Poisonous food

Discussion in 'Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food' started by Nero-Bianco, Jun 7, 2016.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. Nero-Bianco

    Nero-Bianco New Member
      3/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    How exactly would you know if a food is poisonous? Is this just something people learn and then pass on, or is there some way to ascertain from looking/smelling/touching the food?
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  2. tb65

    tb65 Active Member
      33/47

    Blog Posts:
    0
    The best thing to do is get a book on edible plants. Instead of guessing what is edible and what is not, this might be the safest thing to do. I saw a book like this online not too long ago. Being able to identify plants starts with a knowledge of them, you can also go outside and see if you can find any. I've found a few things that I could eat or make tea out of right in my back yard after reading about edible plants.
     
  3. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
      130/140

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Thre are some chemical treatments to detect cyanide, arsenic, heavy metals and formadehyde. In survival circumstances, is quite unlikely to find any deliberately poisoned food but flora and fauna that are lethal for human consumption. Spoiled meat is easy to detect due to the foul smell of decomposition, and for poisonous animals (dart frogs for example) I suggest to be wary of colors, the color of an insect,amphibian or reptile can provide you a hint whether is poisonous or not.
     
  4. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    Nero-Bianco likes this.
  5. jonthai

    jonthai New Member
      8/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    It's mostly something that we acquire from someone else.There are many books , websites and other sources on how to tell if something is poisonous or not.Usually there isn't a way of telling if something is poisonous just by it's look, so it's best to have knowledge on poisonous foods.With many resources out there i'm sure you can find something.
     
  6. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
      230/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    For the most part, where I grew up, I know what to eat and what not to eat because I was taught at a young age while on the trail or at the beach, as to what is edible and what isn't. If you threw me in the the jungles of a remote South American country, I wouldn't know what to eat exactly. I can spot well know fruits but those that are location specific, forget about it.

    I'm from Hawaii. I can survive near the beach or in the forest mountain tops. When it comes to the dessert or snow, I'm a bit lost. I'm studying up on those weather specific places, but experience is the best guide. I need to get out there.
     
  7. John Snort

    John Snort Well-Known Member
      92/93

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I've heard of the universal edibility test. Works thusly:

    1. Use the skin contact test — crush the plant and apply some of it's sap on your skin. If it causes some irritation then that plant is probably poisonous. If doesn't, proceed to step #2.

    2. Use the Chew test — chew a small part of the plant and keep it in your mouth for 15 minutes. If there's some reaction, spit out and forget about eating it. However if there isn't any reaction swallow it and don't eat anything else for the next 8 hours.

    3. If after 8 hours you there are no ill effects, that you'll know that the plant you were testing probably isn't poisonous.
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    if you don't know whether a plant is poisonous or not don't eat it.
     
    John Snort likes this.
  9. Nero-Bianco

    Nero-Bianco New Member
      3/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Yes, I have heard of the books, this is definitely a good place to start. I suppose if I see something that's not in the book I should just stay away from it just in case! Haha.
     
  10. Nero-Bianco

    Nero-Bianco New Member
      3/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Thanks for the step by step method, it's very useful! I think I would be a bit too cautious for the Chew test though, maybe I could chew a very small amount for a few minutes and see if anything happened. Not sure I'd have the confidence to swallow it though!
     
    John Snort likes this.
  11. tb65

    tb65 Active Member
      33/47

    Blog Posts:
    0
    That sounds like a good idea. It's better to be safe than sorry, and there are a lot of things you may find that are edible anyway. I was surprised how many things I saw outside that are edible, even dandelions.
     
  12. Toast

    Toast New Member
      8/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I think just doing your research before hand, is probably your best bet. Look up what poisonous plants, and what safe to eat plants, are around the area you're going too. There are usually some telltale signs if something is edible or not. And it's really important that you know what's edible too. You can't afford to eat something poisonous out in the wild. If it doesn't straight up killing you, getting you sick could be hugely detrimental in all situations.
     
  13. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
      277/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    With insects, I would probably not eat one that is alien to me. With animals, the same thing applies. And with vegetation, I would use my olfactory nerves to ascertain if the food is edible. The odor of the fruit or vegetable can somehow tell you if it is edible. I remember the testing we did in our home economics subject in high school. There were 5 specimens on the table and we are to use our noses to determine if it can be eaten or not. Majority of the class passed the grade but there are those who failed with the joke that they have clogged noses.
     
  14. Destiny

    Destiny Member
      18/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    It's probably best to learn beforehand. Some plants and such are obviously poisonous others are subtle.
     
  15. neoKit

    neoKit New Member
      8/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Any expired food is poisonous and should not be consumed. Food can be contaminated by not keeping it safe or refrigerated. Any food that has started growing moulds should be rendered poisonous. Food can be poisonous even when it does not smell.
     
  16. hades_leae

    hades_leae Active Member
      48/93

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I have always wanted to know this, I was doing some research on how to kill, gut, and cook a rabbit, rats, snakes, and a many other animals that I could eat in order to survive. Then I came across a blog post where they were talking about not knowing if what you caught had some type of disease.

    The only way to find that out would be to have the instruments that we use in today's live stock processing warehouses. Not ideal in a SHTF type of scenario. I don't want to die from eating a rat with a disease.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Are There Any Other Uses For Potentially Poisonous Mushrooms? Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food Jul 10, 2017
Identifying Poisonous Bugs Finding Edible Animals and Bugs May 18, 2017
Poisonous berries. Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food Jun 20, 2016
How do you know if a Berry or Plant is poisonous. Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food Jan 17, 2016
Los Angeles Food Storage Question Food Storage - Canning/Freezing/Butchering/Prep Sep 6, 2020
Fishing For Food Finding, Identifying, and Preparing Food Aug 23, 2020
Survival Food Pyramid. Food Storage - Canning/Freezing/Butchering/Prep Aug 17, 2020
Adding To Stockpile: Goya Foods News, Current Events, and Politics Jul 11, 2020
Some Tips On Food Storage For Home Food Storage - Canning/Freezing/Butchering/Prep May 22, 2020
"survival" Bag Of Food; Helps Small Businesses. Responders News, Current Events, and Politics May 15, 2020

Share This Page