Proper Technique For Friction Fires.

Discussion in 'First Time Preppers and Survivalists' started by OneFoot, Jan 28, 2018.

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  1. OneFoot

    OneFoot Active Member
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    Hello everyone im not sure if this is where to post this..
    while i do love anything that has to do with me getting lost in the woods ive been mostly self taught
    and i have to admit that i am clueless when i comes to friction fires.
    could anyone explain to me the proper way of making a bow drill and how to properly identify materials for the hearth board.
    i guess i basically need step by step instructions pics would help lol
    thankyou all
    -OneFoot-
     
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  2. Bishop

    Bishop Expert Member
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    Start off with a easy one that most people don't even know about.


     
  3. Bishop

    Bishop Expert Member
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    Here is another one


     
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  4. OneFoot

    OneFoot Active Member
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    thankyou bishop i subscribed to your channel!!
     
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  5. Bishop

    Bishop Expert Member
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    Thank you will be doing a video on fire drill also
     
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  6. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    Here is A tutorial I put together about a year ago... I do intent to re-shoot this.. however I hope this can help
     
  7. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    My method is slightly different to most people's OneFoot, & I do not use any modern or man made products. These materials are for Australia, but you have a similar plant in the US known as the Yucca Plant. Soft woods for the drill & the fireboard makes the process of creating an ember much faster.
    Keith.

     
  8. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    cool Video Kieth, I have subbed you.
    Forgot to mention I am in southern Africa, however I was using Alder I believe, invasive species here (not indigenous)
    Willow works well if you have it, popular also.. wild fig.. etc. Pretty much any wood that is Soft, Pine might work if its not full of resin.. I have yet to try it, but I am sure it will if its a nice dry piece with out resin.
     
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  9. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    If you have any questions at any time, contact me.
    Keith.
     
  10. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    Thanks Kieth, I will do So :)
     
  11. Jim B

    Jim B Member
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    Thanks for the videos guys. I am trying it with my son. Got to get some cotton balls, but made a bow, and spindle so far but pine for the fireboard isn't working well. Used willow for the spindle but need to let it dry more I think. Good news is got a little smoke so far. Much practice needed I think.

    Jim :)

    P.S. Old smoker ran out of steam. LOL
     
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  12. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Jim, try using willow for the fire board & the drill bit.
    Keith.
     
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  13. Jim B

    Jim B Member
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    Thanks Keith, I have to do some pruning but that's what I will do. It's still winter here, so may have to get the wood stove going in the garage to get it dried out.
    Not giving up yet, that wouldn't be a very good example. :)
     
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  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    6619064a34aa078893f9ebf6c743aec9.jpeg
    Keith.
     
  15. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    Takes quiet a bit of practice, So dont give up.
     
  16. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I think that friction fires are a very localized sort of tallent. The problem that I have observed is that someone that can whip up a friction fire in minutes every time with THEIR board, spindle and bow don't do nearly as well when they have to start from scratch in the woods. This could be because I was raised in a very wet environment but it doesn't seem a lot better where I live now. Your success is very dependent on having the right woods and materials.

    If I have to carry the board, spindle and bow with me from home I would rather carry ferrocerium rods. They are lighter, smaller and easier to use. Making a friction fire from scratch is a totally different thing than it will be after you have a good set of tools for this. Making that first set though, from woods found in nature, is enough to make a grown man cry. If you are not extremely familiar with the woods where you live you can rub those things together forever and never get s fire.

    Now, I understand that being raised in a swamp probably has warped my view of this but I remember in Boy Scouts how well it worked in the meetings and how different it was when you had to make it all from scratch. Given the right stuff I can mostly rub up a coal and get the fire going but I really would hate to have to bet my life on it on a cold day in the woods.

    Like all knowledge it is worth knowing but I am just a little sceptical about depending on it for my survival.
     
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  17. Jim B

    Jim B Member
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    Thanks Dan and your point is well taken. I am trying to learn as many skills as I can that I don't know or could pick up with a little common sense, to enhance my abilities. To be honest, I have always been a firm believer that the simpler and quicker the better. In saying that, I don't see a disadvantage to a simple Bic's lighter as a first resort. Then have a backup skill that you can truly depend on when all else fails.

    I mean truly, how many of the average novices like myself that haven't been planning and preparing for a very long time, would be misguided by not trying to keep it simple. There is and always will be a chance for failure in all the facets of surviving. Options when possible, I would think, is only an advantage unless they create a deficiency of something more important.

    The one thing that I have already gotten from these forums, that personally I think most important, is knowledge is the key to our survival. Plus increases your own self value to others.

    Back to your point about the Friction Methods having flaws for a novice such as myself. I can't disagree with you and would be in denial if I even tried. I will still continue to practice the method more for my own satisfaction and that it does interest me. I would definitely like to have another fire making skill that may have a better success rate for beginners and novices alike.

    Friction Fire is a fascinating talent and I applaud the experts that keep old traditional skills alive.

    Jim :)
     
  18. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I have watched "experts" on TV that actually teach survival skills fail miserably because the location that they are at doesn't offer them the woods that they are familiar with. In some cases even when they have brought their own stuff from home they struggle for days because they can't find anything dry enough to make their tinder that they are used to. NOW to me that is sort of strange. A survival expert should know how to find dry wood even in a wet environment. Nonetheless is shows how hard it can be to do even something that you are good at in an unfamiliar environment.

    Fire is just so critical that you need to have as many different ways to make it as possible. I always carry at least three different ways to make fire in every kit and usually on my person at all times. I CAN make a fire with flint and steel but carry a ferro rod instead. I have made fire with bow and drill but honestly was never good at it even under perfect conditions. The fact that I have always been a big boy and not the most limber in the world probably had a lot to do with that.
     
  19. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    Friction fire is very hard when it is in a biome you not familar with, and when you have to find what will work,
    I have managed to do it once in such a scenario, to just see if I could.. I believe was day 3 out in A different biome to what I am familiar with, had not eaten etc.. when off to acquire materials and made a bow drill set, and I did manage to get it working, got a coal etc.
    But yes that is very hard to do, and one needs to be really well practiced before trying that... but For the most part I assume all Ancient people that where good at bow drill would have made their sets at home before embarking on a journey... I highly doubt many would have made them on the spot, it is possible but difficult especially if things are wet,etc.
     
  20. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I imagine that a well made bow drill kit was a much prized possession for a primitive man. They no doubt carried it from place to place and were very careful to maintain it and replace the parts as they wore out. Back then there really wasn't anything better available. I suspect that flint and steel were an amazing step up for them. I "THINK" that if I had to that I could put together a working bow drill kit. I understand the principal and have seen it done and made fire with one but Lordy I hope my life never depends on doing that!

    I think that is why I am constantly making ferro rod kits and sealing matches in 1/2" plastic drinking straws. I am never without at least three different ways to make fire. I also have a fresnel lens magnifier in my wallet and a BIC lighter in my pocket.
     
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  21. AntonyRaison

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    Same, Here hopefully my life wouldn't need to depend on it... I can do it sure but It's not ever something I would generally do unless its an absolute last resort.
     
  22. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Knowledge is a tool that is always worth having. I have said that I believe that I could be dropped butt naked in about any warm environment and survive. That is based on the knowledge that I have. There are lots of ways to make fire and given time I'm pretty positive that I would get it done one way or another. The more that you know the more options you have.
     
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  23. AntonyRaison

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    Bushveld of southern Africa is Harsh, Hot dry and arrid.... I am talking like 38 degrees Celsius hot in the shade in the highveld. And costal regions like the north coast more like 42 in the shade with 80% humidity.

    I much preffer winters here to be honest.
    That mixed with a drought can make this place unlivable in the bush, But it is what I know..
    Snow and really really cold weather, well Anything bellow like -5 degrees c is not something I am used to.
    But yes for the most part I would do okish in similar climates, pending my knowledge of the plant life,etc there.
    But yeah I dont have a doubt I make at least a week in most of these type of climates.
     
  24. AntonyRaison

    AntonyRaison Active Member
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    here is another video (tutorial I put together as part of an extended primitive skills/nomad skills video)

    Its at around about 40 seconds into the video clip on wards... ( you can watch the whole video if you like...
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2018
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