Take a survival pack when in the woods.

Discussion in 'Survival Stories' started by thetoad45, Oct 22, 2016.

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  1. thetoad45

    thetoad45 New Member
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    In the mid/late 80's I worked for a short time for the Washington Dept. of Game. That was before the state merged game and fish into the Dept. of Wildlife. I was sent out, with another guy, in a canoe onto an upper coastal river. It wasn't well thought out and we ended up humping the canoe over about 70 log jams. Eventually it dawned on us that we were not going to make it to the highway bridge before daylight ended. At dark we ditched the canoe and walked up to a small clearing. It then started to rain. I managed to get a fire going and the rain increased into a solid downpour that lasted all night without stop. We were not prepared for the elements and had only light clothing. I spent the night gathering wood, in the dark, to keep the fire going. Cold 45 degree rain saps your strength quickly. We had no food and no time to build a shelter. I could hear the ocean and knew we were not too far from the beach. Nobody came looking for us. Just left us out there. I kept hearing a bear circling us for a period of time. Had no weapons. In the morning we staggered 2-3 miles out to the highway and another mile or so down it to a phone. I was happy to get warm and dry. What did I learn from this? A couple of things. First off, a simple day pack filled with a couple cheap fire starters and fuel, small tarp, rope, knife, emergency packaged space blankets, camping ultra lite stackable cookware, small water filter and power bars would have made all the difference in the world. Second, a single shot small gauge shotgun taken down and put into the pack. Some argue a .22 is better but I disagree. During the entire time I saw no mammals to shoot. I did however see lots of various birds. Tweety bird soup would have been very welcome had I been forced to stay out longer than I had. Plus I was shaking so badly from the cold, despite the fire, that I doubt I could have hit anything with a rifle. So a survival pack that one can easily carry or stow in the car is essential to have in my opinion. So that is my story. I'm sure there are flaws in my plan but yours needs to be designed to the area that you live in. I live in Arizona now and conditions are different. But much of the pack would remain the same. And even after all of these years I still swear by the small gauge shotgun.
     
  2. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Good post & good advice TT.
    Keith.
     
  3. thetoad45

    thetoad45 New Member
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    Thank you... I always seem to have learned the hard way.. :) Tragedy of youth I guess.
     
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  4. nmFreeWheeler

    nmFreeWheeler Expert Member
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    Absolutely. I live in the Albuquerque area of New Mexico and it pains me whenever I see a young couple or family going up into the arid mountains carrying only a 16oz bottle of water and the women wearing short-shorts.
    EVERY PACK should have the 6 necessary components of:
    Shelter
    Fire
    Water
    Food
    Signaling
    Navigation
     
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  5. Mr Boots

    Mr Boots Expert Member
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    I would add knife and first aid kit
     
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  6. thetoad45

    thetoad45 New Member
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    Yep. Trouble always finds one when we are least prepared. Now I try and check for cell coverage also. With the snake factor I'd hate to step on a Mohave and have to try and walk very far (Or in my case hobble along) for help. I wear good boots but one never knows when a snake might bite above them. My eyes are not what they used to be.
     
  7. HappyJackSlade

    HappyJackSlade Well-Known Member
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    Great read. Cheers for the advice
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    other than going to the office or on a shopping trip(and maybe even then) it is wise to have a "get home bag" with you.
    and especially in the woods.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2016
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  9. HappyJackSlade

    HappyJackSlade Well-Known Member
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    I have one in the ute at all times. I also tend to keep a large amount of good quality plastic and stainless cable ties in my large toolbox on the back of the ute among other things. I have quickly put together some long term shelters using the ties and then gone around after with cordage to keep it together. But the ties are awesome and will get the job done fast. Lol but where I live is pretty remote, and you'd have to be pretty unlucky for things to go bad for you out hear. But it's still good to be prepared
     
  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I carry an emergency bag in the car at all times, something that is light to carry and I can just pick up and walk out of where ever I am if the car isn't an option.
    just the bare minimum but will sustain life until I can get back home.
     
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  11. HappyJackSlade

    HappyJackSlade Well-Known Member
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    I also carry a smaller bag. One portable gas burner, just one of those small burners, some packets of powdered soup, X1 army water bottle with a metal cup to go with it and a first aid kit , just a small one. Emergency Mylar blankets and a couple of packs of tampons with a couple of magnesium steels and a knife. This is pretty light.
     
  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    in my bag is: 2 foil blankets, 2 disposable lighters, flashlight with batteries, 1 lock knife, 1 Sawyer mini water filter, 1 spark striker, 2 light sticks, 1 dust mask, 1 mini sharpening stone, 1 water canteen,+ in the car is: first aid kit, 1 shelter/basha, compass, folding saw and maps. normally we are within an 8 mile radius so we just carry a few trail mix bars, if we're going further I carry a separate bag with a weeks worth of dehydrated food packs in it.
     
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  13. HappyJackSlade

    HappyJackSlade Well-Known Member
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    In the car I keep a gps epirb. A number of strobe beacons but this is mainly for emergencies. I've broken down on a large station when I was 19. Took them 3 days to find me. Made me realise how easily you can perish in the outdoors. Have come a long way since then. I've added water tanks under my ute in total 150 litres. I add fresh water every time I use to head out bush. I keep what ever I need in there landcruiser ute. I fitted a 950kg swivel hoist and put a 1.4 tonne electric wynch on it. I had a brilliant camper trailer setup with all I needed, but had to sell it when I moved to Tassy
     
  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    about 40 years ago as a new driver I once ran out of petrol, since then and long before I heard the term "prepper" or even "Survivalist" I have always topped up my tank when it reached half- sometimes even before, you'd be surprised how many people even in the British countryside don't refill until the needle hits empty!!!
     
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  15. HappyJackSlade

    HappyJackSlade Well-Known Member
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    I never let my tanks get to empty. I spend allot of time cutting wood to heat my home.
    Even if my I use a quarter of a tank, it's refilled. It gets really cold here at night so if I get bogged be got 2 full tanks of fuel where as I can run my heater to keep me warm. I get great mileage with my diesel ute
     
  16. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    i'm not too bothered about mileage, I don't expect to be going far post SHTF and will be staying close to home.
     
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  17. HappyJackSlade

    HappyJackSlade Well-Known Member
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    I use to travel long distances so the fuel tanks were a bonus for me. My town is not too big so as you, I'll not be needing to travel too far. There are too many unknowns on the road.
     
  18. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    i live on the extreme edge of a rural market town, small population, surrounded by fields of sheep and cattle, very remote but not isolated.
     
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  19. HappyJackSlade

    HappyJackSlade Well-Known Member
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    South west coast of Tassy. About 600 population .
     
  20. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    smallest town in Devon( my county), population around 2,000 but that is a Parish total including some small hamlets and villages in the area.
    origins date back to 981AD.
     
  21. sarky

    sarky Expert Member
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    I always keep a knife, whistle, compass, light and fire starting device around my neck when I enter the woods. I also keep a slightly larger survival kit in my cargo pocket or on my belt along with a 4-6 inch fixed bladed knife. While not the be all end all like my E & E is, it is enough to see me thru a night or two in the bush
     
  22. LilSoldierGirl

    LilSoldierGirl Well-Known Member
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    Could you not use your upturned canoe as a shelter?
     
  23. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    That would work well for a shelter the cross bars on some would be a pain in the back and might be a little small for some but would work if needed
     
  24. sarky

    sarky Expert Member
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    What i have done is use my canoe as a wall to build my lean-to on.
     
  25. shadyjff1

    shadyjff1 Active Member
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    I was out with the wife and another couple on the motorcycle on a trip through the prairies. Flat and no cover. 2 storms came together over top of us and we had no place to get out of it.

    When I packed the bike I put in a backpacking tarp in the trunk. [Along with other survival gear] My wife told me I was crazy and what was I going to do with that?

    We could not see where we were going so we had to stop before we got hit by a car or truck. Good thing I had the tarp. I put it between the bikes for shelter and we waited for the raid to slow down and got going.

    I don’t know what it would have been like to stand out in the rain for over an hour, but the wife does not ask why I pack that stuff for anymore.
     
  26. Skot

    Skot Expert Member
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    Years ago i ran out of fuel about 30kms out of town, returning home from the river where i had been fishing. It was quite late, i had a mobile phone at the time but the battery had died shortly before i packed up for the drive home. So i had to walk the remainder of the trip home in pitch black darkness, took me all night. I did not see any traffic until i reached the outskirts of town in the morning. Ever since then i have carried an old military style backpack with me containing enough gear to get me home or to manufacture a shelter for the night if need be. I do alot of offroading and wouldnt like to be stuck in the mountains unprepared. I wouldnt much enjoy a 50 or 100km walk back to civilization, but atleast this way i know i would get home
     
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