOT" on his red dot scope. I was asked to check it out. The shooter had asked his "Friend" to mount his red dot. It took me all of 1 minute to determine that his "Friend" had failed to install the battery into the red dot. I gave the shooter a battery (I keep a few spares in my range bag) and showed him how to install it. A few shots later, he was sighted in. Summary: Know your equipment before you get to the range, is could save you both time and money.
     
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  13. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Ok....guns are cleaned and a thin coat of that silicone O ring grease applied to the inside of the barrels and other metal parts.

    Brass is placed into trays to begin the process of reloading in caliber .41 Magnum.

    Will be taking my time in reloading 210 grain copper plated wad cutters and also 250 grain cast lead gas checked flat tipped bullets. About 56 rounds to reload...


    I like the wad cutters and especially the heavy gas check lead bullets for heavy penetration/energy delivery.

    If I can find it I need also to be purchasing a couple more bags of Starline brass in this same calibration and putting it back for future use.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  14. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Wow TexDanm.....yes indeed...double set triggers are nice...if one knows how to use them....very very nice.

    My Dad's rifle is a sporterized Mauser re chambered after the war in Germany to American 30.06 and double set triggers...and you are correct about just thinking it and it fires..

    It is even lighter a trigger than my Hawken Rifle..so one must be very careful and aware in using such an light set trigger...


    Talk about workmanship..even the stock....wonderful checkering...cost my Dad after the war.....20.00 dollars American and two cartons of Luckys.


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  15. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Dalewick..

    I missed this in your post earlier up on this thread.....sorry about that...

    I am not familiar with the .44 magnum nor the .454 Casull....so I cannot really compare.


    I am familiar with my Contender in .35 Remington and it is a genuine mule on both ends...Recoil is very severe..


    I also notice that recoil in .41 magnum is stout in the Blackhawk Revolver ...particularly after doing alot of shooting in that calibration. Not so much in the Contender...as it has a longer barrel....and more weight....very manageable in the Thompson Contender .41 Magnum.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  16. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Just came in from my garage wherein I spent about an hour or so in reloading 56 rounds of .41 Magnum ammunition...I'd shot up last weekend.


    I have loaded 20 rounds of this .41 Magnum ammunition with 250 grain weight wide flat nosed lead cast gas check bullets...at about 1100 feet per second...

    The next batch of some 36 bullets were reloaded with 210 grain copper plated semi wad cutters in .41 magnum to a bit over 1200 feet per second..

    Glad to get these spent cases reloaded and back on the ready line...


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  17. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Olde Geezer...

    Thanks for posting that .41 Magnum reloading video....I verily enjoyed it and have also bookmarked it for future reference.

    Very nice cast gas check bullets he was reloading...very nice...





    Also thanks for the Contender video as well.....nice..!!


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  18. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    It's the 4th, so rat'a'tat'tat ...

    Suppressed MP5

    This guy does a video-game commercial in the middle of this vid, sorry. Skip over that. They are shooting cutting boards so they have the funniest chopping-block skit at the beginning. Then the commercial, then they start the full-auto fun.

    They work their way up from the MP5, to a full auto AK, to a bolt .50 Browning -- with an incendiary round. Guess which wins the butcher-board penetration test!





    upload_2021-7-4_18-49-48.png

    Demo Ranch's Whole Arsenal in One Epic Video... 10 MILLION SUBSCRIBER SPECIAL!!!!

     
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  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Chris, Turret presses are so nice. Once set up you can deprime, reprime, size, flare, drop a powder charge, pop in seat and crimp a bullet all in about 25 to 30 seconds. With help and a little prep work that can be shrunk down quite a bit. My best run with help dropped a finished load about every 12 to 15 seconds. You have to go to a progresive to do much better than that. I have an old Lyman turret press that has loaded thousands and thousands of rounds. I also really liked it when I got carbide sizing dies. I also have a couple of single stage presses that I like for large rifle loading. One is a Lyman orange crush and the other one is a RCBS press.
     
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  20. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    I use a Lee turret press but I have disabled the auto function. I prefer to complete each step on all rounds before moving to the next step. Having all the needed dies setup, does speed the process up and also allow me to focus on each step. 1A) Decap all brass. 1B) Clean all brass, 1C Deburr and champers brass, 2) Measure and trim all brass-to length if needed, 3) Full form / full resize all brass, 4) Prime all brass, 5) Load powder into all cases, 6) Load / seat bullet into all cases, and 7) Crimp the completed loads, if needed. While steps 3 through 7 can be done automatically by the turret press, I am leery of an automated process. I want to be fully focused on each step and on each cartridge, as the process is completed. Being the paranoid that I am, I use electronic scales to confirm the powder dispenser is dumping the correct powder charge and then I use the balance beam scale to verify the electronic scales. I use a micrometer bullet seating die to make sure each and every bullet is seated to the exact same depth. I do my best to eliminate as much variation and human error as possible. It does take me a long time to reload ammo but I have never had a squib load or and over pressured load.
     
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  21. arctic bill

    arctic bill Master Survivalist
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    before the covid i used to have all my civil buddies up to my cabin, I have my own shooting range. it is really a sand pit with 50 yard range with bench rest table anchored in to the ground sand bags ect . Just one shooter at a time. every one would bring what ever they wanted but they had to let everyone else used their guns. the rest would sit in the peanut gallery and comment about accuracy and style . this would go one for most of the day, then back to my place for beers and BBQ. I got to shoot allsorts of flint locks , mauser , some sniper rifles with extra heavy barrel boy are those thing accurate So much fun, I am hoping we can do the same thing this labor day.
     
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  22. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I use an old schoolSpar-T lyman turet press. It doesn't had a self advance and that is fine with me. It is good for rifle loading and has enough rigidity for large rifle rounds. I got it for loading revolver and pistol rounds and used it for loading 223 and such until I picked up a big single stage press. I now have two, one is a Lyman orange crush and the other is made by RCBS.

    I also have my main survival calibers covered with Lee Loaders and the Lee handheld press. A press is just too heavy to haul and hard to set up in the woods. I got into reloading via a survival intrest. I realized quickly that watching TV doesn't prepare you to defend yourself. I wanted to shoot enough that my ability was at least mosty an instinctive action. That required a LOT of shooting. Reloading made it financially possible.

    I started with a Lee handloader and still have it and use it ocassionally. The new ones with carbide rings for resizing are awful nice though. This was in a time period when reloading and most survival related things were big and a lot of people were into it. We used to do a LOT of shooting and it wasn't unusual to go through 500 rounds on a weekend.
     
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  23. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    I have two presses here on my reloading bench in addition to several boxes/calibers of Lee Loaders....handloaders.

    My two presses are a four position Lee Turret Press and also an RCBS Rock Chucker....single stage.

    The turret press for obvious reasons...And I mostly do my sizing on this press...and the seating on the Rock Chucker.

    The Rock Chucker is also for one additional function...


    And that is forming/re forming brass from one calibration to another. This requires a press with very stout construction ...in addition to using lubrication.

    I have broken previous presses in doing such extensive re sizing....re forming brassfrom one caliber to another. Speaking with some Olde Timers...convinced me that the Rock Chucker was they way to go.

    I have thought to myself and for some time now..that in times of ammo shortage...being able to form...re form one parent brass case to another caliber ...is a good thing to know..and will definitely come in handy.



    With the advent of the Obama administration ammo shortages came sooner than I had expected...and with the Biden Administration we are now under Obama II concerning ammo availability.


    Am expecting the same or similar to happen to the gasoline powered car...

    By Enlightenment, by Reason, By Logic, By Illumination....you understand????!!

    Obama III again..buckle up!! Trays in the upright and stowed position.

    Ishmaelites run wild..


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2021
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  24. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    Chris, thank you for the post. I had completely forgotten about the need / ability to re-size a case for one cartridge size int0 a completely different caliber. I would certainly not want to use my Lee Turret press for that operation. I will have to keep my eye's open for a sale on the "Rock Chucker". A solid single stage press is most certainly required for the "Re-Calibration" sizing process. Thanks again for the reminder.
     
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  25. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    The .243 is a necked-down .308. Same with the 7mm-08. Whole bunch of cartridges started out as another chambering -- way too many for me to recall. And then there are the wildcat cartridges -- lord knows how many of them have been created!

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=necked-down+cartridges+&atb=v140-1&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images

    I want that .17/50! You only need a 17 foot long barrel to burn the powder.

    upload_2021-7-6_22-46-25.png
     
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  26. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard ! Staff Member
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    Can anyone recommend a book that list the starting case (parent case / caliber) and all the calibers it can be re-sized to. Example: Old Geezer --- 243 is a necked down 308. The 308 would be the "Parent Case: and the 243 would be listed as a "RE-Sized" case. I would like to get a book /manual that would allow me to learn what brass cases I should / could start saving for future re-sizing / reloading projects.
     
  27. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Yes...indeed. I took time and monies to get certain reference materials.

    My Hornady reloading manual will often state..for example...that the .243 came from necking down the .308.

    Now a further detailed book for cartridges...even ones of which I've never heard their names...is...

    "The Handloaders Manual of Cartridge Conversions."[b/]

    by

    Donnely and Donnely.

    Amazon.com: The Handloader's Manual of Cartridge Conversions (9781616082383): Donnelly, John J., Donnelly, Judy: Books

    I consider the time and monies for both a regular reloading manual and this book on cartridge conversions to be valuable reference materials.

    I did not realize until reading this book on cartridge conversions...that in the olde days there were that many types of .38 caliber rounds with different cases for them.
    Today we mostly think of the .38 Special and then the .357 Magnum....but there were a whole host of other brass cases in .38 caliber in the olde days.


    Hope this helps TMT Tactical.

    I was not quite prepared for this ammo shortage in thinking it would not happen so soon....

    But ...now I do have some reference materials here...for when and if needed.


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    1. TMT Tactical
      Thank you Chris for the info and the link. It is ordered and will be here this Friday. Since I spend at least one full day at the range each week. I have access to a lot of brass. Until now, I have just been collecting the brass for calibers I own and use. Now I will scope out what brass can be converted (RE-SIZED) into calibers I own or plan to own in the future. Then of course the hunt for dies and a discounted ( on sale) super solid single stage press. I also ordered the Lyman Reloading Manual. I already had the Hornady and the Lee Reloading Manuals. The more info, the better. Thanks again for your help.
       
      TMT Tactical, Jul 7, 2021
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  28. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Case forming link:

    http://www.castpics.net/subsite/Conversions/Case Reforming.pdf

    This link has the Donnely book recommendation that Chris provided plus another book recommendation.

    upload_2021-7-7_12-52-8.png

    Amazon's Nonte's book:

    https://www.amazon.com/Guide-Cartridge-Conversions-George-Nonte/dp/B001LP3AZA

    The above link proved another link that provides extensive tables concerning which case can be created by using another -- usually more available -- cartridge case. I mean I hit the link and got a HUGE table of information I never EVEN knew about. Just went back, I'm not lying, the table has over 1,400 rows!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Holy crap. Even has shotshells. Link provides pdf file with this massive table. The table provides dimension specifications on reforming each case.

    http://www.castpics.net/subsite/Conversions/default.html


    upload_2021-7-7_13-7-49.png
     
    1. TMT Tactical
      Holy Cow Batman!!! OG. Thanks for the link. I have downloaded the Excel file and I am completely blown away with the number of cartridge conversions. Heck. I did not know that many calibers even existed, much less how to convert them. Thanks again.
       
      TMT Tactical, Jul 7, 2021
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  29. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    You are certainly welcome TMT Tactical and glad to be of service in your endeavor.

    I consider such skill/knowledge in a pinch....as useful as learning to pick locks. Capable of getting one out of a tight and or expensive situation. Yes..indeed a survival skill. That is what we are about....survival.

    Also Olde Geezer..I have never heard of that other fellow...George Nonte and have bookmarked the link you have provided.
    Thanks for the link.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
  30. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Was moseying through a antique shop with teenage grandson in tow. He'd once said he found the Shofield revolver fascinating. Me too. There are things I do not like about the Shofield, but I've always fancied top break revolvers for some reason.

    So we are looking through the cases of antiques and one cabinet has old boxes of ammunition. What was in there but an old box of Remington .44 Russian. Holy smoke, some ammo for an old Shofield! I didn't know that a .45 S&W Shofield cartridge existed until I read the below article. I knew that Russia wanted some of these revolvers, but that was all I knew.

    The following article speaks to the usefulness of these old cartridge cases:

    https://www.shootingtimes.com/editorial/44-russian-45-schofield-case-capacity/367574

    Article's conclusion:

    "One thing is clear: Where too little pressure can cause as much trouble as too much pressure, the two short cases offer a compelling benefit. The .44 Russian and the .45 Schofield let you create light loads that match the modest velocities of .44 Special and .45 Colt start loads but with safe higher pressures that you know will get the bullet through the bore and downrange reliably."

    One is always learning.

    [​IMG]
     
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  31. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Neat idea. How about this Aero Survival Rifle in .357 Sig! How cute! How deadly! With over 800 ft. lbs. of energy, this puppy could be a great defensive rifle, plus it could put food on the table. Eastern white-tailed deer are not exactly "big game" in my mind. People kill them with handguns all the time. Here's another thing, I've been in gun stores and the ammo shelves were barren ... except that "odd" calibers such as the .357 Sig were still stocked with stacks of ammo. The bottle-necked .357 Sig feeds and fires -- it just does. Bottle-neck handgun rounds do not jam like straight cases do.

    http://www.survivalrifle.com/

    Put a scope on it with "see-thru" mounts so that you could use the scope OR the iron sights.

    upload_2021-7-9_0-20-23.png


    [​IMG]

    upload_2021-7-9_0-21-56.png

    upload_2021-7-9_0-22-52.png
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  32. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    picked up brass today.


    Made a special trip to the gun club to pay my annual dues...and while there discovered a cart on which the club had bagged up various brass for sale.

    Hence while there I bought a bag of .45ACP ..brass...500 count...

    And also I picked up a bag of 300 count brass in 7.62 x 39 mm cases. This brass is boxer primed....single primer hole....and not berdan primed...double primer holes.

    I have both dies and bullets to reload both calibrations....so will be slowly and so doing over time. No rush.

    I particularly wanted the 7.62 x 39 mm brass as most of what you see is steel cased and berdan primed.


    Lots of 9mm and .40 S&W brass on the cart but I dont have a 9mm tool...and plenty of .40 S&W. Some .223 brass on the cart as well and may go back some time and pick that up as well.


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
    Old Geezer and TMT Tactical like this.
    1. TMT Tactical
      That is one of my perks for volunteering at my local club. All the brass I wish to haul home, for free. I have a few thousand brass cases in 223, 556, 7.62 x 39. I stopped collecting 9mm as I have too much to keep storing them. I am now collecting brass for calibers I don't have but may get in the distant future. Once the powder and primers become readily available, I will be set.
       
      TMT Tactical, Jul 19, 2021
      watcherchris and Old Geezer like this.
  33. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    You know TMT Tactical...I don't particularly like the 9mm Parabellum calibration....or what some call the 9 x 19 caliber.

    However...of recent I learned that Taurus makes a pistol I like in .38 Special/.357 caliber with a separate 9 x 19mm cylinder.

    This model here..

    TaurusĀ® 692 357 Mag / 38 Spl +P / 9mm Luger Matte Black 6.50 in. Ribber GripĀ® (taurususa.com)


    I currently have a GP 100 in .38 Special/.357 Mag... but am considering that Taurus with a 9mm cylinder as no doubt 9mm Parabellum is about everywhere out here....

    Hard to argue with versatility though I have never been fond of the 9mm Parabellum.


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
    1. TMT Tactical
      In the past I liked the 9mm for it's low cost and availability. It is not a "MAN" stopper like the 357 but it was cheap (past tense) to shoot, so it made a nice range caliber and in a pinch, with enough well placed shots, it could be an adequate home /self defense caliber. With the rising cost and difficulty getting this caliber, I would now lean towards the 40 S&W, the 10 mm or the 357 mag. These calibers are not cheap but can be found easier (on store shelves) and they are certainly adequate "MAN" stoppers.
       
      TMT Tactical, Jul 20, 2021
  34. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    In a snub-nosed revolver, the 9mm outperforms the .38 special, even the .38 special +P.

    Commercial loadings of the 9mm, allow the bullet to get up to speed without much barrel length -- rapid-burning powders.
    .
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
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