"rural Specific" Emergency Prep

Discussion in 'Community Sharing CSA Ideas' started by Pragmatist, Sep 3, 2019.

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  1. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
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    Just what the rural community needs, road maps for the thugs to follow when they need food. When you look at a university and government agency combining on the project, you just know the rural people are going to get screwed, some way, some fashion.
     
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  3. GateCrasher

    GateCrasher Expert Member
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    Good refresher, a few pearls of wisdom too. https://extension.purdue.edu/INPREPared/

    I've seen worse "GoBag" recommendations (https://extension.purdue.edu/INPREPared/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/GoBagGeneralEmergency.pdf).

    In the winter storm section is a link to a FEMA winter storm preparedness document which I had not seen before:
    https://www.fema.gov/media-library-...81d5bb12a/FEMA_2017_WinterStorm_HTP_FINAL.pdf

    With winter approaching (for those here not named Keith) it's worth a look imo. FEMA recommendations often get scoffed at by preppers as not being thorough enough, the oft quoted "3 days of food and water" recommendation for example, but a more careful reading (emphasis mine) shows that's the bare minimum:

    Being able to shelter in your home (in reasonable comfort) for a week or more without utilities or outside assistance is a good first goal for those new to preparedness.

    And under the "medications" section of the FEMA checklist is this:
    I suspect many preppers might not be able to check that item off, and for some of those that do it might only be because they read about (but never actually tested) how to make a zeer pot at a prepper site. Just my .02 but I think there is a lot of value to be found in these FEMA/government sponsored checklists, especially if you look at the reasoning behind each item, remember it's the bare minimum, and think about how to upgrade or extend it. Whistles for communication (listed in both the Purdue and FEMA checklists) for example, it's not a bad idea at all, and maybe there's even better communication devices available? (/sarc)
     
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  4. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    I think this plan has some merit. It wouldn't apply to me, but I can see how rural needs and preps require some special attention. If you had cattle or other animals in quantity I wouldn't know how to protect them from a disaster. We might have to worry about a few bottles under the sink, but a farmer could have drums of toxic chemicals which would be disastrous if spilled. How do you clean that up? How long will the soil be damaged?

    I have to admit I was a little puzzled by how Thunder could be considered a natural disaster. When they are including the first responders, the boots on the ground, in the planning stages IMHO they are heading in the right direction.
     
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