Pistol vs revolver

Discussion in 'Gun Comparisons' started by Arboreal, Jun 3, 2016.

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  1. Arboreal

    Arboreal Active Member
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    I've been told once by a "gun fanatic" friend that revolvers are better, because they're supposedly more reliable. However, I've read that modern semi-autos are actually no worse than revolvers, and that pistols are so advanced that "wheel guns" are basically obsolete by now. What the local experts think about this?
    (I'm asking out of curiosity, since due to local gun laws and my currently limited budget I'm not going to buy a handgun anytime soon...).
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  2. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    Each has its pros and cons!
    Centrefire revolvers you get six shots, there are no safties no rack to slide etc . Very basic very easy ideal for someone who may carry it for years and not really use it.
    It is there ready but you only got six shots before a long slow reload!

    Centrefire pistols can have upwards of 17 shots before a reload but there are safties, slides and magazines! more training involved to use properly!

    Both will bugger up if you don't look after them both can jam and both can fire the next round if the last is stuck in the barrel wrecking the gun!

    Either will serve well if fed decent ammo and maintained properly!

    One difference is if you limpwrist an auto with mild ammo they will play up! not so a revolver!

    Guns should have names and get cared for.
     
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  3. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    If I was going to use a modern gun for wilderness survival, which I am not, I would choose the revolver over the semi-auto pistol. In my work & everyday living I have used both. I love the 9mm Glock, I can chew the bull's eye out with one of these, but would only ever use one in the city.
    I have used many revolvers, from a little .36 caliber up to .45 & everything in between & favour them for hard work. I don't like snub nosed revolvers, maybe it is just me, but I could not hit a barn door with one of these. Close up, fine, but not for any distance. I think my favourite calibers would be the .357 magnum & the .45. Ruger are good, & so are Smith & Wesson. But there may be other brands just as good that I have not used to date.
    For long term wilderness living, I choose the flintlock smoothbore pistol, absolutely love the one I have. The grip & feel surpasses any other hand gun I have ever used.
    Keith.
    [​IMG]
    My .70 caliber smoothbore flintlock pistol. 300 years old & still going well :) I wonder if anyone will be able to say that about a semi-auto in 300 years time?!
    Keith.
     
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  4. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Pistols were made for protection easy to carry easy to hide single shot pistols were first like the one keith has in his photo then new and improved multi barlled pistol came along then with the carteridge was made the revolver was developed now the semi auto. And even full auto are made1 any and all are deadly any small firearm is uselly called a pistol your choice buy in a cal you can shoot comfy with learn how to use it and dont worry what others thinkbut please dont confuse people a pistol is a hand held short compact firearm most dont have a shoulder rest stock a revolver is a type of pistol where the shell turn in a. Multi chambered round cylnder to reload after each shot its just a type of firearm i myself prefer a revolver over other types easy to load easy to reload easy to clean and care for where keiths is ok it needs tore down and scrubbed for cleaning as do semi and full auto ones do allsomy choice is a 357mag revolver paired withh a 357mag lever daction rifle
     
  5. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    My favourite revolver was a colt King Cobra .357m 6in barrel in stainless!
    shorter trigger reach than the Python!
    My favourite semi-auto was a Beretta 92 blue in 9mm!
    My favourite target gun was a Beretta 76

    I no longer compete so sold them off! and binned the trophies.
     
  6. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Not scrubbed, & very easy & simple to clean, just "lock, stock & barrel" :) Far less to go wrong with my flintlock pistol than there is with a revolver or semi-auto. That is why I chose it.
    Keith.
     
  7. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    To clean any black powdee rifle or pistol right because of how dirty black powder is after a period of shooting they need tore down.and cleaned with hot soapie water not doing this leaves dirt aand debrie in the gun the causes damage to it and after a period of time makes weapon unsafe to fire a unclean gun any gun is askin for problems nothing agaist a black powder firearm in their time they were great weapons now with all the modern choices they are not the best choice for a modern person to choose im sorry Keith your guns are yours fine but without proper care and maintance a firearm becomes a club if your shootin them in shows on a reguler basees and not cleaning them right your headed for trouble black powder guns are fine weapons but the loading of the shooting of and care of them make them a very poor choice in this modern world to bet your life on
     
  8. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Tom, I am an old man now & have been using muzzle-loading guns for many many years. Yes black powder is corrosive, but NO you do not have to scrub a muzzle-loader within an inch of its life with soapy water. I would prefer it if you educated yourself on the use & maintenance of muzzle-loading guns & stop spreading misinformation. Your posts are becoming rather tiresome Tom! Post on items you have some experience with & good knowledge of & leave the rest to people who know what they are talking about please!

    May I respectfully suggest you go to the "All Things Primitive" section & educate yourself.
    Keith.
     
  9. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Again keith im sorry but yes you do clean and scrub a muzzleloader im very well informed on them as i owe 3 myselt 32cal and two 50 cals i do mountainman compatitions with. My old gear setups and do well at it i love my muzzleloaders they are fine rifles for what they are a blast from the past
     
  10. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    You said Tom, & I quote "To clean any black powdee rifle or pistol right because of how dirty black powder is after a period of shooting they need tore down.and cleaned with hot soapie water". This is NOT correct, & just because you do it, it does not make it right.

    In a wilderness situation you will not have soap to clean your muzzle-loader Tom. Using hot water alone is quite sufficient, in fact using cold water is sufficient, providing you warm the barrel next to a fire to dry it out. The same goes for the lock. Oil penetrates the metal in a gun barrel, using soap & hot water can remove this oil, & that is not desirable in a wilderness situation or anywhere else. I have no more to say on this matter.
    Keith.
     
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  11. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    You and yours fine i will have soap.with me. Now you and your smooth bores can do your thing thats fine wish you luck and hope it works out for you i have mine yes but when things go badim grabbing a modern firearm as you shoot your three shots two with your 20g one with your 70? And you fumble to reload someone with a modern rifle will have many rounds ready to go after you do relod they will take you out because they know where you are and waited till your done and move to ready to fire cock and aim im sorry you will be toast. The guns your useing the big cloud of smoke made when fired give you away your located as your getting powder in the ball set the ball rammed set the pan filled they have moved and just waiting for you if they wait most will spray you with burst and move onto you quickly think on it keith your guns were fine in their day but get something thats going to give you a better chance
     
  12. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    A malfunctioning modern firearm Tom is just a goat stake & a club. A modern firearm when it runs out of ammunition is no better. You attitude towards my posts & to muzzle-loaders in general are pathetic Tom. You don't think my choice is a good one, fine, leave it at that. Below is some period info on cleaning, I suppose you know better than these experts, or you will say this method is outdated for a modern muzzle-loading gun. It worked then Tom & it has been working for over 300 years, & yet you claim to know better?!!!
    Keith.

    "The Care and Cleaning of Firelocks in the 18th Century: A Discussion of Period Methods and Their Present Day Applications."

    George Edie, A Treatise on English Shooting (London 1772) (7-8) "When a person is master of a good Piece, the keeping it in proper order is a main article in the doing execution with it: it is necessary the inside of the barrel, the touch-hole, and the lock, be kept clean; and the springs and moving parts of the lock properly oiled. The barrel should be washed at least after every eighteen or twenty fires, where the best sort of powder is used; but if the gun-powder is an inferior sort, then the barrel will require oftener washing. The best method of washing a barrel is, by taking out the britchpin; but as this can seldom be conveniently done, take the barrel out of the stock, and put the britch- end in to a pail of warm water, leaving the touch-hole open; then, with an iron rod, with tow or a bit of linen rag at the end, draw up and down in the syringe manner, till it is quite clean; changing the water, and rinsing the inside, as the foulness requires: when this is done, it will be proper to put in a red-hot iron, of six or eight inches in length (which any blacksmith will furnish), and move it up and down to dry any remaining damp: the outside of the barrel should be well dried, and a little oil rubbed over every time of cleaning." ________________

    Thomas Simes, The Regulator: or Instructions to Form the Officer and Complete the Soldier (London, 1780) “How to clean the Barrel. After every firing day the barrel is to be washed, by taking it out of the stock, and putting the breeching into water, leaving the touch hole open: then with an iron ram-rod and worm, with a piece of tow or rag, draw up and down the barrel till it becomes quite clean; when dry, rub it out with another piece of dry rag, and the outside of the barrel with buff leather. The lock not to be taken to pieces but when necessity requires it – and that is, when the trigger or hammer goes stiff, or sounds unpleasant to the ear.”

    https://www.scribd.com/doc/29298585...od-Methods-and-Their-Present-Day-Applications
     
  13. CivilDefense

    CivilDefense Expert Member
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    It is not an either/or for us. Most of our defensive handguns are automatics. However, we do have several revolvers too. The primary "working" sidearm I carry whilst on our acreage is a large-frame, 6", 6-shot, .357 Magnum. However, for CHL carry, we (my wife and I) generally pack autos, with a 5-shot snubbie at times. Like any other tool, picking the right one for the job requires some variety.
     
  14. Aloysus

    Aloysus New Member
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    Pistols were supposed to completely replace revolvers, but they haven't. Pistols may fire more accurately when you really work them, but the rhythm of revolvers just feels better to me. A .44 magnum delivers high power and doesn't break your hand off - it is not even the most powerful revolver out there. A pistol does not handle power so well. A .50 compact Desert Eagle feel like it is tearing your hand off and after two shots in quick succession you won't be able to hit the target nine times out of ten. Revolvers also look beautiful, they showcase good old world craftsmanship - something generic .22's just don't have.
     
  15. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    Revolver/semi-auto or even what calibre matters little, they all work just if fine!
    Feed them decent ammo and care for them and they will serve you well.
    Most important thing is that you can shoot them well, and shoot them well on any day in any conditions!
    and when you are sick, injured, tired, starving, hungey or just scared shitteless!

    When a pistol is needed so is accuracy, shot placement is everything!
    So I recommend the most powerful pistol you can shoot accurately under the worst of conditions!
    After twenty years of trials the most pistol I can shoot accurately under adverse conditions is a full size 9mm!
    At the range I can shoot most any pistol accurately enough to win medals but that's under ideal conditions!
    And I would not feel undergunned with my old .22LR Beretta 76!
     
  16. Nedbushcrafter

    Nedbushcrafter Expert Member
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    If I had a choice of an old weapon I'd buy a sharps Buffalo gun maybe have a colt naval as a side arm both are excellent for black powder
     
  17. tb65

    tb65 Active Member
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    Revolvers are pretty old school but reliable. It's very rare that a revolver will jam, and it's hard to shoot it by accident. With a revolver you actually have to pull the trigger. Semi autos are quicker but have to be carefully maintained and handled. Regardless of what kind of gun it is it depends on who has it, any gun in the wrong hands can be dangerous or ineffective.
     
  18. CivilDefense

    CivilDefense Expert Member
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    The same can be said about essentially every automatic ever produced. In fact, most autos have more safety mechanisms than revolvers. The only automatic I'm aware of that will fire without depressing the trigger is the unbelievably bad Type 94 Nambu. Fortunately, that monstrosity hasn't been produced since the Second World War.
     
  19. tb65

    tb65 Active Member
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    Oh no buddy there are plenty of semi autos and autos that will fire from a tap. The Glock 40 is a main example, this is what Plaxico Burres shot himself with, he didn't even pull the trigger it just slipped down his pant leg. Here's an example of a guy who tries to do a quick draw but doesn't understand the difference between a revolver or semi auto.
     
  20. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    That guy is a classic idiot!
    He has a skinny persons holster and a silly gun!

    If you are going to carry a silly gun on a fatso's belt you need one with a large fat shield or silly things happen!
    If he must have a pistol in that location the pistol, holster and gut need to mesh together properly!

    His choices to fix that are firstly a fat-shield, secondly an empty chamber, thirdly a crossdraw holster and fourth a pistol with a manual safety!

    oh and he needs to get the lead out of his feet, the target has a gun aimed at him yet he fails to even step aside!
     
  21. CivilDefense

    CivilDefense Expert Member
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    Well using that as the guide, plenty of revolvers, particularly older ones, can be discharged with a tap on the hammer.

    The guy in the video is an idiot. He also put his finger on the trigger during the draw and shot himself. :rolleyes:
     
  22. tb65

    tb65 Active Member
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    @CivilDefense Yeah but I have to agree this was a bad idea. But the fact that he chose to do a quick draw with a semi auto, when it was traditionally done with single action revolvers shows he underestimated this weapon. It's a good thing he was able to recover from this.
     
  23. CivilDefense

    CivilDefense Expert Member
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    Well, he certainly didn't understand his weapon or basic safety procedures that is for sure. Though I can tell you I've shot many, many thousands of rounds through the M1911A1* (both old GI style and newer designs) and never shot myself, or anyone else, even once. Keeping your finger off the trigger until it is time to send lead down range is true of any firearm.

    * This is the one I carry in my vehicle everyday:
    [​IMG]
     
  24. ZipMedia

    ZipMedia New Member
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    Handguns can be operated at the most basic with instructions that you can cover in five minutes plus a bit of personal safety and awareness. As long as you have it down, it's gonna beat a revolver any day of the weak.

    Handguns are important because they can not only be used in quick succession, but they also serve as an extension of your body. Competition shooting is a good example of this.
     
  25. My3Sons_NJ

    My3Sons_NJ New Member
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    Although I have a preference for the handgun (pistol) in almost all cases, especially for self-defense, I would actually prefer to have the revolver when I am at a shooting range since the slow reload time is not a factor and the feel seems a bit more natural in my hand. Obviously, I am no competitive shooter but I do admire their speed, accuracy and technique.
     
  26. CivilDefense

    CivilDefense Expert Member
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    I hear you. I'm mainly an auto guy, but keep some wheelguns. Not all that long ago I invested in a full-size, 6" barrel, stainless steel, 6-shot .357 Magnum, with quality adjustable sites. Now it is way to big for CCW, but I do carry it on the acreage in a holster. It is a sweet shooter and at practical ranges it is damn accurate.
     
  27. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    A revolver is a pistol a semi auto is a pistol a derringer is a pistol a small hand held muzzleloader is a pistol all handguns are pistols used right they are all deadly i use shoulder holster for most hide easy and belt free for other tools
     
  28. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    You also have the choice between single action or double action, but both require either shells or percussion caps & in a long term wilderness survival situation that can be a problem. Great for home use though if you stock up on ammo or caps.
    Keith.
     
  29. Doubletap45

    Doubletap45 New Member
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    First, I view either a pistol or revolver as an defensive weapon, not an offensive weapon. If I know I'm going into a fight, I want a rifle or shotgun.
    There are many factors as to which is the best weapon. If you have the strength, take time to train, learn and practice to clear jams, use good ammo and buy quality, I think a semi auto pistol is the way to go.
    Fast reloads, higher capacity and flatter to carry. I like bullets that are big to begin with also, like the .45acp. A 45 cal. revolver is simply too big to carry for most.
    For those who cannot train often, have physical issues or just plain prefer a revolver, they are an excellent weapon.

    I'm also a huge fan of having a weapon that fires a big enough bullet without excessive recoil to get the job done fast. While a .380, 22LR, 38 special or other smaller caliber is far better than having a rock or a stick, I'm a firm believer in carrying enough gun. I say this because as a LEO, I've seen too many cases where a hyped up doper gets shot multiple times and just keeps coming until they bleed out. Short of a head or spine shot, they don't just fall down.
    In semi auto, a 9mm is the least I'd use and only with premium ammo. A .40 cal is a good round, but has sharp recoil. The .45acp has very manageable recoil and is a proven stopper. It's what I carry. A .380 in a pocket or 2" Chiefs Special in an ankle holster is a back up weapon for me.

    When it comes to revolvers, .38 special with a +P, HP bullet is the minimum. The .357 magnum with the 125 grn HP load is a fantastic stopper, but the recoil is not conducive to fast follow up shots for the average person and if fired in a closed room, plan on burst ear drums.
    If you can carry a .44 special or .45 acp revolver, they are excellent stoppers.
    Use only proven hollow point ammo, no FMJ.

    My opinion is to carry as much gun as you can, keeping training, recoil and stopping power in mind. It's not always easy to carry a full size pistol or revolver, but try to find a way to do it if you can. If you can't carry a full size weapon, at least carry a compact in a major caliber.

    Don't send a boy to do a man's job when your life is in the balance. This I say from years of experience, not what I have read somewhere.
     
  30. Mauser'sDaDa

    Mauser'sDaDa Member
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    There are reasons I chose a semiautomatic pistol.
    A. I run both a 1911 .45 and a Wonder 9. 1911s and magnum revolvers are woods pistols. Woods pistols are for facing deadly wildlife with large FMJ or non-hollow point expanding bullets.
    B. The town pistol. This is a wonder 9, Ultra .45, or Hyper 10 stuff. Town pistols hold at least 13 rounds and are meant for stopping gang jumps.
    C. The Hybrid: This is a 10MM or .45 acp pistol that holds at least 13 shots. They are good for either town or woods work, too. But they tend to be pricier than a basic Wonder 9 or 1911, too

    The rural outlaw culture has been emboldened by the 1977 removal of automatic weapons from the WVSP. They have actually counted the shots of revolvers and then gang rushed the likewise -armed defender, too. There's a reason why state trooper families were labeled 'little Nazi @#$%!' and it was because they saved their troopers' lives by buying them M-1 carbines, SKS and AKs to carry on duty to augment their firepower-challenged ,357 magnum revolvers and pump riot shotguns. This is why I vowed in 1977 I will never back an assault weapons ban, period!

    Also, I studied handgun history for many years before adopting my current choices. The fact Bat Masterson and Winston Churchill both preferred the semiauto pistol to the revolver that was common on both the American and African frontiers
    swayed me. Additionally, experiences in both WWI and Prohibition further convinced me my choice was right. Last several terrifying experiences, one of which happened to Aunt Sharon Gray.

    In 1969, Aunt Sharon Gray was living in an old 'company' mining shack with her then two pre-K kids. My late uncle Woody worked nights at Alloy. One dark night, a pack of violent drunks hit and scared her and the kids. Her pump shotgun jammed and only the timely return of my revolver-armed uncle prevented a potential mass murder. That same shotgun was pawned for a hyper-reliable Plainfield M-1 carbine that serves the Gray family even today.

    In 1982, a northern Florida couple were newly married. Both worked but had no telephone. One of six outlaw brothers got lusty for the same wife. One Thursday night, they got emotionally revved up and confronted her .357 magnum revolver-armed husband. They were all armed likewise, too. Mexican front porch vs. dirt driveway stand off. Just before dawn
    they fled suddenly and without explanation. Wordlessly, this same couple got in her pick up truck and drove towards Tampa. She took her money jar and that same revolver with her. They returned with two Iver Johnson M-1 carbines and two 9mm VP-70 H&K pistols, too. Saturday, the 6 outlaws returned. The wife aimed a carbine with a 30 round box mag at the center of their front windshield. They immediately left without incident and never returned, too.

    And remember the 'rooftop Koreans' during Rodney King 1992? Or how about the WV Derecho of 2012? I kept a loaded WASR-10 grab ready by my bed, too. All over the radio, the local police were telling they were on their own and just to shoot thieves taking advantage of the blackout, too.

    I understand that for people with limited dexterity, but a double action revolver makes logic. But I'm sticking to my semiautos.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2020
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    1. TMT Tactical
      I agree, limited capacity and slower reloading are relegated to outdoor / woods adventures. Urban animals tend to roam in packs and dealing with them requires the ability place lots and lots of rounds downstream very quickly.
       
      TMT Tactical, Jul 4, 2020
  31. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    In my heart, I prefer the revolver. In my head, I prefer the pistol.

    I could rant for hours about the potential beauty of the revolver. I love the .357 mag revolver with adjustable sights. I love the .357 lever carbine with 16" barrel that is so handy, that hardly recoils at all, but delivers devastatingly lethal results ... times 9 cartridges in its tube mag. and one in its nose. I am a rifleman and wish rifle accuracy in a handgun. To an attacker, I'm a dangerously accurate shooter and have no qualms about killing. Lever carbine, revolver backup, speed-loaders. Me, I feel OK with that. What about a new shooter? How long would it take that person to come up to speed in the use of this combo? I know me. But, what about a new shooter? I can't go back that many decades (half-century) in my memory to empathize with that novitiate -- I know not what I know. It's just "in me" now.

    When it comes to a serious self-defense go-to, what do I have? What's in my pocket right now? It is a pistol loaded with a double-stack mag. What's in my other pocket? Another double-stack magazine.

    Forgive me for running-on, but in today's madness, secondary to the breakdown of civilization, one requires very many rounds of ammunition -- many rounds ready to be fired RIGHT NOW! Witness in the news (that which is allowed to be shown by communist editors) how individuals and vehicles loaded with family are being surrounded by out-of-control savages. Put yourself in that hellish situation! How is one to extract oneself and their family from that mind-numbing apocalypse?! They'll block your vehicle with a stolen vehicle in front and a stolen vehicle slammed-up behind you. The only things on your side are having many rounds at the ready and the lack of courage of these non-men. It is not within them to fight to the death -- that is one thing that does work for you.
    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2020
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  32. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    This is a pistol thread, yet I'm going to first show a video addressing firing from/around a vehicle with a semi-auto rifle carbine. I'm old, do forgive. I don't think I have a fever. I have my reasons, bear with those "getting on in years".



    Now, the handgun:

     
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  33. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Drawing your weapon from inside a vehicle



    This for those who use an appendix holster. My paternal grandpa, NOT me.



    Back to shooting from a vehicle



    Military techniques handgun then rifle





    NOTICE THE VARIATIONS IN TECHNIQUES AND RESULTS!!!!!!!!!!

    Guess what, we live in a SEMI-predictable world!!!!!
    .
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  34. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    Carried my Ruger GP 100 .357 Magnum Revolver all this holiday weekend...though I was mostly out in the country and they have very little two legged wildlife running loose out there.

    Also carried three speed loaders and a wallet case containing a mix and match of Hornday 158 grain HP and also 180 grain cast lead flat points.

    I also carried in the back of my car a Henry lever rifle in the same calibration.... .357 Magnum.

    The nice thing about this revolver and rifle is that they will shoot both .357 Magnum rounds and also .38 Special ammo as well.

    If I want to go bigger in revolvers I can switch to .41 Magnum and also have the rifle for it.

    For most of my uses, however, the .357 Magnum works out fine...and ammo can be found coast to coast in this country and in .38 Special as well.

    One cannot always say that about the .41 Magnum and thus I buy and put back plenty of brass for it and roll my own ammo...for said calibration.



    I like and prefer wheel guns...and only have two autos...a Ruger Government in .22 LR ...a very very accurate .22 semi auto ….

    I also have a 1911...in .45 ACP..and only carry it on certain occasions...it is a Kimber and it is very accurate..


    But I mostly like wheel guns..


    Also...for the most part...In heavy pistil calibers....the field is mostly revolvers....not semi autos....

    The exception of which I am familiar is the Desert Eagle..semi auto. There may be others...but if so I am not familiar with them.

    Still ….mostly I Like wheel guns.


    Watcherchris]
    Not an Ishamatlite.
     
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