The Survival Garden: How To Start And What To Prep.

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by DirtDiva, Aug 30, 2021.

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  1. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    My garden is framed in 2 foot wide rows . I opted to have handy roofing felt " tarpaper ' as it is 3 foot wide and is relatively inexpensive for covering my garden until the radiation dissipates . Today it is selling for $20.00 per roll at my local hardware store . This can also be used to cover doors and such to reduce radioactive dust from entering a home .
     
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  2. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    What's your planned routine for decontamination when entering the home after being outside?
     
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  3. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Actually the plan is when the Nuking starts , I will likely have several hours and perhaps a day before I expect a contaminated cloud would reach hoovering over my alamo and even then most likely will not descend to the ground . That gives me adequate time to prepare my garden in case I do get a radioactive dust settlement . At that point I and my Clan will be sheltered inside our structures for a few weeks . When my Old Civil Defense radiation detector pronounces it safe to venture outside , only then will I go outside . -- That plan is not as adequate as if I had a radioactive shielded bunker to retreat to but regardless , that is my present plan .
     
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  4. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    Getting 'yourself clean' is not always easy even with training, have you stocked up on NBC suits, respirators and spare filters?
     
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  5. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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  6. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    This is ridiculous . This is just trying to be negative and convince yourself that because you would not expect to survive , then everyone else must perish also . However you are not alone in this way of thinking . I know of two more with this same attitude . Reread my above post . When you are not contaminated to begin with , then there is nothing to clean off .
     
  7. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    Not negative at all, I'm realistic about the situation your planning for. I've served and been trained in staying clean, I know how difficult it is for a well equipped, trained team to stay clean so I'm interested in how you intend to stay isolated for a month or maybe two.

    A family staying isolated in a home for weeks is a big task, storing food won't be a problem but your going to need a hell of a lot of water not just for cooking and drinking but for spray downs etc, even sewage, what are you going to do with a months worth of human dung and pee? Air filtration? Power for lighting/comms? When you do go outside do you have enough seeds to start growing and thats if in fact the soil is safe to grow food in? Do you have a stock of food to last the months-a year until you can provide the basics to sustain you and your family? Do you have access to clean running water because your going to need thousands of gallons potentially to kick start your crops.

    Not being negative at all, I'm genuinely interest in your strategy/planning/equipment/stock et al.
     
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  8. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    All is covered . -- I have had years to prepare for this and did . I am not pointing a finger at anyone , but others on this forum also had years to prepare . If they didn't take prepping serious enough to do so , then they will have to accept the consequences . What is not surprising but still annoying , is those facing their bleak future now realizing they didn't properly prepare wanting to lash out at those that did . -- I have said on this forum over and over " if someone isn't preparing for anything no worse than a cat 5 hurricane , then they haven't prepared enough . The thing is I was serious . I see all too often some member trying to convince themselves of something that just isn't realistic . Rather than stirring up the crap pot just normally overlook it . -- I have said before but will repeat " I am very confident in my Tribes ability to survive " .and that includes a Nuclear War . --- I will add however , though I am confident in my preparations will admit I could possibly be wrong on our survivability but even if we do die , I can for certain say it wasn't from lack of trying to survive . We will not just curl up and declare there is no use trying to survive . Neither will I begrudge someone that may have prepped to a higher degree than me .
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2022
  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    even in an non nuclear war event, we will all probably need a minimum of 1 Years food stored, that is until we get in our first harvest, thats from first preparing the beds to the final picking, some people say 18 months depending on what time of year the event happens. growing from seed takes time.
     
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  10. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    That is why my winter garden has already been planted . I will be harvesting spinach in a few days . That bed of spinach will likely still be producing when my next year's summer crops are nearing harvesting . That is why I like experimenting with different plants , so as to hone my survival capabilities . Someone that hasn't got their survival garden planned out as to which crops , when to plant , how they plan to fertilize their garden and a self perpetuating seed supply will be in a bind when SHTF . -- I am already in the survival mode and not just speculating as to " what I would do " . I am sure we have other members already in the survival mode .
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2022
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  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I have been growing a lot but not all of my food for the last 25-30 years, experimenting with different foods and different ways of growing it, from dig/no dig to open garden/container growing, making my own plant feed from natural materials, compost and mulch making+ animal manure collecting.
     
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  12. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Where I grew up there were a lot of years where we never had a freeze and had plants still producing in February. Most peas will produce until a freeze kills them and a lot of beans are pretty hardy too. I had big rolls of plastic and would cover the plants if there was a frost warning.

    Now I mostly grow snack and spices plants. Radishes, carrots, onions, garlic, and several types of peppers. Beans and peas are just dirt cheap at the farmers markets. I think that most people these days don't know what to do with fresh vegitables past a few things like peppers and onions. They are not going to buy peas or beans that they have to shell. I always liked sitting out under the trees shelling peas with the familly.
     
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  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I grow broad beans, the pods have to be shelled like peas, its no big deal.
    most people are too lazy, they buy mashed potato and picked salad leaves in the supermarkets, many dont know apples grow on trees.
     
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  14. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    I will probably put in some peas if things went south. If you will keep them picked here they will just keep putting more on and growing until a freeze kills them. I also like the little red new potatoes and all manner of peppers. The peppers, onions and garlic may not have a lot of nutrition but they will make other things more eatable. Here peas seem to produce better than most beans.

    I would like to have some chickens but they are hard to protect. EVERYTHING likes to eat chickens and hungry people are a big pain in the butt to bury. When you dig down to about two feet you hit a rock hard layer of clay. I would probably take them out in the woods and dump them. If I had hogs they might get part of them too. Hogs like meat.

    I have been a part of butchering all sorts of animals since I was a little sprout. I don’t think and I would have any problem disposing of a thief’s or attacker’s body. If raiders become a problem I will start putting their heads on my fence posts.
     
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  15. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
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    Leaves are starting to fall now and the temperatures are down to 40 at night. Starting to chop leaves and build compost piles no need to waste those valuable resources. No rain to speeak of in about two weeks and was hoping to get a bit from Hurricane Ian. Looks like that is not going to happen. Foraging walnuts right now. Still picking cucumbers, tomatoes, winter squash, figs and blackberries. In the garden cabbage, mustard and spinach. Two weeks away from average first frost date.
     
  16. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    steady rain here today, cold but not freezing, on the good size all this rain is keeping my water butts full up.
     
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  17. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
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    While fall is here the work continues dealing with harvests. Still squirreling away harvests and lookig forward to a winter rest. I am ready! I have started dehydrating any remaining harvests as I make them now.

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    mashed sweet potatoes mixed with a little maple syrup, cinnamon and apple juice. Can be used as a fruit leather but I break into small pieces and eat as a snack or put into oatmeal. Great source of potassium!

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    Dehydrated okra, figs and sweet potato leather. Okra can be ate out of hand because once dehydrated it takes on a really nutty flavor. Sweet potato leather satifies that sweet tooth with maple syrup added. And figs are absolutely addictive dried like this. Once I get finished these will be put into Mylar bags with 02 absorbers for long term storage in buckets with gamma lids.

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    Huge figs this year! One is variety Chicago Hardy and the other variety the really large green one on top is unknown. It was a gift from a friend.

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    Figs are really easy to dehydrate just slice and dry. Figs are a great crop for me as a prepper. Easy to propagate, very few diseases or pests other than birds and a smaller tree and easy to handle.

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    Winter squash coming in now also. I will chunk some of these up and put them in jars with onions and garlic and cover all with chicken broth and pressure can for 75 minutes. This will be used to make soup by opening the jar and adding cream and running the immersion blender through it to puree. The butternut squash stay on the vine to develop a hard outer peeling so that they keep longer in storage. They must be picked before frost though. I probably have another dozen out there. They make great pumpkin type pies for the holidays. Much better than pumpkin.
     
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  18. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    Great post as usual Diva, thanks for posting.

    27c/80f here today but thunder storms predicted for Sunday.
     
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  19. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    "mashed sweet potatoes mixed with a little maple syrup, cinnamon and apple juice" been thinking about that one since I read your post and I'll be giving that a try without a doubt.

    I love dried fruit and mixed nuts for trail snacking, I love figs (not too many or you end up speeding up your pace ;) ), Gorp in the USA, Scroggin eleswhere (certainly Australia and New Zealand) is the perfect hike food for between meals although 'Scroggin' just sounds better IMHO :)

    Diva, every time I read your posts my 2023 TDL gets longer...your a bad influence on me. :cool:
     
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    1. DirtDiva
      o_Oo_Oo_O
       
      DirtDiva, Sep 30, 2022
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  20. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Lucky you! Found two great places to forage walnuts. Trouble is they are right on a curve in the road = danger. One place I found while heading through a farming area up into the mountains to a rifle range. LOTs of walnuts but on a death curve in the road, plus a blind hill, plus zero road shoulder. One place, I was tempted to get out and fill a bag. The other place would have been certain death. People fly along the county roads. A goodly number of the good'ol'boys who live here imagine that they are NASCAR drivers.
     
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    1. DirtDiva
      I always advise people that when you forage out in the forest around here to always wear a hunters orange vest. Deer, boar and bear seasons, both gun and bow and arrow, are ususally sometime around the autumn. Random strangers armed with weapons tromping around the forest with me are of great concern. I have an orange vest and I even have one for my dog. Rather safe than sorry!

      As for country roads I have lived many places in my life both rural and the big city. I find that rural roads are the most dangerous because there is little to no police presence in most rural areas and the local residents tend to speed just because they can get away with it. One of the most deadly car crashes I have ever happened upon was in the absolute middle of nowhere. Car swerved speeding to miss a cow and killed 3 kids.
       
      DirtDiva, Oct 5, 2022
  21. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    This is a good time of the year for Puttin to kick off his Nuke Party " and everyone is invited " . As gardeners or sitting on the bounty of their labor from the past warm months .
     
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  22. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    give it a rest, this nuke stuff is getting boring, nothing any of us can do if the nukes start flying anyway.
    unless someone has an airtight bunker and enough food supply to last 5-10 years then we are all victims.
     
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  23. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    This is amusing . A prepper not wanting the bad stuff reported , just wanting to hear the optimistic " wishing " it into being stuff . Perhaps I am just too scary as I prep for the truly bad stuff .
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2022
  24. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
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    Projects for the day... Grinding pork butt which was on sale locally at the small neighborhood market with local farm fresh meat for $1.49 a pound and butcher on site. Will make homemade breakfast sausage with it for the freezer. Good commercial breakfast sausage runs over $3 a pound so a savings there. Also put a couple pork butt roasts in the freezer for the crockpot and will smoke a couple for seasoning meats in beans and such. Any time in this economy that I can find good local meat for under $2 a pound I take notice.

    Bought 20 pounds of chicken leg quarters also at $0.69 a pound and am making broth to make winter squash soup to can. Both crockpots going with bones for broth. WIll use the chicken meat from the bones and make some chicken casseroles for the freezer for on those days when I am too lazy or busy to cook.

    Okra and figs in the dehydrator already this morning also.

    Treating a duck for bumble foot this morning also. Nothing like early morning surgery. I wear many hats!
     
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  25. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    you reckon? I prep for what I can survive, the collapse of the system, not complete obliteration down to the sub atomic level.
     
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  26. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
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    Average first frost date August 15. Mother nature just snuck in here a week early with temp at daylight of 32 degrees and the gardens covered with frost. Spent yesterday picking all winter squash, okra, figs and blackberries left on the plants.
     
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  27. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    We are still running our ACs in East Texas. A cool front sounds kind of nice right now. We will not quite make it into the 90s today though so I guess that is fall in East texas.
     
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  28. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
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    October 20, 2022

    Well we have had several frosts now in my garden and 3 days of hard freezes very early for this area. I even saw a snow shower chance a couple days ago. It has been a scramble getting everything picked and preserved right here at the end of the season. But busy days keep me out of trouble and off the streets I guess! Lol

    The hickory leaves are a beautiful yellow right now and the fall colors are early. Burn bans and permits are on and off as it is still dry after almost a month of no rain. The recent showers helped though. Mr DD has been collecting his walnut stash and they are dehulled and washed and soon he will start cracking them for the freezer. Have also been collecting persimmons as they ripen and fall. Made a small batch of hickory syrup that Mr. DD uses for BBQ sauce also. We have also been using the fireplace to keep the chill off the house.

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    The last of the winter squash were picked before the frost hit and I have begun processing them to use over the winter.

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    Some were canned in chicken broth to make a squash soup base once opened an immersion blener will be used to cream them and then butter and cream added for a delicious soup during those cold winter days.

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    The seeds are saved and some will go into the freezer for replanting next year and some will be salted and roasted for winter snacks.

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    Okra once dehydrated is stored in recycled commercial jars and lids with oxygen absorbers. Dehydrated okra is a great out of hand snack and can also be thrown into soups and gumbos or rehydrated and fried.

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    Figs dehydrated are also put into commercial jars with oxygen absorbers. A great snack or addition to oatmeal.

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    Fig preserves are a great addition to that hot buttered biscuit on a cold winter morning.

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    Some of my older laying hens had stopped laying from age so I have taken advantage of cooler temps and started butchering and canning the stewing hens. Another great addition to soups, stews, gumbos and casseroles. That rich bone broth they are canned in is so good for you. 100_7945.JPG

    Even though frost has come the compost piles contiue to grow from all the leaves starting to fall. My young Buff Orphington pullets that I bought this spring to replace the old laying hens should start laying soon and are healthy and should meet my egg needs for years to come. The food storage buckets are again full to bursting as are my pantries. The seeds are drying on the old kitchen table and another year down here in my garden.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2022
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  29. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    You can use butternut squash instead of pumpkin to make pumpkin pie. I think they taste pretty much the same. Only cornfield pumpkins (often called "Kentucky" pumpkins) make good pumpkin pie. These are orangish yellow. The deep orange pumpkins don't make as good of a pie.

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    You have your own recipes but here are some recipes for butternut squash pie:

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=butternut+squash+pumpkin+pie

    Too, you can cut a butternut squash and bake it. Don't go easy on the butter. You already have a recipe for this, but here are a couple of other folk's recipes.





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    We also use the dehydration packs when jarring dehydrated veggies.

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    1. DirtDiva
      Actually the canned pumpkin sold in cans is not pumpkin at all but rather a squash variety. I agree with you that butternut makes a much better pie than pumpkin any day!
       
      DirtDiva, Oct 21, 2022
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  30. DirtDiva

    DirtDiva Master Survivalist
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    Amazing Butternut Pie
    2 chilled 9 inch pie shells
    3 cups pureed squash
    2 cups brown sugar firmly packed
    6 large eggs
    1 1/2 cups cream, half&half or evaporated milk(1 can)
    3 teaspoons ground cinnamon
    1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
    1/2 tsp ground ginger
    1/2 tsp salt
    4 Tablespoons all purpose flour
    2 Tablespoons melted butter
    2 tsp. vanilla

    Preheat oven to 350
    With electric mixer beat squash puree with brown sugar
    Add eggs, milk,spices, salt, flour butter, and vanilla.
    Beat until well blended.
    Pour filling into chilled pie crusts and bake on middle oven rack for 40 to 55 minutes, or until set.
    Transfer to rack to cool.
    Serve just warm or at room temperature.
    Yield 2 pies.
     
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    1. Old Geezer
      Thnx 4 recipe! We grow summer squash. I don't think I've ever tried to grow Butternut. I should.
      Wife said she was going to buy a couple of Butternut at grocery. They sell by pound. The clerk said that they'd be over $7. Wife told her, "Not going to pay that!" and set them aside.
      :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:o_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_O
       
      Old Geezer, Oct 21, 2022
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  31. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Actually gardening , raising survival critters , water and having a defendable retreat , there is a huge difference between actually doing it present tense and just talking about doing it . --- Famine , Economic collapse , dying from the governments depopulation shots ,and Nuclear War all call for serious long range prepping . Over the coming months growing food in a reasonable amount will become more crucial .
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2022
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  32. arctic bill

    arctic bill Master Survivalist
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    you are lucky, we had a hard frost last month .
     
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  33. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    My AC is running right now. It is 6:30 pm and is still 79 degrees. This is one of my favorite times of year. Highs about 80 and lows at night in the mid 50s. Everything is still green and growing.
     
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  34. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    Another great post Dive, many thanks... I love figs :)

    28c/82f here at 15:05 which is comfortable enough outdoors.
     
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  35. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    temperatures here around 17C /62F slightly damp but no frost.
     
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  36. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    At this point it looks like I may not plant a spring garden next year . My Grandson asked me a few days ago if he could get married at my garden site " on my birthday " which is next fall . I will likely need to remove my garden frames and plant the site in some type of grass . After the ceremony I could still put in a fall garden of greens . The garden site is on top of a cliff with a spectacular view . Occasionally I watch eagles from my perch and am quite often much higher than they are . I have two benches behind my garden to just sit and watch the sun come up and drink my coffee . If it was a small ceremony I would consider planting my spring garden , but what we are expecting is extremely large .-- It appears I will need to rethink of what I will do with the wood ashes from my wood fueled heater and compost and save it until a later date to put on my garden .
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2022
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  37. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    A reminder of sorts... A lot of the things that people plant in their home gardens now are plants that they get from garden centers rather than start from seeds. These give you a running start and the plants are bred to be great producers. They make for a faster and often better producing garden.

    As with most things there is a but to this though. Hybred plants often don't produce seeds that will give you another similar plant next year. Some have fruit and seeds that don't produce at all. These plants are often also designed to produce a lot of fruit based on fertilized soil, being watered often, not just an occasional rain or sprinkle. You might be a lot better served by heritage plants. They won’t produce the same as the hybrid plants but they are tough and WILL pretty much produce under harsh conditions without daily watering and fertilizers.
     
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  38. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    I'm still an apprentice food grower but recognise the need to have a store of 'natural' seeds as well as the often better yielding hybrids.

    When I eventually finish my home here I'll be Mylar packing seeds for cool storage and freezing... not sure they'll be needed, everybody here grows some sort of food if only tomatoes and peppers.
     
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    1. DirtDiva
      I like to store my seeds in smll mylar bags in a box in the freezer. As some seeds become less available I have increased what I save two fold. In the freezer they seem to last for years.
       
      DirtDiva, Oct 27, 2022
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  39. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Today I picked mustard greens to send about 400 miles away to feed a power line crew , that are sleeping in converted grain silos . Actually looking at pictures of the insides of those grain silos , they are very nice accommodations .
     
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  40. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Not here in S.Appalachia. This little town's elevation is circa 1,300 ft / 400 meters. The mountains around here are not that tall, they run 3,000 to 4,000ft / 900m to 1200m.

    Daytime temps are in the 50s / 60s (circa 15 C ); evening temps are in the 40s (5 deg C ); however, we've had some nighttime temps down into the 30's and have had a couple of frosts already.

    The trees have gone to orange and red fall colors. The colors this year are not spectacular. The colors are a bit dull, we think. What a shame.

    The Appalachian Trail and Blue Ridge Parkway are about 4 miles from us, if you take a road. If you are a hiker and part mountain goat, a much shorter distance. In foggy weather, it is not fun driving up there. The fog (you're in the clouds) is pea soup thick. Your car's headlights help little. Even your truck's fog-lights don't help that much. We had to cross the mountains yesterday and the weather was great, thank goodness. In winter, the mountain pass roads ice-over. The road crews most often do a very good job of keeping people from getting killed up there -- they have to salt the roads over and over ...

    Here's what the fall colors can look like if one has favorable weather conditions:

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?...C2&first=1&cw=1369&ch=794&tsc=ImageHoverTitle


    [​IMG]
     
  41. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Tomorow picking spinach from the garden for a evening meal is the plan . That stuff will survive sub zero temperatures and provide food throughout the winter . That is why I rank it high for a nuclear winter garden crop . Depending on how cold it gets , it might even thrive after the Nuclear War . The coldest temp we have had so for this fall has been 26 degrees . I am actually surprised my mustard greens are still growing well . --- This morning one of my sons joined me at dawn at the back of my garden to sit on my bench , drink coffee and watch the sun come up . An awesome sight and the start of another great day .
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2022
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    1. DirtDiva
      My favorite way of eating spinach is spinach salad and spinach quiche. My spinach and mustard greens continue to grow as well. I love watching the sun rise in my garden and try to spend a little time everyday there. Even if just doing small things like turning a little compost or spending a little time there allows you to watch what is going on and having a cup of tea or coffee and a little visit sounds relaxing. I also have benches, chairs, swings and bird feeders in the garden as well.
       
      DirtDiva, Nov 1, 2022
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  42. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    I'm back working offshore next week after an extended leave so I've downed tools and will spend this week just chilling out in the ham radio shack which as of Friday is 100% off grid !!! :)

    The weather is cooling off now, high yesterday of 23c/73f with a night low of 17c/62f and by the end of the month the ski season starts in the resorts not that far from me. There is snow on the high peaks now.

    Never been happier in all my life, I'm working on an early retirement plan...I just want to be here and grow food ;)
     
    TMT Tactical and DirtDiva like this.
  43. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    off topic comments should be reserved for "the hangout" area.
     
  44. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    You really need to lighten up mate.
     
  45. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    just doing my job. I could have just deleted it as being not relevant to the thread subject. next time I will if thats your attitude.
     
  46. Max rigger

    Max rigger Master Survivalist
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    You just don't like seeing others being happy do you...thats sad
     
  47. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    if you want to post about your life in Spain, thats fine, just start a fresh thread under the sub forum "the hangout", dont put unrelated posts on other threads.
    I'm just trying to keep the threads straight and relevant, that is all.
    #I wish people would read the rules and stick to them..."posting, rule 3"...The Hangout is the only place allowed for non survival topics......Admin rules, not mine.#
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  48. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    To me a survival garden needs to cover two basic things. One is to provide FOOD that has calories. A lot of the favorite and common gaden plants offer very little in the way of calories. A survivl garden needs to be as heavy as possible in calories. The second part of a survival garden needs to be in spices and things to make things not normally a part of your diet taste better. You need garlic, peppers, onions... If you like it you need to raise it. Without this a lot of things are just not going to be all that good and just mostly bland as heck.
     
    TMT Tactical and Old Geezer like this.
  49. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    a traditional British diet can be called bland by some, many people smother their food in spices and sauces, the only thing I put on my food is gravy and brown sauce, I want to taste my food not the spices and peppery sauces.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  50. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Besides the heirloom winter spinach that I have mentioned before , I have now added Heirloom kale seeds to my nuclear winter garden survival plan . Both plants will survive extreme cold . My spinach has survived under snow and the kale is touted to be able to survive 10 below zero temperatures . I don't know if it will come down to a nuclear winter survival situation , but one thing for sure , I will not curl up and declare it is no use trying to survive such adversity . I may die but I will die trying for that one more day of life not only for myself but for my tribe .
     
    DirtDiva and TMT Tactical like this.
    1. DirtDiva
      My husband does not care for kale but my chickens love it so I plant it for the winter chicken treat but in a bind I could eat it.
       
      DirtDiva, Nov 5, 2022
      poltiregist likes this.
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