Prepared 200 Cases Of .357 Magnum Starline Brass

Discussion in 'Guns, Knives, Tools, Etc.' started by watcherchris, Dec 28, 2018.

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  1. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Spent some time out in my garage this morning to prepare 200 cases of Starline .357 Magnum brass.

    Awaiting 300 cast flat wide nose gas check bullets to arrive. Planning to make another order of these for a second time.

    These cases have been sized, deprimed, flared on the lip for bullets and primed.
    Now they have been placed into a sizeable Tupperware container until my bullets arrive.

    My Hornady reloading manual has a table for 180 grain bullets at about 900 to 950 FPS which is fine for me at that weight bullet. 180 grains is a heavy bullet in .357 caliber....and in a .357 Magnum case.

    Giving some thought to switching from IMR 4227 to Alliant 2400 powder for these loads after studying my Hornady reloading charts.

    I am interested in energy delivered ...not blinding light speed here in both GP 100 Pistol and Henry lever rifle.


    ad9a6d732b608a2f8f0ece353418af54.jpeg



    Also yesterday I purchased another bottle of Goslings 151 proof rum to go with a previously purchased bottle.
    ad9a6d732b608a2f8f0ece353418af54.jpeg


    These two bottles to go with these other six bottles...of Bacardi 151 Rum I keep in my radio room.

    To my astonishment a few months ago...I went to buy some more of this Bacardi 151 rum and discovered that Bacardi no longer makes this stuff. I am now sitting on collectors bottles of rum.

    Hence I have been slowly purchasing another brand.

    ad9a6d732b608a2f8f0ece353418af54.jpeg

    Don't misunderstand me here ...

    I am not advocating drinking and reloading or drinking and firearms...the two with me do not mix. This is a strict rule of mine. I can do stupid ...stone cold sober and have the scars in testimony to this sobriety and stupidity.

    I have just been augmenting some of my preps/barter/trade supplies with this latest alcohol purchase.


    My non Ishmaelite .02,

    Watcherchris
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2018
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  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Good barter material. POST SHTF, good booze, tobacco are going to be in demand for barter. Luxury items will be the first to disappear and not return for a very long time. When you can't buy your food at the store, tobacco crops take less priority. Food crops first.
     
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  3. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Quite right...food and medicines first.

    Alcohol is only purchased with extra monies and not high on the priority list...hence taking my time in acquiring these stocks. One of the bottles of Bacardi 151 is about 10 years olde since purchase but I expect at such octane ratings shelf life is quite good...a long long time.

    Thinking about a significant order for powdered eggs. But powdered eggs prices went through the roof a few years back and did not come down. This puzzles me and has the feelings of the .22 long rifle ammo shortage under the Obama Administration...man made.

    Someone has been removing eggs in powdered form off the market...for a reason.
    Just my speculation...you don't have to buy into that one.

    Also considering putting back some more powdered milk.


    Been wondering about putting back tobacco....but cigarette cartons seem not practical for long term storage.
    Thinking about tobacco in tins like pipe tobacco or such....and rolling papers as in the olde days...would be the way to go for long term storage.

    Not sure about tobacco storage...

    I should research this...but it too is not a priority per se...except as a barter item as I do not smoke......but do put back plenty of disposable lighters.


    Watcherchris,

    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  4. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    @watcherchris

    I think tobacco would have to be vacuum sealed, Tobacco will go stale, even in their little packs. Pipe tobacco will be a better but or loose cigarette tobacco, vacuum sealed. I would go with the loose cigarette tobacco (my game plan). Easy to store and hide. Remeber there are no ex-smokers, just those waiting to start again. High stress situation, make for high demand for tobacco. JM2c
     
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  5. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    I have my Dad's olde 30.06 Hunting rifle made in Germany after the war. It is a sporterized 98 Mauser converted to an American calibration via a German Gunsmith. It is outfitted with a German style scope with the heavy type European Crosshairs on a removable scope base. The rifle has also Iron Sights and double set triggers. Very nice bluing on it.
    Talk about a sensitive trigger once the set trigger is pulled. But I understand that is the European style set up of the day.

    But after the War my Dad told me it cost him 20 Dollars American and two cartons of Lucky's to get the gunsmith to do this work.. Cigarettes were as good as cash in the post war German economy.

    No telling for what that gunsmith could have traded two cartons of Lucky Strikes.


    Yeah.......while it is not important per se... as compared to other prepper/survival items...I think of tobacco in like manner to alcohol....a trade/barter item. However ..though I am not a big drinker..I am also aware of some medicinal properties of alcohol.

    It is in that vein for which I am thinking on it.

    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  6. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Not a drinker (mild allergy to alcohol) but I am am ex-smoker (still holding off) but I do know that a recently addicted smoker will pay through the nose for a nicotine fix. The alcohol can be distilled and home brewed, but raising tobacco will be a different story. Just think about how many little sandwich bags (vacuumed sealed) could be hidden in between wall studs? Tobacco has always and still is a super black market (barter) item. Vacuum sealing is the key. Just left in a sealed baggie and it will go stale. Stale tobacco sucks, it still can be burned (smoked) but the smoker will not let you forget just how bad it was, once they finish it. Stale is better than none.
     
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  7. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    My Bullets came today ....and I hope to be out in my garage later tonight reloading them...some 200 rounds.

    Plan to go across town for another bag of .357 Magnum Starline brass 100 count and a pound of Alliant 2400 powder.

    The are nice looking bullets with the gas check on the bottom of the cast lead.

    Will be weighting and putting my micrometer to them...as well.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2018
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  8. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    200 cases reloaded....and on the ready line.

    Did not make it across town to get the Alliant 2400 powder. Another day perhaps.

    Loaded these rounds with IMR 4227 powder...to some 900/950 FPS.

    Hope to get to try them out soon.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  9. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    @watcherchris

    Please keep us informed as to your progress and the results. I don't reload now but I plan to start in 2020.
     
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  10. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    When combining alcohol consumption with ammunition reloading we are confronted with the conundrum of "mystery loads" -- love them or avoid them?

    For the brave of heart (otherwise referred to as "stupid people") such loads present a challenge. Will heavy shooting gloves prevent flying phalanges? Will a really, really, really firm grip prevent excessive recoil from embedding the handgun's front sight into one's forehead?

    I will leave these adventures to others more sophisticated in such sciences. Cheers.

    af89993e3085709a19d2369edb34a5a1.jpeg
     
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  11. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    My folk grew their own tobacco.
     
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  12. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
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    I wonder how fast one can drive full wadcutter .357 diameter lead bullets. I know that one can alloy lead very hard and drive them fast -- folk do that with rifles.

    I'm thinking gas checked bullets and soft lead full wadcutters.

    I found an article (includes .41 mag. info):

    http://www.lasc.us/Fryxell_Book_Chapter_10_GCkorPB.htm
     
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  13. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    thanks Olde Geezer for the link. I've book marked it for quick reference when needed and will send it on to some who also reload.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  14. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Have sent off today another order for 38/180gr. WFNGC .358 dia ..same amount...300 count in three 100 count boxes.

    Will be preparing 100 .357 Magnum cases for these reloads.

    Also bought two boxes....of 325 count Winchester .22 long rifle ammo and will be putting it aside.

    Thanks,
    Watcherchris.

    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  15. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Those 170 to 180 lead bullets make great hog hammers. I always wanted a progressive press but never put out the money for one. I have a Lyman Turret Press and a couple of single stage presses. Several of the Lee loaders and one of the Lee hand presses for using carbide dies at the range.

    I think that the Lee Loaders all in all are the best way to start reloading. they aren't as fast but when you start they give you a clear and total understanding of the process. I have tried to have all of my primary calibers in Lee loaders as well as the dies for them. Even the Lee scoops are great and I often use them when I am loading hot max level loads or loading the IMR stick powders that don't go well in my powder measures. . I use the scoop that is nearest but below and put it in the scale pan. I then use a powder trickler to finish it off.

    The only thing left that I want is a Lee Loader in 12 ga. I have one in 20 ga and have made one for the 410. i have never shot trap or skeet so never needed a press. I even have a Herters loader which is like a lee loader in 10 ga.

    Along with saving you money, reloading offers you a better range of loads and as you progress a far better round. Every gun barrel is different and has a sort of frequency. When you get the load just right the groups seem to just come together. The thing is that two rifles of the exact same make, model and age will not have exactly the same frequency. For me it was a rewarding hobby for a long long time.
     
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  16. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    @TexDanm

    I do not reload now but I plan to start in 2020. The Lee loaders system is on on my list. I am looking at the progressive set up. I think a turret may be good or even better. I am still investigating. I plan to have a lot of different calibers, so the Lee appears to be the most economical with good quality. I am waiting to the beginning of 2020 due to budget constraints. 2019 is dedicated to buying the rifle series I want and of course then they need scopes and all the little items that seem to be never ending. I have budgeted the money (spreadheet) for the rifles and the reloading equipment. Sure would be nice if I won the lotto. :D
     
  17. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Texdanm

    Bingo..in the X ring here....

    I am interested in deep penetration and also serious energy delivery...not light speed.


    I was stunned some years back to find a u tube video of a fellow shooting a hog..not a big one but a hog nonetheless..with an Air Rifle shooting a 45 caliber lead bullet and it went right through the hog....and the hog bled out big time. I believe the cast lead air driven bullet was some 300 plus grains...and it penetrated beautifully. I did not expect that from an air delivered cast bullet.


    Bingo again ...in the X ring again. That is how I started...with a 7.7mm Japanese Lee Loader and a .30 Carbine Lee Loader.

    Later I got a 30.06 Lee Loader.

    Soon enough I got a RCBS single stage press...and never looked back.

    Quite Correct again in that the Lee Loader is not fast but it gives one the basics of what is happening and where one needs to go...and how to get there.


    Yup ..I too do this...mostly with longer range rifle loads...and in particular when making accurate rounds and after more careful and meticulous case prep.


    Amen on the saving money..in particular if you are going to be shooting a lot.

    Some of the olde timers at the gun club have told me that a gun can be different in how it performs though made on the same machinery and one serial number apart.
    Now in my younger days..I was a bit astonished ..but have long since realized there was some truth in this.


    I like doing what I call knocking about at my reloading bench in my garage... a cup of coffee..a cold drink in the summer..and sometimes a sandwhich and some music then I am good to go for hours.
    And yes..it is rewarding when you figure out a certain load for a certain firearm.




    TMT Tactical ....If you have questions when you begin reloading...just ask. I am certain there are enough of us on here who will be glad to give assistance to your questions.


    I have a four position Lee Turrent press which was purchased after I upgraded from a single stage RCBS Rock Chucker.

    The Rock Chucker was purchased after questioning members on another site.
    I like to form one Caliber of brass into another.....as certain calibers an be quite expensive and hard to find in many gun stores.

    7.7 Japanese Arisaka...is one of those. I found that I could reform 30.06 caliber brass into 7.7mm Japanese Arisaka....and reload with .303 British bullets. It worked out fine and saved me a lot of monies.
    A fellow at work has the same rifle and talked me through what it takes and how to do it..and I've never looked back.

    You need good case lubrication and then use a full length resizing die...push the shoulder back and cut off the excess length in the case. Reload with the proper amount of the right powder and press in the .303 bullets.

    You need a heavier than regular press to do this along with good case lubrication...and the Rock Chucker covers this labor nicely.

    I can make .308 brass from 30.06 brass and also .243 brass from .308 brass....
    This was an experiment to see how well it could be done. I can buy plenty of .308 and .243 Brass at Bass Pro..but should ammo become scarce..I can cover some of this by forming my own brass.

    I can make 7mm TCU brass from .223/5.56mm brass. This is for a Thompson Contender Pistol...which shoots a .223/5.56mm case necked up to 7mm/.284 diameter bullet.

    Just some of the things I learned through the years of "knocking" around out in my garage.


    Nonetheless....there are plenty of folks who would be happy to help out another reloader...2A individual.

    Gentlemen...keep them in the X ring.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
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  18. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    @watcherchris

    Good post and very valuable information. I am positive I will need a ton of help once I start into the reloading process.
     
  19. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I love the Lyman turret for pistol rounds and small rifle rounds like the 223 and such but have a big heavy Hornady single stage and an RCBS single stage for rifle rounds. They have more leverage. I have been lucky and walked into a couple of great deals where I picked up basically entire reloading setups from people that inherited it and had less than no interest in it.

    When you start to reload your best friend is going to be a good reloading manual. I started with a Lyman but have also added a couple of others. I also have gotten reloading charts from all the various powder and bullet makers.

    Reloading is a very precise sort of thing but if you will just pay a little attention to the set up and details it is a safe and rewarding hobby. I used to get everything set up and then turn on the radio and start running. When loading volumes it is all about repetitive actions. You do the same thing every time and you will get consistent results. This is especially true with powder measuring.

    As Chris said, if you have questions don't be afraid to ask.
     
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  20. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    by Texdanm,

    Exactly correct. I started with an olde single stage and simple RCBS press....

    Someone gave me a three position Lee Turret press..and I broke it trying to resize one type of brass to another caliber.

    This caused me to look carefully at my starting RCBS press and then I spent the money on the Rock Chucker...and it has plenty of leverage...exactly what is called for in resizing brass from one caliber to another.

    It was later when I decided I also wanted a four position Lee Turret press. I often use the Lee Turret press for sizing..and the Rock Chucker for seating the bullets...

    Other than that the Rocker is for serious sizing of one type of brass to another.


    You know Texdanm...I am astonished at this book I have titled "The Handloaders Manual of Cartridge Conversions."

    The very wealth of information in it. Mind you ...I never want to have some of those exotic calibers...but there they are if needed.

    Also I was not aware of the very existence of some of the various calibrations out there.....both European and also here in American Standards. Many more calibrations than that for which I've ever heard their names and or numbers.



    I am on my second set of Hornady Reloading Manuals. My older set... which I have not thrown away...is only one book. This newer Hornady manual has the standard tables and the other book has the various velocity tables in it.

    Also since my first Horndy manual there have come about a new and wider selection of not only powder and primers..but also bullet designs as well.

    For certain tasks I attempt it is always good to have reference material...manuals/books and as up to date as one can acquire.



    Bingo again.


    TM Tactical...


    Some of us are men of discipline..and reloading is a skill..a definite discipline..

    Make a dumb mistake and it can hurt you bad...and many of us have been there in our occupations. We know to use thinking..and not be easily affrighted....but disciplined. No two legged wildlife need apply.

    We like to think that up to a point and in a certain manner ...we have what it takes to master a task...not have it master us...nor beat us down...get the best of us.

    Reloading is no different ....

    Don't respect it and it will hurt you ....

    Respect it and you can get great results and a lot of satisfaction in doing it yourself and great savings if you shoot a lot.

    I am ever grateful to the Olde Timers at the gun club for helping me out with many of my reloading issues.

    Once again Gentlemen....Keep them in the X ring.


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2019
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  21. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Some things you can only learn through experience. One of the skills you learn over time is how to read your cases and especially the primer. When you fire a round the pressures fire form the the case to fit the chamber perfectly. You can learn a lot about the pressures by looking closely at the case and especially the primer. As the pressure mounts the primer begins to push back and square off the corners. Then it will start extruding the primer back and around the firing pin. A little dimple is a sign that you have maxed out this load. If you go past this it will crater and possibly blow out. As all of this is happening you will also see the leading edge of the case begin to lengthen and thin.

    One of the things that is good about the Lee loaders is that they are very safe lower pressure loads. That is exactly where to start.
     
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  22. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    First and foremost, I thank you all for the advice and offers of help. It will certainly be used. I am a nut for precisions. I will check and double check every step in the process. I will seek perfection in every round and create details notes. I am a retired Facility engineer. Casual is not allowed in my processes. The term good enough is not allowed near me. If I shot a 1.2" MOA, I would do whatever I needed to get to a 1/4" MOA and then hunt for the 1/8" MOA. That is just me. I am cheap but I do realize the value of quality. I put cheap optics on my plinkers but will spend the big bucks for quality for my shooters. I will take the offered advice to get a Rock Chucker press. I do want the most options possible. When the SHTF, ammo and brass is going to be where yo can find it. The ability to resize one caliber into another is going to be priceless. I spent more on the tools to build one AR15, that the AR cost. I will want the best loads possible. When it gets close to the actual buying, I will be calling out for all the advice I can get. Thanks for all the offers of help.
     
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  23. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    Wow TMT Tactical.../

    Ok...ok.... glad to hear it...

    So you know about working to certain scales on blue prints...tolerances et al...good!!

    I don't know if I told you but I work in a shipyard...wherein all the Nimitz class aircraft carriers were born...and also a number of submarines.

    Currently doing nuclear work...on carriers but occasionally get farmed out to the Submarine section when they need help.

    I am basically an outside machinist by trade but have special qualifications in the nuclear arena. We often work closely with both inspectors and engineers.
    And yes....they can become what we sometimes refer to as anal about making tolerances and specifications.

    It tends to go with the territory.

    I had one of the guys running a lathe make me a V block on the back shift one night. I use it with a dial indicator to do run outs on my more precision cases when loaded..and try to keep within .003 to .005 on the indicator.

    Texdanm too has worked at one time in a shipyard so he too is familiar with the precision requirements and techniques.



    Never built an AR...but have one. I seldom shoot it..but do like to use the special upper I have for it. It is a bull type stainless barrel at 20 inch length and it is a shooter ..even with the standard trigger pull.

    But I have learned that a sweet target grade trigger can spoil you..but it is not what one wants on a field or military grade tool.

    I tend to like accurate rifles and handguns. I'd rather shoot straight than shoot a lot. Just something I learned from the olde timers.

    I tend to prefer bolt actions....or lever guns...even a pump....in rifles...but try to make my shots do what I want them to do at a certain distance.


    Excellent that you recognize this. An Option. The thought has come to me many times...but also there is another thought concerning am I able to do this...do I have the right stuff ..so to speak...the personal challenge.



    Oh....a suggestion if I might.

    If you are going to roll your own ammo...and use a manual ...I suggest you get yourself some precision measuring equipment....

    IN this case a 6 inch dial caliper..or even today I believe a dial type may be difficult to find...most are electronic today.
    I have both. I like the dial type....no batteries to go bad on you..
    I also keep in my special reloading cabinet a 0 to 1 outside micrometer....as well as a 1 to 2 inch outside.

    But you get the idea. You need to be able to measure case dimensions and also bullet diameters....and the overall length of your reloads.

    You do not want your bullets seated out so far that they will not fit in your magazines or feed on your ramp ..or too long for the cylinder of a revolver. I think you get the idea...

    But all things in good time. Just a suggestion in planning for down the road....something in tooling for which to be aware.

    If we can be of help...just ask.

    Thanks and keep them in the X ring.

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2019
  24. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    @watcherchris
    In my younger days I also worked as a millwright. I own dial indicators, vernier calipers, micrometers and a level that measures in thousands of an inch. I have had a varied career. Anal retentive does describe well when it comes to my shooting. I will go cheap when cheap serves the purpose and top of the line when needed. My Ar setup has a 20" SS heavy barrel for my plinking and a 24" barrel for my more serious shooting. I use a left hand dual charging upper, because I shoot long guns left handed. I have discovered that my right hand side charging upper (7.62 x 39) actually works better for left hand shooting, easier to work the bold and still stay on target. I use a 3.5 pound trigger in th lower. Building an AR properly does require special tools. Barrel lapping tool, armors wrench, torque wrenches (foot pounds and inch pounds, drift pins, roll pin punches and the list goes on. I do admit I have never worked around nuclear material, that is an area I wold just as soon avoid. So my hat is off to you and Texdamn, ship yard work is difficult and dangerous.
     
  25. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
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    TMT Tactical,

    Ahhhhh...ok...I was wondering in the back of my mind.....when you mentioned Facilities Engineer.

    You are already tooled up in an important category. Great!!!

    A standard belt load out for me is my mag lite...and spare batteries...a set of those folding pliers....and a set of feeler gauges....in a Mag lite pouch...all of them on my hip daily.

    I have learned in particular... in this shipyard...that I never want to be caught without a light source...and or spare batteries.



    Yeah...I understand this and pretty much follow the same pattern...though I am constantly astonished at what one can pay for good optics..

    Started looking into night optics and again became astonished...even shocked.


    Ahhhhh...so you have an AR in 7.62x39mm. Great. I've learned to appreciate this calibration within its limits.

    Have often thought about a bolt gun in that calibration but for the price I figured I would stay with the SKS.

    Have found that I like the SKS rifle better than the AK series.

    Was stunned upon first time disassembly of an AK 47 to realize how cheaply they are made..and almost sufficient to give them away in corn flake boxes ...so to speak.


    I've done facilities work on our building to help them out when they are shorthanded. That too can be dangerous...if you are not aware of what you are about. Often working at great heights...and or in bucket lifts or scissor lifts.

    Steam heat in a facility can be very dangerous if you do not know what one is about.
    Worked a lot of steam systems in ship engine rooms. Hydraulics too.

    Rooftop ventilation systems....with those big fans....you make sure the power is secured, locked and properly tagged out. Those are big fans on some of those systems...

    But high voltage electricity is the one to make me pucker up..
    Hard to talk trash to electricity...particularly high voltage.


    Having first cup of coffee this morning....headed for a refill...
    Have a good day.

    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2019
  26. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Yes, facility maintenance can be dangerous. I fired one of my technicians because he jumper out a disconnect and I got hit with 220 volts. I was not a happy camper when I found his jumper setup. High voltage is nothing to play with. I had thrown the disconnect and locked it down, there should not have been any voltage present. That is when I learned to test the power circuits, even after the power is superposed to be off. Every trade does have it's dangers. Live steam is real dangerous because in many cases you can't see the leak and it enough pressure is pushing the steam, it can act like a laser and literately cut you apart. Not big fan of high pressure steam systems. Unlike the movies, you may not see the big steam jet.

    I do have the expensive measuring tools but the reloading presses and the million and one accessories will quickly add up. My last spread sheet had me at well over $1,800 for reloading equipment. And that did not include everything that would be nice to have (like the Rock Chucker). For 2019, I have budgeted $3,600 for all my shooing rifles, scopes, ammo and range visits. The start of 2020 I will begin buying the basic reloading items. I allocate $300 per month for my gun habit. Wish it could be more but other items have a priority too. The hard part is waiting for the monthly money to build up enough to get more items on the list. Patience in not one of my virtues.

    Now the scope market is wild, to say the least. I find a good deal on a scope and then discover it has Mil reticle and MOA turrets. That is a no-go. Then you watch one video praising a certain mode and the the next video says it is garbage. Then you have the Brand Whores, that praise all the big Brands, no matter how bad they may be or how over priced they are. It is driving me crazier than I normally am. Right now I am looking at the Vortex Strike Eagle 4 x 24 x 50. If I settle on it, I will have my son make the actual purchase, he can get a military discount, that will bring the scope price down a bit. The scope is a second focal plane, so I will have to learn about setting the magnification to the proper level to get accurate MIL readings. I will also have to learn about ranging in MIL's. I am an MOA thinker. I decided on MIL for faster and easier to remember turret adjustments. I was a bit disappointed to learn that Vortex is now having many, if not all their scopes assembled in China. I am trying to find another scope company that matches the Vortex warranty and prices but is assembled in the USA. Most will use Japanese glass or European glass, so for me, the key is where it is assembled. I am starting to develop a case of Paralysis by Analysis. Too much info and not enough decisions making.

    Back to the research.
     
  27. watcherchris

    watcherchris Master Survivalist
      330/345

    Blog Posts:
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    Went to get groceries yesterday.

    But before I stopped in the grocery store..I stopped at Bass Pro Shops.

    Bought one box of Hornday XTP Bullets in 158 grain hollow points in .357 diameter.

    One bag of 100 count .41 Magnum Starline Brass

    One bag of 100 count .40 S&W brass

    And One ....one pound can of Alliant 2400 powder.


    They were out of the .357 Magnum Starline brass for which I primarily went to Bass Pro Shops.

    I will make this purchase of .357 Starline brass at another time...another trip.

    Paid cash and did not fill out any other Ishmaelte stuff like ads or e mail...for which they ask addresses.


    Thanks,
    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
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