The Survival Garden: How To Start And What To Prep.

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by DirtDiva, Aug 30, 2021.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
      285/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I picked the last of my gooseberries yesterday and cut up 20 pounds of onions. I have so many onions dehydrated in mylar and buckets I think I will just freeze these. Today suckered and tied tomatoes and canning gooseberries for jam and juice. Picked my first head of cabbage today also.
     
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
  2. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      365/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    What do you use the Okra for? In the UK you tend to only find it in Indian food.

    Lonewolf said "we really dont need a huge garden for survival especially those amongst us with small groups, but what we do need is continuity of supply by successive plantings." spot on and this is where polytunnels give a real boost to UK winter crops and they are cheap enough to buy these days. My lad set up a 3.5m X 2m tunnel in the UK garden and it cost £60/$75. The lads loving 'his' garden, I keep getting pictures of cucumbers, toms and more off him LOL
     
    1. DirtDiva
      Okra is somewhat of a southern US staple liking wet and hot growing seasons. Where I grew up in Louisiana okra was introduced long ago by the slaves and has become part of the local cuisine. It can be pickled, cooked with tomatoes, onions and bacon (with shrimp or crayfish), added to dishes like field peas, battered and deep fried, a main ingredient in Louisiana gumbo and used for thickening the gumbo base, also stuffed and in South Carolina added to a dish called Hoppin John.
      Easily grown and hardy to the hot South.
       
      DirtDiva, Jun 26, 2022
      poltiregist likes this.
  3. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Okra is delicious cut into about 1/2 lengths , battered and fried or added to dishes such as the field peas with okra for seasoning that I just ate about 30 minutes ago .
     
    DirtDiva and TMT Tactical like this.
  4. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Once you get okra started, it will spread. And does it ever spread! Me, I've not grown it, but one friend and my family have. It is a perennial.

    I love it fried. My wife is one of those people who shun it. I is a bit "greasy", but I just love it. Fry it up in cornmeal. It's great and it is nutritious.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
    1. DirtDiva
      Unless you live in a very warm, wet climate, okra is not generally a perennial for most. You will have to grow it again the following year if you want to keep having okra each year. Okra is capable of growing back again if you live in the tropics but that is about it.
       
      DirtDiva, Jun 26, 2022
  5. paul m

    paul m Expert Member
      237/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Perennial vegetables are the way forward. My garden is huge,but my back and knees are not getting younger! 20 years ago I started perennial planting. Jerusalem artichokes,rhubarb,raspberries,blackberries,plums,apples and pears.Hazel,for nuts and bean poles.Then perennial onion,Welsh,and Egyptian,along with chives.I have two perennial kales and perpetual spinach.Then there is the herb/ medicinal garden,full of sorrel,rosemary,several mints,thyme,sage and so many others. There is scorzenera and oca as other root crops. They all just need weeding,thinning and very little water. In between,I always grow spuds ,squash and beans- all of which the seeds can be harvested each year. My rabbits and fowls provide muck for composting, which makes it a robust system,with a lot less work than a conventional garden.
     
    1. DirtDiva
      Your system sounds very similar to mine. Are you using raised beds?
       
      DirtDiva, Jun 26, 2022
      TMT Tactical likes this.
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    well done.
     
    TMT Tactical and DirtDiva like this.
  7. paul m

    paul m Expert Member
      237/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Yes , raised beds for the Annual crops. Straight into the ground for the perennial crops.
     
    DirtDiva and TMT Tactical like this.
  8. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      365/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Sounds good, in many ways its similar to Zucchini/courgette. A 'rustic' French dish is diced courgette/Zucchini lightly fried in butter with peas, diced ham and garlic, that simple and some good bread to mop up the butter/juice and okra would work fine in that dish.
     
  9. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
      285/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    100_7610.JPG


    As summer slips in it is time to start working on medicinal herbs for the coming year. I harvested another basket of broadleaf plantain. This is a wild herb found in most yards along areas where the ground has been disturbed. Along driveways and roads is a good place to start. I have a small patch that grows on my property that I harvest every year. It is a wonderful dried herb that I make skin salves with. If bitten or stung by insects this will immediately take the inflamation/pain/stinging away. I always make some for my grandson who handles bees. Working in the garden we always have bee and bug bites. So this is a yearly must have for us. It is a great salve for any skin irritation though including poison ivy.

    100_7655.JPG
    I pick the leaves early in the morning and wash them thoroughly then lay them out on a towel to dry and completely wilt. You want them completely dry for the next step. Sometimes I let the sit on the back deck in the sun for a day or two.

    100_7668.JPG

    Once the leaves are dry I add them to a quart mason jar and add a good olive oil at room temperature to completely cover the leaves. I then add a lid and allow to sit in a dark cabinet for about 8 to 12 weeks. After that time I run the oil through a colander removing all greenery. The oil will have taken on a rich green color and the oils from the plants infused into the olive oil. I then add a little vitamin E oil and a touch of coconut oil to the mixture. Then I melt a small amount of bees wax and add the the oil mixture and mix well. Once the beeswax hardens again it becomes hard and takes on the consistency of a salveor balm. I place this mixture hot while still in the liquid state into small 1/4 pint mason jars and allow to harden. In the last I also added a small amount of fresh honey for it's healing properties as well.

    So many of the plants in my gardens and properties become health aids and medicines. The mint is dried for mint tea to settle queasy stomachs.

    Elderberries are dried for a hot tea to boost the immune system.

    Blackberries, both fruit and leaves, can be made into a tea to alleviate the symtoms of stomach flus. When my children were little I made blackberry popsicles to alleviate nausea and diarreah for my kids when they had stomach bugs.

    Peach leaves are dried and used hot , either fresh or dried, to make a drawing poultice and are great for drawing out infections or foreign objects such as splinter or thorns. Also great for boils.

    So while all the plants in my gardens may not be edible those that are not edible pretty well have a medicinal property of one sort or another. Especially the flowers which bring in the pollinators but also provide medicinal salves, tinctures or poultices year round.

    In a survival situation knowing which plants to use for what could mean survival when modern medicines are in short supply.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2022
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
    1. TMT Tactical
      Outstanding info for those of us with black thumbs. Please keep these great posts coming.
       
      TMT Tactical, Jun 30, 2022
  10. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    My project for the last two days has been picking and processing sassafras leaves for " file " , to put in gumbo . This year I decided to go more primitive and crush my dried leaves with a wooden " mortar and pestle " instead of using an electric blender . --- I was once told by someone that had attended some sort of survival school that sassafras leaves were supposed to be picked on a certain month when the moon was in the right phase . I don't bother with that so perhaps I am not doing it right according to the survival class instructor , but do know my wife prefers my homemade file over the expensive store bought .
     
    DirtDiva and TMT Tactical like this.
    1. DirtDiva
      I actually have a sassafras tree planted in m y yard for that specific purpose.
       
      DirtDiva, Jun 30, 2022
  11. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
      285/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    This last week has been a busy one in the garden. Picking cabbage, gooseberries, beans, squash, black currants, onions, beets, and carrots.

    100_7731.JPG
    I have started processing onions. Running them through both the dehydrator and freezing some. Gooseberry bushes are loaded and I have spent many an hour tipping and tailing them to get ready for various uses. Gooseberry pie fillings, gooseberry juice to add to iced tea and used as a juice concentrate and gooseberry jam.

    100_7737.JPG

    Gooseberry juice concentrate.


    100_7743.JPG

    Gooseberry Jam.

    I have to be in court tomorrow for jury duty but Saturday I hope to start pcking and canning Louisiana red beans. Then I will pull the row and replant for the 4th of July. Same with cabbage I am picking now to freeze and will replant for the 4th for fall kraut along with a fall planting of carrots also.

    I have tomatoes on the vine now as well as picking yellow summer squash. Winter squash are putting on small ones as well as watermelon and cantaloupe. Cucumbers are also on the vine now. Okra coming along nicely. We got about 1.5 inches of rain earlier in the week and the temperatures are mellowing out and cooling a bit. More rain predicted for Sunday. Sweet potatoes are everywhere and growing to beat the band in the summer heat. We have managed to pretty well keep everything watered with our rain barrels so far.

    I see a few Japanese beetles around but far fewer than we have had in years past. Blueberries and peaches are absolutely hanging in the gardens right now as are grapes. If they ripen on schedule it should be bumper crops in July. trying not to count my chickens before they hatch though. I also see a couple of the first ripe blackberries of the year ripening on the south fence line. A dozen ducks due to hatch Sunday. Elderberry blossoms are dropping and the fruit is thick.

    Consistently vigilant, thankful and busy. Hoping you all are equally blessed.
     
    poltiregist and TMT Tactical like this.
    1. TMT Tactical
      If I was anymore green with envy, I would look like a bush. Great going DD. keep the post coming, it provides hope and inspiration for us beginners.
       
      TMT Tactical, Jun 30, 2022
  12. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Interesting that you are using the leaves. I looked it up and sure enough, the leaves are edible.

    I'd dig it for my paternal grandmother who made tea with its roots. Very popular thing to do. Here in Southern Appalachia, it grows wild and there's lot's of it.

    Some are now saying that it is toxic. I find this very difficult to believe due to its being consumed so often.

    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/sassafras-tea-benefits#what-it-is

    "The use of sassafras has become controversial over the past few decades. That’s because it contains safrole, a compound that has been banned by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) due to its potentially toxic effects (1, 2).

    "Manufacturers have started removing safrole during processing, and you can now purchase sassafras root bark without safrole at many health stores and herb suppliers in dry or powder form.

    "According to the National Toxicology Program’s Report on Carcinogens, multiple studies in mice show that safrole may induce liver cancer and tumor growth (10Trusted Source).

    "Although research in humans is lacking, the organization has classified safrole as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen” based on the results of these animal studies (10Trusted Source).

    "Also, isosafrole, a compound synthesized from safrole, is used in the production of illegal drugs like MDMA, commonly known as ecstasy or molly (11Trusted Source).

    "For this reason, products containing sassafras are highly regulated by the government, and many manufacturers remove safrole during processing to avoid trade restrictions."

    ----------------------------------------

    I call B.S. on the above. How much of this herbal tea would you have to drink!

    Saccharine causes bladder tumors in mice. For a human to get to the toxicity levels used in the studies using mice, you would have to consume 57 packs of saccharine sweetener per day. Gimme a break!!!! I perpetually use saccharine. If saccharine were toxic, people with diabetes would be dropping like flies.

    Shoot, Broccoli is toxic, if you want to get picky:

    https://www.thinkingnutrition.com.au/broccoli-bad-for-you/

    "To start with, broccoli is a well-described goitrogen. Goitrogens are chemicals that suppress the function of the thyroid gland by interfering with iodine uptake, a key mineral needed to make thyroid hormone. This blocking of iodine uptake causes the thyroid gland to enlarge; a goitre is the end result.

    "And it is not just goitrogens you need to be worrying about. Broccoli is loaded with formaldehyde, a natural by-product of oxidation and which is known to cause cancer in rats. Formaldehyde is used in the manufacturing of plastics, foam insulation, fungicides, mirrors, insecticides, petroleum, resins and industrial chemicals. No one in their right mind would eat any of these things so when you see this list, just add broccoli to it as well.

    "But the biggest thing you need to know about is what I like to call the ‘dirty little secret’ of the organic food industry. Organic food is good for you right because it doesn’t contain any pesticides? Wrong. Broccoli is overloaded with natural pesticides which are part of the plant’s natural defence system against harm. And what you’re not being told by Big Organic is that half of those pesticides when tested on laboratory animals have been shown to cause cancer.

    "Well at least organic broccoli doesn’t contain any human-made pesticides I hear you say? Sorry, but organic growers are able to use if they wish ‘natural’ pesticides and they are not required to tell you about it. Many of these natural pesticides are actually more toxic than synthetic pesticides. To make things even worse, there is no national monitoring system for these natural pesticides as is the case for the system in place for synthetic ones. Organic broccoli: you may as well be using Round-up for your salad dressing and get your toxic cancer-causing pesticide hit in one go rather than eat it.

    "And remember those thiocyanates I mentioned earlier? Well those too can cause bladder cancer in rats. We have graphic warning signs about cancer on cigarette packets, so why do health authorities continue to sit on their hands and take no action against broccoli?

    "Okay, so back to our normal programming. Broccoli is awesome and is super healthy for you and I rate it (along with other cruciferous vegetables) as one of the best foods you could be eating. It contains a host of nutrients linked to reducing cancer risk. On top of that, it is high in fibre, low in kilojoules and is packed with lots of nutrients such as vitamins C and K, and is a good source of vitamin A, folate and potassium.

    "So, what about all those alarming health concerns I wrote about? Ignore them. Most of them are theoretical as lack any context of dose. Just about anything will cause cancer of the everything in rats if you give it in high enough doses. Although if you have low iodine levels and were at risk of hypothyroidism, you would be wise not to be eating several kilograms of raw broccoli each day."

    --------------------------------------------------

    Hypochondriacs and hand-wringers go out of their way to find things about which to be paranoid.

    Worry about the risks in life and you won't have a life.
    --------------------------------------------------------------

    Enjoy sassafras tea!

    upload_2022-6-30_19-7-33.png
    upload_2022-6-30_19-26-16.png
     
  13. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    A few days ago someone was visiting that had one of those smart phones with an app that could take a picture , scan it and identify the plant . I had them to scan a tree that I was planning to harvest the red berries from to make a spice as I thought it was a spice tree . It turns out , that I was wrong . It was a Carolina black thorn tree whose berries were not something good to eat . I don't remember the effects of eating the berries but do know it wasn't good . Another plant that I suspected might be marijuana turned out to be a medicinal plant called a black snake root plant . --- Personally I don't want a smart phone as I might decide to go to some meeting the government doesn't approve of and I don't want a phone tracking me . However many people have those smart phones so the plant identification app is something they may find useful .
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  14. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
      285/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    07/07/2022

    105 approximate days till average first frost date. Eating mostly fresh out of the garden right now and canning and preserving all leftover. Picking squash, cucumbers, beets, cabbage and beans. No ripe tomatoes yet but plenty of green ones.

    Picked my first patch of Louisiana Red Beans with 3 more patches/plantings yet to harvest. Will plant one last crop for fall. Pulling cabbage and planting a new fall crop earmarked for winter kraut. Picked blueberries today and blackberries.

    Received 1.5 inches of rain yesterday and another 1.5 inches early this moring around day break. When I picked the beans I did notice some bean beetle in the larval stage but also found lots of lady bugs, assassin bugs and praying mantis moving in to control them. No spray needed. Lost some limbs in the fig trees to high wind in the storm yesterday. Was disappointed because they all had immature figs on them. All part of it I guess and this too shall pass.

    Got 7 baby Buff Orphington chicks/pullets to replace my layers which are 3 years old. When these little pullets start laying the older hens will be butchered and put in mason jars with broth. Chicken and dumplins through the winter.

    Also one of the bantum hens hatched out 11 baby ducks. Will raise to butcher the drakes and keep the hens for the flock.

    100_7753.JPG


    100_7768.JPG 100_7776.JPG

    Days are long right now and busy picking, cleaning, snapping, shelling, chopping, freezing and canning. There is something everyday this time of year and very little rest for the wicked. A good life but a busy one.
     
    TMT Tactical and poltiregist like this.
  15. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
      285/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    100_7747.JPG And to go along with those red beans and kraut we spent the weekend making and smoking homemade sausage.

    100_7752.JPG

    And bratwurst patties.
     
    poltiregist and TMT Tactical like this.
  16. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
      365/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    What size pressure canner(s) do you use Diva? I'm starting from scratch and guessing I'll need 25l size?
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  17. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    That pile of green beans made me think about me as a boy on my grandmother's porch. We'd be stringing and snapping beans the better part of an afternoon at a time.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2022
    DirtDiva and TMT Tactical like this.
  18. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I had to put an electric fence around my garden this year as I was having a problem with deer eating the lush greenery they found there . I have been watering it daily as we are in a dry and hot spell . The honey bees told me yesterday that the wild carrots they have been feeding on were playing out by their new behavior of following me around . I put in internal sugar water feeders in my hive and they readily started lapping it up .
     
    TMT Tactical and DirtDiva like this.
  19. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
      515/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    The drought has effected a huge swath of the planet this year . Massive crop failures are being reported . I was wondering how our members were faring with the drought . My garden is doing fine , but only because I water it nearly every day . Right now we are deep into harvesting .
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  20. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    yep, same here, we are eating our own Potatoes, Raspberries, Broad Beans and Tomatoes. watering every day. will be taking a feed off our own Rhubarb soon. Apples are doing well.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  21. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
      285/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    My garden is keeping me busy as well. Picking squash, beans, okra, cucumbers, tomatoes soon, blueberries and peaches. Mr DD is down with pneumonia so I am a solo act right now keeping up with the garden, canning and mowing on my own. No rest for the wicked!
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  22. paul m

    paul m Expert Member
      237/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Broad beans( I think you call them Fava), Borlotti, French and runners. Perpetual spinach, tomatoes,potatoes, kale, chicory, lettuce, and carrots at the moment.

    However, the heat here has not done the garden good. Watering may well be an issue in the future. That’s why I am moving quickly towards perennials. Half the garden is already.
     
    DirtDiva and TMT Tactical like this.
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Survival Gardening For Beginner's Article Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming Feb 9, 2020
3 main vegetables you'll have in a survival garden Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming May 25, 2016
About Your Survival ....not The Product Advertised. News, Current Events, and Politics Apr 6, 2022
Survival Prepping For Normal People. First Time Preppers and Survivalists Oct 5, 2021
Survival Us Army Other Reference Material Apr 28, 2021
Maritime Survival Other Not Listed Situations Apr 17, 2021
" ' New Normal' Survival Kit" News, Current Events, and Politics Apr 3, 2021
Some New Water Survival Equipment Tested Other Not Listed Situations Mar 27, 2021
Tornado Survival Tips For One's Animals Safety Mar 26, 2021
Development Versus Survival News, Current Events, and Politics Mar 17, 2021

Share This Page