Pests

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by Kootenay prepper, Aug 4, 2018.

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  1. Kootenay prepper

    Kootenay prepper Expert Member
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    Every year usually make close to 100 jars of raspberry jam. This year the gooseberry bush was infested for the first time by red currant fruit flies also known in there earlier stage gooseberry maggots. We ended up losing the whole gooseberry bush and it also wiped out the entire raspberry patch, going to have to double down on the wild huckleberry jam.
    Wondering if anyone else has dealt with this problem before and what they have done. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    Sorry but the black on dark grey doesn't work very well. I gave up on it even though it's an interesting post.
     
  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    cant read it, what happened to the normal white script?
     
  4. Kootenay prepper

    Kootenay prepper Expert Member
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    Every year usually make close to 100 jars of raspberry jam. This year the gooseberry bush was infested for the first time by red currant fruit flies also known in there earlier stage gooseberry maggots. We ended up losing the whole gooseberry bush and it also wiped out the entire raspberry patch, going to have to double down on the wild huckleberry jam.
    Wondering if anyone else has dealt with this problem before and what they have done. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.
     
  5. Kootenay prepper

    Kootenay prepper Expert Member
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    Sorry about that didn’t notice it changed to black
     
  6. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    No problem Kootenay, in answer to your post I have never experienced that particular problem but have suffered wasp damage to soft fruit in the past. I put out some serious wasp traps (they also trap flies) around this time of year in an effort to wipe them out. If there are too many survivors by the time the soft fruit is gone they will turn on my bee hives and I can't have that.
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    our main problem here is slugs.
     
  8. Kootenay prepper

    Kootenay prepper Expert Member
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    Used to get the slugs bad, broke up egg shells around the garden every year and haven’t had them in the garden again.
     
  9. watcherchris

    watcherchris Expert Member
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    I never heard that one ...slugs do not like egg shells??? That's a new one to me...but thanks.

    Watcherchris.
     
  10. Kootenay prepper

    Kootenay prepper Expert Member
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    The slugs cut the bottom of them open on the egg shells and will avoid that area and then every year turn the soil over and the old egg shells just help fertilize the soil over the winter.
     
  11. Bluesky9

    Bluesky9 Member
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    My main problem with gooseberries (and my 15 orchard trees) has been fungus, bacterial or virus in addition to the insects. Mid summer, Japanese beetles ate 90 percent of the leaves while I was on vacation. Since then, he new leaves have many spots from the infections. In late July, I sprayed with "fruit tree spray" (a mix of insecticide and fungicide) and now the leaves look fairly good. Bottom line- I am going to spray more often.
     
  12. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    Do you prune them to open them up to allow greater air circulation through them? I find it helps a little. Some varieties of tree are much more susceptible to mold and insect attack, I know you have to have much more mold resistant rootstock in the US than we need in the UK..some of your fungal infections are really bad.
     
  13. Bluesky9

    Bluesky9 Member
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    I have not done much pruning yet. We just bought this home (25 acres) 2 years ago, so the Dwarf trees are barely 8 feet tall. This winter, I will prune some and I do like the "vase" method to keep the tree shorter. Since I'm 75, I do not want to be crawling around in these trees.
    Usually I spray when I see a problem. But the University of Missouri Extension says to spray much oftener - like every two weeks. And now there is a bacterial (bt) spray for the Japanese beetle that I will try.
     

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