The Modern Firearm In Survival.

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Keith H., Jun 16, 2016.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    [​IMG]

    Given the difficulty in repairing the modern firearm by the average person, & given the extra weight of brass shells & cartridges & the need for primers & reloading equipment, how suitable do you think the modern firearms is for use in a survival environment where you have to use this tool for hunting & defence? Can it be considered a sustainable option?
    Keith.
     
  2. glreese

    glreese Member
      18/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I think that it depends on the firearm as well as the individual situation. The firearm has many pros and cons, however I would definitely choose it over a knife or probably even over a bow. While it is heavy, and you have to have ammunition, it is generally very accurate, and if not, it is somewhat easy to aim. In all of my experience, guns have been very reliable. I think it is the best tool for hunting. I've never had to use one for defense, but I'm confident if I had to, it would do it's job.
     
  3. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
      330/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Waterproof multi rounds easy to clean and maintain highly accurate at long distance the modern firearm is by far better than the muzzleloader in many ways is a far better choice for survival
     
  4. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
      130/140

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Not reliable on the long term unless you have someone able to craft ammunition and repair jammed weaponry. But also you need smelting skills, metallurgy work in general, mining metal or scrapping them from junk. Therefore, I think even with the knowledge, the options out there are still limited to keep modern firearms in a sustainable manner. There is a lot of conditions to meet you see.
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  5. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    I agree Endure, unless you carry a large supply of ammunition, I fail to see how a modern firearm can be considered a sustainable option for hunting & self-defence. Even then, if you are not able to repair any malfunction, you can still be left holding a goat stake & a club.
    Keith.
     
  6. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
      330/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Modern firearm in 22 cal and 500 rounds well under ten lbs to carry muzzleloader and 500balls powder for load powder for pan patches lube. Powder measure starter ram flints or caps. Weigh how much ?
     
  7. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    If you think you are so right, why are you avoiding answering the question instead of your usual bullshit of trying to rubbish the muzzle-loader? Look at the original post, where do I mention a muzzle-loader? I don't, but seeing as you have, weight is not the only consideration here, & again as I said, I do NOT consider the modern firearm a good sustainable option for long term wilderness living if it is going to be used for hunting & defence.
    Perhaps as you seem to consider yourself an expert on the use of the Flintlock, perhaps you could tell us just how long you have been using one for hunting? Where did you get the 500 balls figure from? I don't need that many. You will with a .22, but I don't. Where did you get the priming powder from? I don't need priming powder. Patch lube? What patch lube, I don't use patches or patch material. Short starter? I don't use one or need one. You have no idea what you are talking about, so how about you stick to what you know & cut the bullshit.
    from now on I will be ignoring your posts. If I could add you to my ignore list I would, but somehow you got to be a Moderator so I can't!
    Keith.
     
  8. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
      330/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Ivebeen useing firearms all my life includeing muzzleioaders of which i own 3 a flintlock a cap lock and a inline i own 114 firearms in total your old 300year old smoothbore in 20g is a fine old firearm the slugs you use are heavy .680 slug no patch your ram that in unlubed is very hard to do after fireing a few rounds would be every hard harder without a ball starter i know guns well keith i got a ruger semi auto 22lr and a brick of 500rds i will take to the range any day and shoot that 500 rounds with no trouble and the eeapon will do it again rught after we finish with a brush there it and a little oil fire yours 500 times with no misfires no problems and i would be very impressed you can make gun powdered so can i but we know what to use how to mix it you live in the past i live in the year 2016 when the shtf i will have those 3muzzleloaders here and they will be used as needed but im reaching first for the m14. And stsnd a far better chance of holding my place than you ever will and yes i will bury you with my knowledge of firearms and their care and maintance of them your gun needs to be put in a honored place and used only if needed its dirty unrealsble has limited distance and not the best choice for survival
     
  9. James98

    James98 Well-Known Member
      80/115

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I have not used both types of firearms so my opinion may be slightly bias however i do believe that a modern brass cased rifle is far superior to any other older style rifles and here is why.
    A modern rifle is more accurate to farther distances which means that if you are not as practiced in hunting as you would want to be going into SHTF you have a better chance of a successful hunt. in addition to this, they reload faster which could be an advantage if you are hunting larger game and want to take two shots so you do not have to track it as far if the first one was not right on target.
    I would say that as far as longevity of the rifle is concerned if you buy a good quality rifle of any category and treat it right it should be a multi-generational tool
    as far as the complications with reloading a modern firearm, There are many inexpensive tools on the market that are capable of reloading without too much difficulty and if you were to have a traditional rifle you would still have to keep reloading supplies such as powder and bullets. I would say that the easiest way would be to stock up on rifle ammunition
    in north America you should be able to find an SKS for around $300 and I just checked you can get 1500 rounds for $350 which should be enough to keep food on the table for a very long time
    If you are concerned about the rifle breaking then buy 2 for that price I feel that it is an investment that will not depreciate ( so you could sell it in the future if you want) and that would be able to keep you safe and fed.
     
  10. Brett Eden

    Brett Eden New Member
      3/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Have you tried an AR?
     
  11. Brett Eden

    Brett Eden New Member
      3/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    They arent heavy, and not to bulky.
     
  12. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
      272/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I mean no disrespect but that statement makes no sense at all to me.
    Repair? I've had modern firearms for over SIXTY years.
    I was a competitive combat handgun shooter. I NEVER had a firearm break nor have I ever seen
    one break.
    I KNOW one man that owned a Competition T.B. Trap 870 Remington that he fired 1,000,000
    (ONE MILLION) trap loads with and ZERO breakage.
    I shot 1,000 rounds per week from a tuned M-14 Smith without a fail to function.
    Gun writer Skeet Skelton fire 100,000 rounds from a gov't 1911 .45 a.c.p. with out a breakage
    without cleaning it.
    To each his own.
    Uninformed opinions are like the anal orifice. Everyone had one.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2017
  13. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
      272/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    YES it is.
    I wish I had that rifle in your picture!
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    Your comment is based on your personal experience jeager, my comment is based on my personal experience.
    Keith.
     
    jeager likes this.
  15. James98

    James98 Well-Known Member
      80/115

    Blog Posts:
    0
    It is important to specify what is meant by a modern firearm. there is a big difference between muzzle loaders, bolt action, and semi/fully automatic firearms. there are advantages and disadvantages to every firearm depending on the situation. There are some similarities that all firearms have that are used in this feed to promote one type over the other and I think that these have no value. The first being that you need to fix and maintain modern firearms but not muzzleloaders and the second being that with modern firearms you need to have stockpiled ammunition. With any firearm you are required to stockpile in order to be able to use it long term. With any firearm you require a projectile and an accelerant. Both of which require tools to make and materials that are not regularly available in the natural environment. And the second argument is that it is hard to fix modern firearms. Any firearm can break and can require use of tools and parts to fix them regardless of the type. Having said this there are some firearms that are more prone to failure and that require more tools and parts to fix. For this reason I would put both muzzle loaders and bolt action rifles in the same easy to fix category and any fully/semi automatic rifle in a more difficult to fix category. This is for the simple reason that the more moving parts the more likely to fail and the harder to fix.

    As far as ammunition stockpiling is concerned the amount of ammunition required to hunt and survive off of is less than I think a lot of people anticipate. Assuming that it take 5 shots per animal which is a lot, and then that you need 5 animals per year per person, if you were anticipating a 10 year collapse which for any developed country would be very unlikely you are looking at about 200 rounds per person which for someone serious about prepping is not a lot.


    Now assuming that muzzle loaders are in the older technology category and all other firearms are lumped as modern firearms I will share my opinion.

    If I had to choose one firearm to take to the woods in a long term survival situation I would choose a high power bolt action rifle and here is why. As far as defence goes it would be devastating to anyone it hit. It also would typically have a slightly farther range than other action types giving me an advantage if I saw the threat coming from farther away. Also bolt action is irrefutably the most accurate rifle meaning less skill is required for hunting. And they have very few moving parts and so are not likely to have any failures that would cause the firearm to become inoperable meaning that as far as reliability is concerned they would be about as reliable as any firearm can get.

    Another advantage of modern firearms is that they are more weather resistant that most muzzleloaders.

    Now if I were worried about other people and defending myself I may choose a semi automatic rifle because they are able to send more ammunition down range faster than any other civilian firearm is able to and so I would feel more comfortable knowing that the weapon is ready to go in case a follow up shot is required. In the case of using it for personal protection you would go through ammunition fairly quickly in fights but you would only be engaging in fights with firearms while other people still have ammunition meaning that you don't need an endless amount you just need more than the other person has which in most cases isnt much more than a few boxes. At the end of the day if you have a dozen well armed people working together to take you down you really don't have much of a chance regardless of that you have.


    And finally while it is important to eventually get to the what if i have to live in the woods forever type prepping for some it is important to worry about the more likely situations first which generally would not last more than a few months and I think that in those short term SHTF situations it is important to have a variety of modern firearms to get you through. And so in long term situations you would still have those modern weapons anyways and I think that more ammunition for the guns that you do have is more important than more guns because there will always be a day for any gun that it becomes a paperweight if you can not feed it.
    and if weight is an issue because you are carrying it in a long term bug out bag you have bigger problems than running out of ammuntion or lightening your firearm
     
  16. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
      272/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Our personal experience is all we have.
    However we learn from others. YOU included. :>)
    Ergo why I'm here.
     
  17. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    I am more concerned with feeding myself than the possibility of getting into a fire fight. My muzzle-loader ammo will last longer than your breech-loading ammo.
    Keith.
     
  18. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Let me speak of one caliber I stock: I've got .303 Brit ammo from the 1950s. This stuff has mercuric primers. when I shoot this stuff, I do get some split necks on the brass, but the deed is done and the accuracy is sufficient for a survival situation or three. Mercury fumes break down brass over the decades but the #### goes BANG.

    Got some of the "good stuff" in .303 Brit. -- Greek ammo headed for Hong Kong and the Gurkha troops stationed there. Lacquered primers, annealed necks, non-mercuric primers, ... -- this ammo is brilliant, though it "fell off a truck" decades ago. And this lot will last decades into the future.

    I routinely fire 30+ yr old .22 lr.

    Smokeless powder is very, very stable. Keep black powder dry and cool and it too will keep.

    If things go sideways where I live, I'll have many folk about who are much like me, civilized & won't panic. However, Oh boy!, but there sure are some monsters about these environs, plus there are sure to be huge crews of interlopers from urban areas 100 to 200 miles away. These monsters will form packs, 100% likelihood. Therefore I and those like me need repeating weapons. I've identified people who I will support should they go low in ammo ... to include the cops. I'll not stand by and watch the police / sheriff's deputies get overwhelmed -- where I live, the cops are sewed on straight, they are not from urban areas, they are pro-civilian rights, pro-Constitution, i.e. mostly good folk, and I'm not going to let them get killed.
     
    Klkak likes this.
  19. jeager

    jeager Master Survivalist
      272/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I'm rather fortunate I think in that I don't intend to bug out.
    As I've mentioned I live in crowed Ohio but in a somewhat secluded niche on 15 acres with
    only one close neighbor.
    That neighbor will come over to the sane side with me if a shtf situation happens.
    I'll help them so they can help me.
    I have 15 acres, 14 woods, and a safe wood burning stove.
    3 chain saws, gas, oil, chains, etc, and if I run out of gas then I have a BIG crosscut saw.
    I keep 25 gallons of stabilized gad.
    I have easily scrounged enough downed dead wood to last weeks.
    I have a large outdoor barrel type steel wood fired cooker/smoker.
    Still I'm an army of but one and can be overcome by gobblins.
    But it won't be easy for them.
    How many really want to die?
    I think they'd move on to those less prepared than loose a bunch of their numbers
    to a crazy man with loaded guns.
    LOTS of loaded guns. Like 50.
    :D:D
     
    lalakai and Morgan101 like this.
  20. Hick Industries

    Hick Industries Well-Known Member
      67/115

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Yes, in my experience a modern semi auto rifle, is the only sustainable option.

    Steel Traps and fishing rods, are good for making meat..
    A recurve bow is good for hunting in my area, less great for defense.
    A black powder muzzle loader is a marginal hunting weapon, loud enough to attract atention, and very poor defensive weapon.
    So once you ask about both hunting and defense, I quickly focus on a modern cartridge rifle.

    Still leaves you with lots of options.
    I reload both smokeless and black powder cartridges. A rifle chambered in 30-30, 44 mag, and 45-70 are certainly worth considering because they can be loaded with cast lead bullets, smokeless or black powder.

    I hunt with single shot, lever action, bolt action, and semi auto rifles.
    They all work great for large and small game.
    But the semi auto wins easily for defense against multiple threats,
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 13, 2019
    Morgan101 and TMT Tactical like this.
  21. Ystranc

    Ystranc Master Survivalist
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    How many reliable shots do you get off each Flint Keith? I was talking to a guy who shoots muzzle loaders and he says it can be a little variable. Where I am Flint is quite rare and awkward to get hold of. Buying ready made flints works out at around £1.25 each for a good quality ready knapped flint. (I picked up a couple to use with my fire steel)
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  22. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
      330/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    There's no logical reason t believe that is true.

    A modern gun will be far more accurate and efficient than any muzzle loader.
     
    Radar and TMT Tactical like this.
  23. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Master Survivalist
      377/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    It is possible that he can make his own black powder and cast his own bullets. If that is true, then he may be correct.
     
  24. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    To go back to the original post the question I would ask is how long do you consider sustainable? I have multiple firearms, and a substantial amount of ammo for each. I own many different calibers, and some of the calibers are duplicated i.e. several guns all the same caliber. If one gun is damaged I may have another of the same caliber, or I can get another one. I don't expect to be in a real fire fight where several hundred rounds are fired.

    All of my firearms are good, quality, well manufactured, highly reliable. Some I have put thousands of rounds through, and I would expect the same reliability from the others. IMHO my firearms will last a lot longer than I will. They will not last forever, but that would be a true TEOTWAWKI situation.
     
    Dalewick, lalakai and TMT Tactical like this.
  25. Snyper

    Snyper Master Survivalist
      330/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    People using modern firearms can do that too.
    Black powder was used in many "modern firearms" up until around 1900.

    There are also powder substitutes that can be made from simple ingredients like sugar and saltpeter along with iron oxide.

    It's no easier to make Black Powder than it is to stock smokeless powder or loaded ammo.

    People are still shooting surplus military ammo from WWII.
    Sometimes they are firing it in guns made at that time also.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  26. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I think it all has to be put into perspective. Can modern smokeless gun powder be made at home--- NO---. Can the average person make black powder --- NO. It takes certain skills, knowledge and components to make Black powder. Will smokeless powder last, --- YES, if stored properly. Will modern ammo last --- Yes again if stored properly. So it really breaks down to what do you want to do. Store ammo, smokeless powder or store black powder components. As for durability of modern firearms, as good or better than the black powder replicas. Both types of firearms will require components not sitting at the local hardware store. You will need to stock these components.
     
    Radar and lalakai like this.
  27. lalakai

    lalakai Well-Known Member
      97/115

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Perhaps the choice might be considered in the same fashion regarding bugging out or staying at home. Each action requires distinctly different approaches and results. At home where I don't have to worry about lugging ammo, repair kit/parts, it makes sense to look at the more powerful options regarding firearms. If I'm bugging out the only long gun I will take will either be a breakdown .22, or the combo .22/410 (pistols are always part of the equation). In either situation, an armed confrontation would only happen because I failed to avoid it.

    Do modern firearms have a place in my plans....yes.....selectively. But I'm not going to depend on them for food; attracts too much attention to what you have and where you are. IMHO
     
  28. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
      455/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    44765808_1969815809707752_6636309902132248576_n.jpg Interesting post Keith. Why the all or nothing though? Even Lewis and Clark took along a air rifle on there historical mission of discovery. Why should anyone interested in survival limit the tools at their disposal. Personally, I'm purchasing the parts I need for a genuine Hawkin rifle build, but if TEOTWAWKI hit tomorrow I wouldn't throw away my modern firearms. How many deer have been killed in this country with a simple 22LR? I have a Savage Mark II with a scope and suppressor that shooting subsonic rounds can't be heard more than 10 feet away and it is accurate and will kill game (turkey's at least) at 100 yards. Why give up such a tool? I'm not looking for an argument. I just want to understand your stance that muzzleloaders or primitive weapons are the only tools for a survival situation.

    PS. I also have an atlatl and darts that I practice with and love to flintknap (Not very good yet. LOL) Pic of my work.

    Dale
     
  29. GrizzlyetteAdams

    GrizzlyetteAdams Crap Creek Survivor
      390/460

    Blog Posts:
    3
    Flintknapper and atlatl fan here, too! I will gladly fling my atlatl long after my last bullet has been shot...

    Beautiful job, Dale.


    .
     
  30. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    I never said it was all or nothing Dale, I have modern firearms too, but if I were on my own & I can only carry one longarm & one pistol, then I choose the flintlock. I am not out to wage a war, I would try to keep a low profile if I have to leave my home in the forest. My family members will be carrying the modern firearms, bows & the rest of the muzzleloading guns.
    Keith.
     
  31. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
      455/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Thank you GA! Dale
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  32. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
      455/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Keith, Thank you for your response. I had gotten a little confused I think while reading everyone's responses on what you were saying. I believe I have it now. Carry what your the most comfortable with and understand your choices but always have backups. Or, at least that what I came away with. LOL!
    Thanks again,

    Dale
     
    Morgan101 and TMT Tactical like this.
  33. Sourdough

    Sourdough "eleutheromaniac"
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I think AR-Platform firearms a fairly ugly, but I like that they can be field stripped and reassembled with no tools, and a entire spare bolt assembly can be stored in the grip.
     
    Dalewick likes this.
  34. CountryGuy

    CountryGuy Master Survivalist
      280/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I admit I don't have a flintlock and probably never will. It's my understanding they are pretty finicky, is that truth or myth? I've heard issues of things like getting the flint set just right, having the right powder in the flash pan, right powder in the barrel etc... and then if it gets damp it effectively becomes a club until it dries out or you unload it. Correct or not? And am I correct in that the only way to "unload" it it to fire it or you have to pull the ball off the top of a black powder charge that didn't light off? Now that has to be an experience. And as to longevity at some point a person will run out of powders too, correct? I know they can be made, and I've seen videos and read some on it and as I recall you need pretty specific ingredient sources when making it correct? Like ash from a preferred type of willow?

    Now an inline could be fun but goes against the old timey roots of the post since it uses mass produced bullets, powder charges and primers.

    With "modern" cartridges there are shells well on 100 years old that are still very viable and ready to go and the ammo from those days doesn't compare to the non-corrosive ammo we have today. So until you run out of loaded stuff or components to reload shells I think the cartridge route makes most sense.
     
    Morgan101, Dalewick and TMT Tactical like this.
  35. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
      385/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    there's something about a firearm you can load on Sunday and shoot all week.
     
  36. Sourdough

    Sourdough "eleutheromaniac"
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Right now you can purchase 1,000 rounds of 5.56 ammo for $249.00
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  37. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
      385/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    sounds like a great deal
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  38. Sourdough

    Sourdough "eleutheromaniac"
      485/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Cheaper then .22 Magnum ammo.

    Would be a good investment.
     
    TMT Tactical and randyt like this.
  39. CountryGuy

    CountryGuy Master Survivalist
      280/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Wow, is that for brass or steel case?
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  40. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    2
    One thing that I have learned here is that when you say survival it doesn't mean the same thing to everyone. Each of us looks at what we as individuals CAN bring to the table and then with that, based on our plans and expectations, we try to come up with the best gear for us. I don't find it at all odd that we come up with vastly different plans and ideas.

    Where Kieth lives, a lot of the guns that many of us have and like are just NOT available in legal form. His plan does not include going on a militaristic march where he will be fighting constantly. He is secluded enough that it is unlikely that he is going to have to repel attacks from thugs. He has developed a way that he is good with. I have no doubt that if he needs more firepower that he can go out and find someone that will "donate" a modern firearm to him.

    I live where guns are just a part of life. Everybody has guns and the so-called assault rifles are as common as ticks on a boar hog. Those are what most of the people that I know use to kill hogs. A 5.56 will kill them but not immediately so they will run off and die someplace else and you don't have to deal with the body. Hog hunting is a family affair and you take the wife and kids out for a day shooting. Needless to say, my situation is very different from Keith's.

    It seems to me that a lot of people are planning on a military sort of situation. The military needs a lot of firepowers because they have objectives that they have to achieve despite resistance from armed enemies. I plan on NOT spending a minute more being shot at that I can avoid. I have no plan to assault anyone. On the other hand, I'm not going into the woods and make like Daniel Boone either.

    Some of us have more defensive plans. Since I can't see more than 75 yards in any direction from my home I like the shotgun a lot. If I need to tend to someone at a distance I have a 30 caliber deer rifle with a scope for that. But all that is based on where I live and what my skill set is.

    I like weapons. I have more guns than I can remember. They are in every room. I also have three Bows and am thinking about a crossbow. If it has a sharp edge or a point on it I probably have several of them swords battle axes machetes, spears I love weapons. I have a machine shop and used to be a gunsmith. I have a forge and make knives. This winter I am going to build a Hawken Rifle I found an untouched older kit for making it and am going to work on that this winter.

    Each person has to find their way. I honestly believe that the old biblical thing about if you live by the sword you will die by the sword is true. A lot of fools are going to but themselves and assault rifle with a big old magazine and be sure that they are 7 feet tall armor-plated and invincible. Some little mouse that is scared half to death will shoot him with some cheap little gun and survive because he hides and will let others do the fighting. There is a reason why there are a lot more rabbits than there are wolves.
     
  41. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I wont be getting into any firefights, remote and quiet is my plan, I'll have too much to do to go looking for a fight.
     
    randyt and TMT Tactical like this.
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Traditional Vs. Modern Knives Apr 20, 2020
Modernizing The Monitoring Orgs News, Current Events, and Politics Apr 2, 2020
Dominos: Modern Cavalry To The Rescue News, Current Events, and Politics Mar 20, 2020
Usa Starts To Modernize News, Current Events, and Politics Sep 13, 2019
Skills To Survive Without Modern Conveniences – 9 Forgotten Pioneer Skills To Learn General Q&A Nov 21, 2017
The Modern Bell Roll Suggestions and Requests Nov 11, 2017
What Modern Survival Aids Do You Own? Survival Gear Oct 18, 2017
The Flintlock Muzzle-loader Versus The Modern Breach-loader For Long Term Wilderness Living. Guns, Knives, Tools, Etc. Oct 17, 2017
Surviving the modern South Africa. Survival Stories Oct 7, 2016
Modern Cave Dwellers Natural, Temporary, and Permanent Shelter Jul 5, 2016

Share This Page