Things to remember about permanent shelter

Discussion in 'Permanent Shelters' started by Aneye4theshot, Jan 25, 2016.

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  1. Aneye4theshot

    Aneye4theshot Expert Member
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    So you finally got your shelter ready to go. Your design was implemented, you created a great living space that is cozy and now a place you call home again. You are amazed at what all your hard work did but do not think it is over.

    Living in your new shelter is going to take planning, work, and upkeep of the land so that you continue to have what you need and a safe shelter. You will find that if you are trying to blend in, you will want to leave the land undisrupted, so that means keeps things clear, out of sight and part of its surrounding. Even if it’s not a hidden location, the land will still require care, and you will require supplies from that very land.

    You will always want to stay ahead on your wood supply, wet wood will not burn, no wood will burn, and that could mean the difference between dinner and freezing at night. You will need to be aware of the water you are drinking, if it smells funny or looks funny, it’s not safe, you need to find a clean inlet or spring to obtain proper drinking water. If that is not possible you will need to boil your water, a fast way to do this is to heat a stone and stick it your water this will help heat the water to a temp where it burns away impurities.

    You will need to make repairs to your home more often if you did not put time and effort into the build or you may find that something in your design is not working out like you preferred it to. Your new shelter will take time to keep up.

    You will need to make sure that you have safe perimeter, one that provides you with hunting land, seclusion, and supplies. Without the proper elements, you could be putting your life at risk. It takes lots of time and effort. Your entire lifestyle will change, farming, hunting and collecting supplies will be your new jobs but with the right tools, time, and effort one can successful build and live in their survival shelter with minimal issues.
     
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  2. Para173

    Para173 Well-Known Member
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    I've been thinking about this issue for a while. What I've been looking at is a sort of underground shelter using solar and wind turbines for electrical power. The underground shelter would be about 4 feet or so underneath the dirt. The solar panels and wind turbines would provide power to batteries which would supply power to lights and electrical equipment if the power goes down and if the back-up generator also fails. See where I am going here? What I am looking at is a system of redundant back-ups but I really shouldn't need much in the line of a stove or furnace, right? What's your take on my idea?
     
  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    trouble with being underground is that one is at a disadvantage if attacked.
    I would prefer above ground with the advantage of height looking down on any potential attacker.
    the only time I feel underground would be positive is in the case of nuclear attack.
     
  4. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Underground liveing is work but done right can be very good setup. Need to be deeper than 4ft tho and upport roof. Well vc and nva were masters at this they had underground systems that were amazeing
     
  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    I wouldn't live underground in a bunker or a steel container unless it was nuclear armageddon, but I would live in an ancient British roundhouse made of thatch and branches and mud and straw(aka cob).
     
  6. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Home made brinks can be made anywhere lots of unfo on how out there makes a good home. Stones. Take more work but make strong sturdie home
     
  7. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Bricks sorry
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    people used to use what was local to them, in some places this was stone, in others timber, some places in Devon are built of cob- a mixture of mud, clay and straw.
     
  9. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Two walls of our home are stone gathered from farms all farms have a stone pile my septic system i made has passed every local and fed test done to it i made good money putting them in for others very simple but it works
     
  10. hippyzomby

    hippyzomby New Member
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    I like the underground idea so much that is my plans.
    It is cool and if you heat it up it stays warm.
    It can protect you from so much but at the same time makes you vulnerable to water disatsters.
    Underground you can go over as far as you want and have room so much more room.
    Have you seen Blast from the Past.
    He has an amazing underground shelter.
    Good ideas every where.
     
  11. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    I learned underground in vietnam vc and nva had everything they needed underground. From storeage liveing hospitals. Undergroud is away to do this.
     
  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    underground you are at a disadvantage in that you cant see what is going on above you.
     
  13. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
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    Condensation and mould are two major pains with anything underground!
    In hot dry climates they are good but anywhere wet is endless problems!

    I have visited many underground places over the years, most are not really liveable!
    but a few At Cooper Pedy are fantastic 48c outside 23c inside no aircon!
     
  14. Tessa

    Tessa Member
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    Underground isn't even an option here because of the water table being so shallow, we don't even have basements. I honestly don't have any sort of permanent shelter plans, so what would you suggest for a sub-tropical climate? Cold isn't an issue, we only see freezing temperatures every few years and that's only one night at a time. The biggest issue I can see here is shade and protection from heat exhaustion, and that's easy enough to find or make without a permanent structure.
     
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