On Bahamas' Situation/recovery

Discussion in 'News, Current Events, and Politics' started by Pragmatist, Sep 7, 2019.

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  1. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/06/hurricanes-bahamas-dorian-existential-threat

    Good morning all,

    Ref article's title; Build some non-hurricane hardened residential dwellings on land subject to devastation and watch the word "existential" get overused. A parallel title could be "100 persons died in metro Los Angeles within 24 hours". True, correct, useless info. It's a matter of routine - just like hurricanes.

    Note term "economic contributors".

    Re: "What else can we do but remain resilient and continue to build stronger." : Relocate !

    Ref: "...in need of global support"; Doesn't Cuba have an immigration program ? Also volunteer for their annual sugar cane harvest. Free lunch provided: sugar sweetened water.

    If someone in the Bahamas flees to attic space and "uncertain" ... while up there, read (NO CANDLES !) "Life on the Mississippi".
     
  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    If you are a snake handler, you are going to get bit and nobody will feel sorry for you. Build a tin shack house in hurricane ally and you should expect to be on your own. SIASD.
     
  3. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Nobody anywhere is prepared for a storm that is basically an enormous tornado with 185MPH winds and gusts over 250mph that just SITS on you for hours and hours and HOURS!!! It wouldn't matter if you were in a brick home. You would be lucky if the slab was still there when it was done with you.

    When you live on an island that has very few natural resources to sell and you are almost totally dependent on outside investors to build your vacation getaway industry the people that live there are not going to have the money to import the materials to build big substantial homes. They build with what they have.

    This was a storm of unparalleled power that just stopped moving on one little island down there. We help everyone else, even especially those that don't deserve it and hate us so I have no problem with helping them.

    Americans massively overbuild and live in homes that are mostly unused space. When I was a kid home were 1000 to 1500 sq feet and this was for families that averaged 3 or more kids. nowadays homes run 1800 sq feet and up for smaller families. In the event of an apocalypse, it is going to be hard on most survivors to adapt to the fact that very small cabins are all that you can probably build and heat. You also will cook outside or in a detached kitchen area so in case of fire you don't lose everything. All you need is someplace that is dry and big enough for you and the supplies you need to keep inside and can keep you warm. Smaller is better and if you live in a hot climate you basically only need a roof and maybe a short walls for defense.
     
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  4. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    You roll the dice and then pay the piper. So everybody is FORCED to stay on his island? They have no choice and no way off the island. I will not be sending any money. This was not a in a life time event, it was just a nastier event. If the rich want their resort island back, then let them pay to build it back. Sheeple will always get slaughtered. If you can't afford to be protected from the weather, move away from the weather.
     
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  5. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    They were BORN there. It wasn't a matter of choice. If you are poor you can't just get up and move. That sort of idea is what we are building a wall in the US to STOP. If you live in the north and a storm knocks out your power and your roads are blocked would you feel like you should be allowed to freeze to death? You CHOSE to live someplace that gets bad cold in the winter. You do understand that when you live on a little island in the ocean that you can't just move to another place. Even if you have a boat who wants you. I guess you want the US to just take them in and put them on welfare. It will be cheaper to help them than take them on and support them here. Sheeple are people that CHOOSE to allow themselves to be in a bad situation, NOT people that have bad things happen to them over which they have no control. Sometimes in life, you just have to make the best that you can out of a bad situation.
     
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  6. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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  7. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    And we have had so many debate that when it happens here it won't be that bad. RIGHT!!! How long did it take for the looting an killings to start --- 2 -3 days at most.

    Now as for should we let them in here---NO and Hell NO. We have still got all the Haitians we let in 20 or 30 years ago. One in, they never leave. If we do have to let anybody in, it should be those from the island, with NO criminal history. That is as far as my generosity goes --- and no welfare --- work fare. They would not get free care back on the island why should we provide it here?
     
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  8. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Had the opportunity to speak with a Puerto Rico lady this past week. Asked her about hurricane Maria and the inability to distribute food. I'd read that supplies were stuck in ports. She said a way-high-up official had actually pilfered the lot and was selling to those who were political/mob allies only. I'd also read about truckers unions refusing to deliver supplies unless paid more money. There were perpetual armed robberies from the gangs (every society has gangs), true. Seems however that the big reason that supplies didn't get out to the needing people was the actions of this corrupt Puerto Rican official.

    The lady told me a whole lot more about this official. He inevitably made an international celebrity who was a native of this territory really angry and this individual returned and worked against the politician until he got booted out of office.

    I asked her about unarmed citizens of Puerto Rico not being able to keep their generators, the armed gangs simply came and took the generators to use or to sell at highly inflated prices. She said that sure that was true, however that stuff was petty. She said the armed gangs stole two huge generators from a mobile power station sent in to supply what electricity they could.

    When things go sideways, "you don't own it unless you can protect it."
     
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  9. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    When things go sideways, "you don't own it unless you can protect it."

    Truer words never spoken Old Geezer.
     
  10. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning TexDanm,

    You're not using the actual equation.

    All those on Abaco Island are not poor and ALL could ask about arrangements to relocate to a safer environment. This is most important for those under daily medical care and those with young children.

    There is wealth provided by, for example, the US Government via USCG helicopters, Customs and Border Patrol, based in both Freeport and US locations eg Palm Beach, Fla.

    The current evacuations from Abaco Island to Palm Beach are cheaper - in large budget, multi-year planning - that a poor person on any of the Bahamian islands getting infected with a contagious disease and serving as a vector to post disaster tourists from US, Canada, elsewhere.


    It's one thing to be poor living in the Camden - Trenton corridor. It's no comparison to the Bahamas.

    ...

    The only weak point about the Bahamas I must mention is that Adam Clayton Powell had his cremated remains flung into the wind at Bimini Island, Bahamas.
     
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  11. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/08/us/bahamas-dorian-homeless-relief/index.html

    Good afternoon all,

    More on the Bahamian recovery.

    I'm posting this link not for the human interest story ... we know of this large tragic event.

    For our research; ...

    Note the paragraph "There are ... and gasoline in the water".

    Think if you were at a similar type of environment - warm weather island or other topo feature, the typical socio-economic classes present, a better quality of government services than typically experienced, English spoken, ...

    Then, a notice - event like a hurricane ... there was notice or even worse, a no-notice event such as earth quakes offshore Oregon that could cause public health dangers, ...

    What would your belt on your calypso pants be ? a nice white cotton mesh with colorful signal flag pictures and a pouch with cell phone ? or something a bit more elaborate ?

    Walking around in flip-flops ? a short sleeve shirt, no hat ? no tote bag or flight bag ? Just about no one carries their med records in a waterproof pouch to Ocean City, Maryland ...

    I'm just trying to provoke thought.

    ...

    Per article; the authorities were present throughout the small archipelago nation. What was present was the survivors' perception of their absence. It's important at a disaster scene for uniforms to be seen, .... vests, helmets, the symbols of help is arriving.

    Note "Their own social networks" Important !

    ...

    If titles and job positions mentioned in a report or an article, I place value on statements within realm of person's subject-matter field, such as public health and not on external matters of specialty unless a prominent personality with an array of experiences in background. They probably won't be from Harvard.

    ...

    Returning to "For our research":
    Think, plan, prep

    And factor in safety !
     
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  12. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Good afternoon Pragmatist

    I guess it is relative to what is considered poor and what is wealth. You said that the people on Abaco Island are not poor. My response was to TMT Tacticals post where he said "Build a tin shack house in hurricane ally and you should expect to be on your own. SIASD." Where I live people that build and live in tin shacks are not considered wealthy. I guess if you live in a grass hut maybe a tin shack might be sort of upscale but for most people, I don't think that it is the lap of luxury and an indication of you having a bunch of loose cash on hand.

    All of that aside though, even if you are rich and live in a tin mansion when you are hit by a natural disaster over which you have no control I will help you out if I can. People in New Orleans choose to live in 12 to 15 foot deep holes in the ground in flood zones. We helped them. People all up and down the California coast have chosen to build on top of a huge fault that is GOING to eventually shake them up and kill a bunch of them as it has done repeatedly in the past. We helped them and will in the future.

    I was raised on the Gulf Coast. We KNEW that eventually, a storm would hit us. when it did we got a little help. Why were we there? Well, do you like having gas for your car and home heating fuel? Where I lived refined 60% of the gas and fuel used by this country and our oil wells were heavy producers for decades. If we abandoned those fields and refineries it wouldn't be good.

    People live all over the world in places that if they had any sense they would abandon. Honestly to me if you live in any of the major metropolitan megalopolises you are living in a place that is not a safe or secure place to be. I can't imagine living in Chicago but I have family there. People in LA have a cost of living that makes someone with a $50,000.00 income and a family of 4 almost homeless.

    To some extent, I think that when people lose the ability to care about the suffering of other people they are in trouble. That doesn't mean that you have o take them on to support but when you have as much as we have here I think that we can afford to help others. We throw away more than many countries have. This is in part due to our hard work and in part that we are blessed with a country that is filled to overflowing with natural resources. I don't have much use for beggers but I do occasionally pay the bill for someone that is struggling. I like it best to do anonomusly. I have been blessed. I don't owe it to people to help them but I also do owe to those that have helped me in my past and do feel an obligation to pass that help on...
     
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  13. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good evening TexDanm,

    The web will never replace an in-person meeting room.

    My theme is that people not in the best of shape - physically, mentally, financially - who cannot properly handle disasters are placing about 12 responders in lethal danger when rescues are attempted during and after disasters.

    I am on more than 1 domestic emergency responder squad and more than 1 international responder team. I've seen much of the current mess - to include the presence of contractors and their additional agendas.

    Actually, I said : - not all - on Abaco Island were poor. I've seen the poor of the world and they won't have children nor relatives in Florida or elsewhere. All this still does not matter.

    Helping as a casual volunteer is noble in a sense but it's also camouflage to the major policy issue of getting mobile-enough people out of dangerous zones.

    Give a man a fish and he was given a meal. Give him instruction and guidance on how to fish and it's a career. It's the same analogy for those dwelling in Hurricane Alley and the Louisiana Coast.
     
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  14. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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  15. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    https://www.npr.org/2019/09/05/7578...enerational-devastation-from-hurricane-dorian


    Good morning all,

    Yes, I know it's NPR.......
    but the pictures are good and article has some key points for us to address.

    You are an experienced and skilled prepper - and leg gets broken. Is your on-person kit, your equipment rig configured to allow for handling the emergency injury ? You're alone.

    The church used for sheltering had a wall collapse. What natural event requires incident victims/survivors to be outside as the best practice for safety ?

    Disregard losses mentioning business interruption exposures.

    For both here and there, I've got maps and charts with inactive seaplane bases. Both weather and costs determine value of seaplane use.
     
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