Quick Relief For Bee Stings

Discussion in 'Natural Medicine and Home Remedies' started by KinsleyMaverick, May 22, 2016.

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  1. KinsleyMaverick

    KinsleyMaverick New Member
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    Many years ago when I was a little girl, my mother was mowing the lawn and she mowed into a yellow jackets nest. Bless her heart, she got stung numerous times all over her legs. I couldn't have been more than 5 at the time, but I had been looking in my Dad's first aid books that he was given when he worked in the coal mines. I remembered seeing pictures of people getting stung by bees and the pictures showed that it would help ease the pain and swelling by putting ice on the bee stings. I told my mother this and she tried it and it actually helped her a lot. So, that being said, if you get bee stings (and hopefully are not allergic) the pain can be relieved by simply putting ice cubes in a zip lock baggie and holding it on the area where you have been stung.
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  2. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    When my husband was a young boy, they moved to a new home that is located in a rural-like area with no neighbors and plenty of trees and grasses. The adjoining lot to their property has a guava tree that was fruiting. His 5-year old brother went to the tree upon seeing the ripe guavas. But the little boy did not notice that there was a hive of wasp. He was attacked and stung all over his face. According to my mother-in-law, her son's chin and cheeks were so swollen that he looked like an alien. In fact, the mother screamed upon seeing the little alien entering their house.

    For the home remedy, my mother-in-law washed her son's face with table vinegar. Let it stay for a few minutes, she said. And within 30 minutes, the swelling subsided. Our family doctor said that excessive bee stings can kill the person for he can suffer acute allergy that makes it difficult to breath. So it is important to apply first aid to control the swelling otherwise the problem might escalate.
     
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  3. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Both good posts, thank you.
    Keith.
     
  4. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    I got stung mostly by wasps several times when I was a child and living in a lush jungle countryside. I told you all that, by own experience, is a poor idea to slash recklessly through dense undergrowth with a machete. You'll not see them coming if you do, and with them I mean a swarm of angry wasps. Anyway, To relief the pain, I remember my
    grandmother used some warm analgesic ointments, Vick Vaporub or mentol davis if I remember well. Quite effective to relieve pain.
     
  5. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Listerine mouthwash the old orignal brown stuff wiped on sting takes the pain away
     
  6. QtheMyst

    QtheMyst Member
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    I used to get a lot of bee stings, and my mother would make a paste from baking soda and water and put it over the sting. It really helped with the pain, and reduced the swelling. (I used to swell up a LOT from stings!)

    That said, I have noticed that I have not been stung again since I was a small kid, and I think you can usually prevent bee stings with some awareness, and proper footwear. I'm pretty sure almost all the times I was stung is because I either stepped on a bee in bare feet or accidentally swatted it with my hand/arm.
     
  7. John Snort

    John Snort Well-Known Member
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    Onions are another natural remedy for bee stings and wasp stings. When you are stung, slice up an onion and press the juicy part against the stung area. According to a chemist there are ingredients in onions which break down chemicals responsible for discomfort and inflammation. So should you get stung and there's an onion in your kitchen it could be the remedy that will provide you the relief you seek.
     
  8. SirJoe

    SirJoe Expert Member
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    I once got stung by an African bee, I remember that I was still young at the time but did something that you should never do. I tried to pull out the sting with my fingers and ended up squeezing all the venom into my leg. I ended up developing a a huge bulge in the place that I was stung. If you get stung be careful how you pull out the sting.
     
  9. BeautifullyBree

    BeautifullyBree Active Member
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    Chewing tobacco is an amazing cure for bee stings. Growing up anytime we would get a bee sting my dad would pull out a pinch of chewing tobacco. Yes! Already being chewed. The stinging would stop almost immediately. I know it sounds gross, but if I get stung by a bee tomorrow I'll be calling dad.
     
  10. Lakeisha Brown

    Lakeisha Brown New Member
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    I stuck my hand in a broken tail light. It was my brothers old car that had been sitting in my grandmother front yard for a long time. The inside of the light had a hornet nest. I was stung so many times that my entire arm was swolen. My Aunt chewed tobacco and she rubbed it all over the sting marks and my arm (gross right ?). Let me tell ya'll, it definitely worked.
     
  11. richj8am30

    richj8am30 Member
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    It would be best for you to use a knife and drain the sting by poking the hole where you have been stung slightly. Their stingers are still pumping the venom into your body even though the Bee is dead. The glycerin that is found in toothpaste can dry the venom out. I read that the nicotine from the inside of a pipe that is smeared upon a scorpion sting can help the pain to halt and subside. Ask a physician about tobacco products being used in this way to possibly cure bee stings as well.
     
  12. chelsknits

    chelsknits New Member
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    This is very true. I've done it every time that I've gotten a bee sting. However, about eight years ago I got stung and found out that I developed a bee allergy. Not fun at all. I spent the night in the hospital because my throat started to close and it was hard to breathe.
     
  13. AlexM

    AlexM New Member
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    In the past, I have used the same treatment for minor bee stings that I have for sunburns. The pain and irritation from both are pretty similar. Some Aloe Vera, coconut oil, and or anything that keeps your skin moisturized is very effective.
     
  14. DecMikashimota

    DecMikashimota New Member
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    When it comes to bee stings the most important thing you need to is get the stinger out of you. If you have killed the bee and are standing nearby it then get away from that area as soon as possible sense the death of the bee will let out a chemical signal. The stinger itself will have a sack on it, that is where the venom is. You can just wipe and pick this out with your finger and no harm will come to you so long as you are not allergic.
     
  15. chelsknits

    chelsknits New Member
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    I've never heard of any of those things for a bee sting before. Actually, I've never heard of coconut oil for sunburn before either. Very interesting!
     
  16. chelsknits

    chelsknits New Member
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    What do you mean standing by the dead bee will send our a chemical signal? I've never heard of this before.
     
  17. Bonzer

    Bonzer New Member
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    I readily agree with John Snort's post above. Raw Onion could provide quick relief from bees, wasps and bumble bee stings. Onions draw out and break down toxic chemicals in bee stings. The synthase enzymes in Onions reduce inflammation, pain, and swelling from bee stings. If the bee sting remains in your finger, carefully draw it out with a forceps.

    If you are attacked by a swarm of bees, you need to be immediately rushed to the nearby hospital as it could be potentially fatal.
     
  18. DecMikashimota

    DecMikashimota New Member
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    I was just making a sort of exaggeration as far as the terms "standing by the dead bee," goes. What I'm referencing is some smell or something to that effect that certain bees give off when they die, basically signaling to the other bees that are close enough to get the signal. If you gotten out of that area and other bees are near then you could be vulnerable for an attack.
     
  19. OfTheEarth

    OfTheEarth Member
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    Fenistill...I can't spell the stuff...that helps too. It also helps with burns and weird rash formations, I got stung by a bee with it and applied a bit of it and just stayed kinda puffy but zero of that tense tight pulsing agony. Just my 2 cents.
     
  20. filmjunkie08

    filmjunkie08 Active Member
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    Growing up where I got stung at least once a month, my mom always put ice on the site to help the sting and the swelling. What about mosquito bites? My dad would put aftershave lotion on it to stop the itching.
     
  21. chelsknits

    chelsknits New Member
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    Oh wow, I had never heard of that before. That's definitely good to know! Thanks for the further explanation.
     
  22. Karen Martin

    Karen Martin New Member
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    Good day, Team: I have found that quick relief for bee stings are lavender oil or aloe vera if you have some available! But if you don't have any of those items available just using your urine and ice will do the trick to help reduce from swelling and stinging of the infected area and any yeast infection cream or ointment will work as well for the pain relief!
     
  23. remnant

    remnant Expert Member
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    You can do well to use methylated spirit, it cools the pain as well as being an antiseptic. Pineapple juice is also a good anti-inflammatory agent as well and is good to prove swelling and pain.
     
  24. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    For wasp or hornet stings wash it with vinegar, wasp stings are alkaline so the mildly acidic vinegar neutralises the venom.
    Bee stings on the other hand are acidic so after scraping (no need to poke holes or dig it out, just scrape it off as if you were shaving) the beesting from your skin you can treat it with a mild solution of bicarbonate of soda or very mild washing soda. You must remove the sting immediately or it will continue to pump venom into you for up to 90 seconds and make the resulting sting much worse.
    Chewed tobacco contains nicotine which is a neurotoxin, it blocks the body's histamine response when rubbed onto an insect sting which give pain relief without actually treating the sting. Ice will also temporarily reduce the inflammation.
    When you get stung make sure that you know what stung you and treat it accordingly, a good clue is that wasps can each sting multiple times while each bee can only sting once.
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  25. Richa94

    Richa94 New Member
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    Baking soda and toothpaste provide quick relief in the bee sting. I tried this remedies once and get relief instantly. Bee stings are very painful and if not treated on time leads to swelling and itching of the skin.These home remedies are easily available and very effective at the same time.
     
  26. Kootenay prepper

    Kootenay prepper Expert Member
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    This has happened numerous times at work where workers come to grab tweezers to pull out the stinger. As you said any squeezing will only make the swelling and pain worse. I’ve been taught the best way is to use a credit card or something like it and slide it under and flick it out with it.
     
  27. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I always scrapped the stinger out with my pocket knife and then if I was bothered by it I would use a tobacco poultice to relieve the pain. I'm actually fortunate and don't seem to be bothered by bee and wasp stings as much as most people. I got stung 6 times not long ago working on some porch skirting. I just ignored them and finished the job up while I laughed at my daughter in law who was totally freaking out and she didn't even get stung. The next day I couldn't even tell where they had hit me. My daughter in law will swell up for a week or ten days and it will leave a bruise on her for almost a month. I'm afraid that someday she is going to go into anaphylactic shock as she gets older. Honestly wasp and bee stings just aren't all that painful to me. Now a scorpion put me on the ground one day. That raskil went down my collar and lit me UP!!!
     
    Ystranc likes this.
  28. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    You do right TexDanm, flapping about freaking out and trying to swipe at bees will just annoy them. They release signal pheromones when they feel threatened or when they sting, these pheromones cause others to attack so it is wise to just remove the sting by scraping it off and cover the smell. Tobacco smoke serves very well to calm bees but any smoke will do. It causes them to feed and load up with stored honey in case the fire (smoke) should spread to their hive. When they're full they're less aggressive.
    This doesn't work on wasps. I just set drowning traps for them or kill them in the nests.
    I actually keep bees so I tend to get really peeved at misinformation and absurdly happy when someone actually shows that they know what they're talking about.
     
  29. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Kept bees are extremely gentle little creatures. We always had the little blond Italian bees and never used a bee suit when robbing them. We almost never got stung unless a bee got trapped and panicked. I impressed my Grandbaby the other week end when we were camping. I gathered in a swarm of bees about the size of a basketball that had tried to set up in our camp. I just gently worked my hand into the ball and then carried it about 50 yards down the bank and gently shook them off. Not a single one stung me.

    I actually have pet red paper wasps. I live in the woods and you are GOING to have wasps. I kill the nest if they show aggression. After 15 years of this I can handle the wasps much the same is I do the bees. If they get in the house I take them back outside. I can walk up to a nest on my place and reach out to the nest and they will walk down my arm and never sting.
     
  30. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
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    The reason I kill the wasps is mainly due to the damage they can do to my beehive colonies. Sometimes you just have to choose which side you're on. This years long hot summer has meant that both species (along with all the fruit trees) have done very well but as the fruit ripens and some fallen fruit ferments the wasps can become more belligerent (bad news if they're near my home)
    I mainly keep the bees as pollinators for the benefit of our orchards but we also get quite a lot of honey off our hives.
     
  31. MisterHunter

    MisterHunter Well-Known Member
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    Make a poultice out of tobacco and apply to the sting site. It will both help with the pain and to a certain extent helps draw out the venom. I have used this approach both on myself and my kids and seems to really help.
     
  32. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    We kept bees mostly for their honey. Back then there was no shortage of bees for pollination unless you were a big acreage farmer or fruit grove owner. A friend had 500 hives that he moved from place to place and rented them to farmers. He would start in the south and then move them north as the flows started.
     
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