Overpacking

Discussion in 'Wilderness' started by EarlyMarksman, Sep 12, 2019 at 4:53 AM.

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  1. EarlyMarksman

    EarlyMarksman Well-Known Member
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    A lot of you experienced bushcrafters/preppers will find this information to be rather basic, but this is for the newer guys such as myself.

    I've made the mistake of carrying unnecessary items in my pack that added dead weight. I remember once on a four mile hike I carried a crowbar. Now what am I going to do with a crowbar in the woods, especially on a hike? Sure, one can say I could dig with it (albeit that would be agitating to attempt) but I would've been better off to use the things around me and make my own shovel out of a thick enough branch.
    Secondly, I also had five boxes of shotgun shells when I wasn't even carrying a shotgun with me. It was there just putting on needless weight.
    I also had two MRE's (Keep in mind that this is merely a get home bag and not a full on BoB. A majority of the time I'm no farther than 25 miles from my home therefore carrying an excess amount of food isn't needed. One MRE would suffice.) which added more unnecessary weight considering my dad had packed a bag with nutrition that he carried.

    So after that I began looking to real sources of camping/bushcrafting like Dave Canterbury and his idea of the Five C's of Survivability:
    -Cutting tools
    -Combustion devices
    -Cordages
    -Cover elements
    -Containers

    Canterbury was saying in his book Bushcraft 101 that those are the top items needed for a successful night in the bush. So now I am working on modifying my pack and am also looking into the Ten C's as well.
     
  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    my GHB is a small waist bag, I think Americans call it a fanny pack or something, that contains most of what I need to get home in an emergency.
     
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  3. EarlyMarksman

    EarlyMarksman Well-Known Member
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    Believe it or not, that is exactly what I was wanting to try myself. I have a small pack that is a little larger than a fannypack that I would love to make into a GHB. Could you give me some ideas of things that would be good to put in it?
     
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  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    think what you would need to get back home in an emergency, everyone has different ideas, but you will need food and water, maybe a personal water filter as you wont be able to carry water for the whole journey, maybe a paper map and a compass and know how to use them, something to start a fire, you could have one of the modern fire starters that are sold on Ebay, I wouldn't bother with matches as they get damp but a disposable lighter or two is okay, some paracord and maybe a small tarp. I carry one of the emergency shelters that folds up small also an emergency survival sleeping bag -again one of the (orange or green) ones that are sold on Ebay. you will probably never use any of this stuff but carry it anyway "just in case", mine lives in the back of my vehicle on a permanent basis.
     
  5. EarlyMarksman

    EarlyMarksman Well-Known Member
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    Appreciate the feedback!
     
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  6. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    EarlyMarksman: You can get the five C's into a fanny pack pretty simply. That is a principal I also follow. All of my bags will have the 5 C's. In a GHB you really don't need much. Would your trek home be urban, suburban, or rural? Are there water sources along the way? A Sawyer mini or some small filter would a good. I keep a sillcock key in mine, but I am in a suburban environment, and most of the time would have a very short walk. You probably wouldn't need much food; a couple of Cliff bars or energy bars would suffice. A good fire kit will fit in an Altoids tin or even a small prescription bottle. A 55 gallon heavy duty trash can liner or two can serve as shelter. Another item that is often overlooked is cash. If the power is down, and the ATM's don't work cash will be king. Maybe you have to get gas. No credit cards. Keep small bills; nobody is going to give you change.

    Hope this helps.
     
  7. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Early Marksman,

    SIDEBAR: A return "Howdy" ref your initiated conversation post just saw nearby. Was ultra busy this AM.

    Be very careful with the philosophy regarding distance and safety. Twenty five miles or 2.5 miles or 250 miles takes on new meaning when the variables come into play. A couple of years ago, a weather emergency had all the cars on the Atlanta, Georgia beltway parked "for ages". The testimonials from the stranded motorists told of "If only...".
     
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  8. EarlyMarksman

    EarlyMarksman Well-Known Member
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    For sure I appreciate you taking the time to assist and even giving me an idea or two.
     
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  9. EarlyMarksman

    EarlyMarksman Well-Known Member
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    Yeah I see. 25 miles is a pretty long way for sure.
     
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  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    not as far as you may think, two days walk for most people.
     
  11. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    Ride a bike. Just a couple of hours.
     
  12. EarlyMarksman

    EarlyMarksman Well-Known Member
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    I personally do not own a bike. Some people predict that vehicles won't work while some predict that only 5% of vehicles will become useless after an EMP attack. I'm preparing to be able to use my vehicle but in the case I have to ditch it or it doesn't function anymore I need something small to sustain me on the walk home.
     
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  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    if there is an EMP the pumps in the filling stations wont work so no fuel is available, make sure you do the prepper trick of ALWAYS filling up your tank when it gets down to half, I've been doing this for the last 40 years, you don't want to run out of fuel in an emergency.
    the sheeple over here drive on empty and only fill up when the fuel warning light comes on.
     
  14. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    I keep a hand pump siphon for when/if the pumps stop. I will siphon from the inground tanks or gas tanks as needed. I just traded my camper van for an 81 Ford E250. No computer. I changed my distributor for one with points and a condenser. I plan to get a couple of spare condensers just in case.
     
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  15. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    having fuel is not on my list of priorities post event, I doubt i'll be going anywhere.
    i'll have a full tank and that will suffice.
     
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  16. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Son of Liberty,

    Fond memories returned ! I knew how to - and had the required gadgets - to work the ignition timing and dwell.

    Now, even current knowledge without having the computer stuff and the manuals/tech sheers for most of use ... there went the shade tree mechanic. Times change I know.

    That E-250: real good choice.
     
  17. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    Yeah, using a timing light came back easy enough, and luckily my old fluke has a dwell setting. So, good to go.
     
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  18. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
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    Anti-siphon devices will prevent this from happening to inground or vehicle gas tanks. Even law enforcement and rescue operations could not get the fuel out of tanks during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. That is why some resorted to commandeering private vehicles for fuel.


    .
     
  19. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
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    Then they didn't know that there are no anti-siphon devices underneath the shear plate inside the body of the pump. That makes my life a little easier. There are also ways to defeat the anti-siphon device in modern automobiles. How do you think we mechanics empty gas tanks when we need to change out fuel pumps?
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2019 at 7:33 AM

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