Scrapping: This guy converts an old-style TV into a 2000F heat focusing apparatus.

Discussion in 'Cooking and Cooking Utensils' started by Correy, Jun 1, 2016.

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  1. Correy

    Correy Expert Member
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    Some people in the comments suggested it be used as a water boiler as well, either for consumption or use it to spin a small turbine to generate electricity.
     
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  2. Arboreal

    Arboreal Active Member
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    Impressive! I need to read more on this topic, I didn't realise stuff like this was possible to build in your own backayard. Can you guys recommend some intro?
     
  3. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    Neat, a huge magnifying glass made from a scrapped 50" Toshiba TV. 2000f of heat is outstanding, and something that should be handled with the utmost care. Must be stored away from sun contact to avoid some messy accidents that could
    end up in starting a large fire in your house.
     
  4. Correy

    Correy Expert Member
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    ...I didn't think of that. Damn, that means a tossed TV can start a real fire in the woods, that simple...
    I think I would put it over a tank of water 24/7 to produce hydroelectric power, so that would eliminate the option of tucking the screen away.


    I hope someone does, because I find these thing in random...There's really no end to what we could do with our technological garbage, as long as we know what we're doing.
     
  5. hollowgirl

    hollowgirl Administrator Gold Supporter
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    This is neat! I may have to see if I can find an old TV around here!
     
  6. Duncan

    Duncan Expert Member
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    This is great! Quite a few years back, a couple of friends and I were looking at a Fresnel lens for similar experiments. We found out that, in addition to a point-focusing lens, there were also lenses which focused to a line. It seemed like an easy task to focus it on a copper pipe carrying flowing water and calibrate it to flash the water into steam which could drive a turbine. We actually designed (on paper) a system which would match water pressure to the boiling point and a way to recapture the steam and run it back (via a pump) to the cold-water tank.

    However, when we pencil-whipped the potential temperature of the tube if the water wasn't moving as fast as it should, the stagnation temperature would either melt the pipe or any welds used to build the system. Not being too anxious to take a test in first aid for third-degree live steam burns, we wimped out. I'd still like to try it, if I had a person who could do full-penetration welds in 304 stainless, but that is w-a-a-a-a-y beyond the level of expertise of me or anyone I know.
     
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