Tools

Discussion in 'Primitive Tools and Weapons' started by Tom Williams, May 8, 2016.

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  1. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Old tools work. Most times better than the new latest got to have gadget ahatchet axe and bowsaw are iteams that are a must older tools
     
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  2. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    Totally agree Tom, old hand tools are the way to go. Well worth checking out the second hand shops.
    Keith.
     
  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    this is one reason I hit the Sunday markets most weekends, plenty of old tools to be had and sometimes the seller dosent even know what it is or worth!!
     
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  4. poltiregist

    poltiregist Master Survivalist
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    Buyer alert - This only the second time I have seen working two man crosscut saws for sale by Sportsman's Guide . These are Czech Republic military surplus , 43 inch blade saws . The first time I bought several of these saws . I don't know if the saws up for sale today are as good as the ones I bought or if they come from the same source as the ones I bought . Mine had never been used and came packed in military grease . One thing though I doubt these military surplus saws have been used much if ever . You know the military with heavy equipment available to them would not be using these saws under normal circumstances . I don't need any more two man crosscut saws but some of you may . When gasoline is no longer available for whatever reason , such a saw would be priceless . ---- available at Sportsman's Guide , price $40.00 - item number 2090-713222 Sportsman's Guide phone number 1-800-888-3006 catalog number 609192
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2020
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  5. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    I recently took the time and monies to buy two each of sets of taps and dies...and also two sets of thread files...metric and American Standard....

    I now have a set metric and American standard and thread files for the prepper groups up in central Virginia and also a set metric and American Standard and thread file for me as a spare set here at my location.

    I cannot keep count of the number of times over the years I have had messed up bolts and nuts and needed a set of such tools to get me out of a jam...when the stores were not open..

    I have even fabricated my own bolts and nuts in a pinch...threaded rods as well.


    Many of the mobile radio connections or car or truck antennas have a coaxial cable connection which is threaded 3/8 by 24 National Fine threads...for certain antennas. I have made my own antennas out of 3/8 diameter solid hardware store aluminum rods and threaded them myself to 3/8 by 24 National Fine threads...

    You learn/teach yourself how to do this in a pinch...or if you have worked in such fields.

    A good tap and die set can come in very very handy in a pinch....so too a thread file.



    So too a good set of drill bits and drill...along with a very steady hand...and patience.


    The olde timers at work also taught me how to sharpen a standard drill bit on a bench grinder by hand...up to a certain size...about 3/4 inch diameter.

    That knowledge and skill too has come in very very handy when the stores are closed and you are working into the night..

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2020
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  6. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    Old tools are often amazingly inexpensive and will be pricelessly valuable if the power ever goes off. How will you drill a hole without electric drills? Electric grinders are the only grinders that you can buy new now. Most men now can't even sharpen a knife without one of those electric sharpeners.

    for most people these days when the power goes off they will within a year either be dead of living hand to mouth as people did 15,000 years ago. We can't even in most places fall back to animal-powered farming. The animals don't exist and nobody knows how to make harnesses. You can't just throw a rope around a milk cows neck and plow the fields. The old draft oxen are almost extinct and few people how have ever even seen one. Milk cows and meat cattle have about as much to do with them as a poodle does a wolf. They are BIG tall powerful beasts. the only pair that I have ever had anything to do with were as tall and heavily muscled as a draft horse. In the distance, they looked like big horses with horns!

    Tools were what raised man from being the prey to being THE preditor. We will return to that pretty fast is some of us don't have the means to keep some of the old ways alive. Simple things like shovels and hoes were a VAST improvement over pointy sticks for farming. They are almost useless without handles and no, a handle isn't just a stick that you put them on. In order to make one that will last you need to draw knives, draw planes, and the knowledge of how to pick the right wood, season it and then shape it in the right way. I HATE to look at the grain on the crappy handles that you see in hardware stores these days. they are shaped by a machine and look right but if the grain of the wood isn't turned the right way they are nearly useless for hard use. The right kind of wood isn't easy to shape. You need good tools and the means to keep them sharp and to replace even those tools as needed.

    We have lost soooo much and getting it back will take longer than it did to invent the first time. It is a process and you can't start in the middle. You may know what a house looks like but in order to build it you need the many specialized tools. Then you need to know how to make those tools and it just goes on and one. Having a saw won't be much help for long unless you know how to sharpen them. How do you MAKE a saw????

    I have tried to work back as far as possible. Most tools will need to start in a forge and then work up from there. Oh and you can forget your gas forges and where will you get the coal to run the forge. Just burning wood won't get it! I have made a saw. It wasn't pretty and it didn't cut as well and clean as a good modern saw but it would saw wood. It was a lot more trouble and time than you would imagine. Lots of hand filing then bending the teeth to the right pitch so they would throw the chips out of the cut and not bind it up and then you have to get the heat treatment right or it is useless. Hours and hours to make something that will cut a little smoother than an ax!! Then you get to start on the handle for it. What I made was a bucksaw and pretty simple. Not too good for furniture making for sure.

    In the past, each of the hundreds of skills was the work of a different man. we are going to have to try to do it all ourselves, probably for a couple of generations. That was where the cities got started. A butcher couldn't get much done if he had to make, replace, and maintain all of his tools. The same was true of a farmer. It is ever so much more efficient to have an expert doing each necessary thing. A one-family production line that starts with growing cotton and then doing each step following that to turn cotton in the fields into clothes is an endless and impossible task.
     
  7. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    You got me to thinking here TexDanm....

    Up in the tourist Section of Colonial Williamsburg...They still have people there who can make a wooden wheel by hand...also an olde fashioned Water Bucket...a Wooden Barrel..

    They will even make you a flintlock rifle if you are want to pay that kind of monies...to get one made by hand..and it ain't cheap.

    There is even a place which makes glass the olde fashioned way...



    Asking myself if this will be a source of lost skills...when the SHTF or TEOTWAWKI.


    A Draw Knife.....W0w!!!


    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  8. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    There's a glass-blowing factory in a town about 20 miles from here. Took a grandson over there to see how real glassworks operate. And sure we have welding schools around here, but there's one that teaches students precision work to include works of art. There are gunsmiths about -- one just north of us is specifically involved in long-range mega-precision rifles "Reach out there and touch someone."

    Today I needed a rather specific tool and I said to myself, "Uh ... what am I gonna do about this sh##?"

    Light goes on in my head, begin digging through my toolbox (Dad's, 75-ish year old "made to last", wood, metal hinges, leather surfaced, mailbox). Found it, a specialty hammer, patented 1909, found it at a antique sale, bought it for $7.00. Instantly, this >100 yr old tool got the job done.

    We are so weak compared to our ancestors. I'm constantly apologizing to my ancestors for not being as hard as nails as were they. My women ancestors also. My dad's mom always kept a revolver nearby. Once, when I was 4, she burned up my legs with a green switch for being weak in her estimation. She knew that you either grew hard in this world or were surely to die or be killed. Weakness = death.
    .
     
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  9. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    I've got a workbench mountable grinder that is hand cranked. I've got all manner of non-electric drills. Bought another just two years ago in some antiques store; got it for somewhere between five and ten dollars. I mean, hey!, we are going to be without electricity for months in the not too distant future.

    I remember in electronics school having to build an AM transmitter. It was a brick, big transformer, fat diodes for rectification, big caps to lose the ripple, tank circuit with crystal, heterodyne circuit, and here's the neat part, we all used a big-@$$ tubes for our xmit circuits. What's great about big tubes? Full wave rectification. It's my oldest son who is into HAM radios. Ask me about HAM matters and I'll turn to him for answers. He likes to design and build special-purpose circuits.

    Tubes can be hit with lightning and go back into operation. When FM radio station transmitters went to solid state, FET (full-wave) giant transistors, that's when lightning began creating havoc with them. Stations started going down. Back in the days of the 4 ft. tall tubes, this just did not happen that often. They'd shrug-off lightning hits.

    Remembering back, this soviet pilot deserts out of Vladivostok and makes it to Hokkaido. Those stationed there take this puppy apart royal. Soviets were using tubes. The stupid guys laughed. The smart guys got a concerned look on their faces. The Soviets weren't being primitive. They were using tubes to survive the EMP of a nuclear strikes, likely ones initiated by themselves. The Soviets were in full-tilt, "We're going to do the deed on America and we are not going to get EMP-ed out of the air."

    Post SHTF, there's all manner of folks who know how to rebuild core infrastructure. Anybody tries to stop people of this region from doing what they want to be doing are going to get shot dead. The police chiefs (Virginia had 95 county sheriffs rebel and say that all armed men of their counties would be deputized and other patriots given sanctuary), the sheriffs' departments, and the National Guard soldiers are opposed to leftist governors and have showed up at state capitals armed with "assault" rifles. "Come take these and we'll take you out."

    Don't mess with real men and women or you are dead.

    The good ol' ways are still alive and well, but only in Heartland America. Urbanites are weak, thus dead.
    .
     
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  10. watcherchris

    watcherchris Legendary Survivalist
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    LOL LOL LOL....Olde Geezer...

    You got me to laughing about the tubes...and yes...they are rugged compared to today's solid state devices.

    Yes..I remember that about the Mig PIlot defecting with his Mig 25 to Japan.


    The Olde Ham's taught me that one of the sources for Tubes for the Olde Tube type amplifiers and radios is Russian Sources.

    They still make them. Many American sources have dried up.

    I had to bust out laughing at that one..

    How ironic life can be.


    I have purchased a spare set of tubes for my Ameritron 811 H power amplifier..Just in case...though I do not often run it.

    And now that I think about it...I do need to run this amplifier more often lest it get arthritis on me.....sputter, choke and gasp....


    Thanks,

    Watcherchris
    Not an Ishmaelite.
     
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  11. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    tools is something I have a lot of them, tons. I don't need them all for sure. Many of them are from the early 1900. Most are from my granddad, he was a self employed fabricator. Then my father had a bunch of tools, then I picked up a bunch of tools. Then I ended up with them all or nearly so.

    One of the handiest tools to have is a forge, anvils, tongs hammers and misc. With those a lot is possible.
     
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  12. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I went to buy a couple of those czech saws and they were sold out, not that I really needed them but the price is right.
     
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  13. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    We used to have an old man here that I used to love to watch at the festive we have here. He repaired and reconditioned OLD antique tables and chairs. The neat thing is that he ONLY used period-appropriate tools, techniques, and stains in the process. It was fascinating to watch. He used no power tools for anything.

    We have a lot of old-time projects here done by people at Sam Houston University on the grounds of the Sam Houston Museum. One summer a young man lived on the grounds and built a log cabin with only the tools that a pioneer would have available. Once he was housed he went to work building furniture for his cabin. I learned a lot from watching him. I often had a lot of time between jobs and my daughter and I would go and check on him and his progress. I learned a lot about old tools watching and talking to him. Because of him, I have added several draw knives of different sizes, a froe, and a collection of draw planes and blades for them. About all, he had in the way of tools was an ax, an adze, froe, bucksaw, draw knives, draw planes a hammerhead, and chisels.

    They always had something going there in the way of primitive craft demonstrations. They had a sort of little old type village with blacksmiths shop and a kitchen. There were also several of Sam Houston's homes on the property as well. We were there so much that a lot of people treated us like part of the staff. I am pretty handy and my truck was a rolling hardware stove. If they needed something fixed I just did it so we got access to all of the behind the scene things in the Museum. It was fun and good for my Daughter. She worked for me and with me in the summer from the time she was 8 or 9 until she graduated from high school.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2020
  14. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Within the past few months, I was brick'n'mortor shopping (not an antique store, not a pawn shop, ???? , not a gun show, I can't remember where) and a fellow was selling electronic equipment. One area had stacks of tubes.

    I remember as a kid going to a hardware & electronics store with an uncle of mine. Back in the day, if you were into electronics it was up to YOU to maintain your equipment. My dad and his brothers kept in touch with each other and their buddies with short wave. Cell phones as we know them did not exist. They would also listen in on the cops. That was important.

    My oldest uncle was deep into electronics (music business). He blazed a trail to the top of a hill where he built what we'd call a bouncer in this day and age. Even ran power up there -- talk about a lot of wire! See, in the mountains -- even with shortwave which is forgiving vs. high frequency -- your transmission signals got et by the mountains and they sure didn't have 5,000 watts to work with. Our town was not only in a valley, it was in a "dip" within the valley. To get a signal out'a there, you had to have yourself some sort of xmitter on a hill just to talk to folk out in the valley. That uncle had to build a whole lot of his own circuits to get what he needed. It's called poverty.
     
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  15. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I have a few big boxes of vacuum tubes and a bunch of radio misc. My father was into it and I kept the stuff.

    Here's one without tubes that a great uncle made in the early 1920s. I rewound it. One of these days I'm going to string a antenna and see about picking up a signal.

    6a866f8b76d8f2f72efabc59dbdf8020.jpeg
     
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  16. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    The old ways are not dead.

    https://friendshiprughookersblog.wordpress.com/rug-hooking-at-the-chester-inn-in-jonesborough-tn/

    =============================================

    https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/north-carolina/tweetsie-railroad-60th-anniversary-nc/

    Tweetsie Railroad has its own blacksmith shop. Today, this is only an amusement park. Back in the day, brother, that railroad was the life-blood of that area. No sh##s'n'grins about it -- that engine by-god had to roll.

    29bfc0c764124c9adc0ee9c9c1f81145.jpeg
    upload_2020-8-23_14-12-34.png

    http://www.cartercountyhistory.com/railroads-of-carter-county.html

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=historic+...na&atb=v140-1&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images
    =================================================
    https://www.facebook.com/Appalachian-Area-Chapter-of-Blacksmiths-602897423090889/

    https://aacblacksmiths.org/photo-gallery/

    ======================================

    The Thunder Five revolver design got its start in Piney Flats, Tennessee. To get one now, you'll have to buy a Taurus Judge.

    https://www.guns.com/news/2013/04/10/before-the-judge-there-was-the-thunder-5

    Going back to the 1700s, East Tennessee was a rifle manufacturing center. During the Revolutionary War, a woman in East Tennessee ran a Mega gunpowder plant. This wasn't some little cooking up some gunpowder in a kitchen -- anybody can do that. This woman was what you call a hero.

    https://www.elizabethton.com/2015/0...sputed-revolutionary-war-hero-historian-says/

    Nowadays, everybody can make their own gunpowder. I friend of mine made some rifles from scratch. He even came up with his own process of case-hardening and it was BEAUTIFUL. Holy crap, his furnace got hotter than you can imagine!

    If times go bad, Southern Appalachia will go back to making their own guns and ammunition. These stupid little sub-machine-guns only have stamped receivers, mill the bolt, rifling buttons are available online.

    Look at these Philippine gun manufacturing shacks. Proof that you are well down past idiot if you believe that firearms can be legislated-away. Only sheeple follow the law (sheep to slaughter).



    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=philippine+gun+manufacturing+black+market&qft=+filterui:videoage-lt525600&view=detail&mid=D2B30FB882D0EFF987FED2B30FB882D0EFF987FE&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=/videos/search?&q=philippine+gun+manufacturing+black+market&qft=+filterui:videoage-lt525600&FORM=VRFLTR

    ==============================
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2020
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  17. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I remember the thunder five. Been through Piney Flats many times. Back in the day I thought about stopping to see if I could buy one.
     
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  18. Rebecca

    Rebecca Master Survivalist
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    I recently discovered an interesting shop in the next county. They call themselves a salvage shop, and it's a most off putting place LOL. The building looks as if it will fall on you at any moment, and there are just piles and piles of semi sorted things for sale. But if you are good a picking the gems from the rubbish its wonderful. I got 5 cast iron pans of various sizes for $10. Oh they looked horrific but a bit of elbow grease, heat and oil and they look new again. They had a number of old hand drills that I also got amoung other things. The teller probably thought I had lost my mind with my pile of rusty pans, antique drills and ancient scale but I was very pleased. A shop worth exploring occasionally.
     
  19. randyt

    randyt Master Survivalist
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    I love poking around junk shops and old barns.

    I mentioned a forge and whatnot earlier. I recently took some junk and made up a peeling spud for logs. The leaf spring came from the hog pen. Those hogs rooted it up out of the ground. The hame end came from the barn. I fishtailed one end in the blacksmith shop and rolled it around and then riveted the hame end onto it. it works great

    0a5e14e5798b198cee40d8a69fb9a6f1.jpeg

    0a5e14e5798b198cee40d8a69fb9a6f1.jpeg
     
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