Types Of Animals Easiest To Catch?

Discussion in 'Wilderness' started by Toast, Jun 17, 2016.

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  1. Toast

    Toast New Member
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    Which animals do you think are the easiest to catch in the wilderness? Which ones do you go for, and which ones do you not think are worth the payout?
    Would you prefer to go for big game? For example, if you can get a few deer or even a bear (although the ability to eat bear meat is questionable), you can eat off that for quite a while. If you go for fewer like maybe bunnies or only one deer, it might mean you have to hunt more often. But it's more dangerous and time consuming to go for bigger game.
     
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  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
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    in the UK I would say, rabbits, squirrels and pheasants would probably be the easiest.
     
  3. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    I would have chosen wild chickens but when we went to the boondocks, I learned that you cannot catch a wild chicken with your hands for they are too quick to evade and at the sight of a human, the wild chickens would maintain a distance of at least 50 meters. You have to use guns to catch them.

    Maybe I would just settle for frogs or snails. Those are the easiest to catch in the wild although they are only present in wet places like near a river or stream or even a pond. For dry places like a prairie or forest, maybe the insects would be my source of food. But mind you, I will cook it first before I eat. With game, I don't think I will be able to catch a dear, a wild boar or even wild goat.
     
  4. filmjunkie08

    filmjunkie08 Active Member
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    The easiest food to catch really depends on what part of the world or America you live in. My cousins in Oklahoma find deer on their property, so deer is the easiest to catch for them. In my neighborhood, squirrels would be easier to come by. If one had easy access to a lake or river, then you are talking about frogs and fish. The easiest food to catch is the food growing in your particular area.
     
  5. DecMikashimota

    DecMikashimota New Member
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    Raccoons are very easy to catch. With the use of a squaller you will be able to rouse them right out of their dens easily. All you will need then is whatever method you are best accompanied with to trap your prey.
     
  6. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    You are talking about catching (trapping or catching by hand) not shooting, so I would say here where I am Kangaroos, wallabies, walleroos, goats would be easiest to trap in a trail snare. Rabbits in snares on warrens. Ducks by raft trap, Echidnas are easiest to catch by hand. Fish are easy to catch in trap or on a line.
    England? Rabbits by snare, pheasant by fish hooks or cage trap, wood pigeons by cage trap, hedgehogs caught by hand, deer by trail snare, squirrels by log snare or deadfall.
    Keith.
    [​IMG]
    Roos close to our house.
    [​IMG]
    An Echidna I came across in the forest.
     
  7. Toast

    Toast New Member
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    Are you sure it's a good idea to catch raccoons? They are nicknamed "trash pandas" so I'm not sure it's the wisest decision to catch and eat something known for it's trash diving habits. I feel like they're prone to carry disease or germs that could easily make you sick. Out of all the animals to catch and eat, I'm not sure that raccoons would be nearly at the top of the list.
     
  8. DecMikashimota

    DecMikashimota New Member
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    Despite how horrible of a diet coons have, they are edible. I have a few friends in Virginia that eat coon now. I'm not sure that any type of meat is really good for us so I honestly feel that if we can eat everything else then we might be able to handle scavengers like these as well.

    It may sound a little risky but these animals have digestion systems that can completely break down whatever it is in their diets. From what I'm hearing, as long as they are gutted and cleaned properly, there should not be a problem.
     
  9. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    In Hawaii the easiest thing to catch are the ones that don't run or with limited speeds. Limpets, sea urchins, and crabs are the easiest to catch. Little kids can be given that task. All you have to do is go off to the rocky shores and pick them off the rocks. There isn't very much meat on them, but if you catch enough of them, it will make you full. Those are the easiest to catch near the ocean.

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  10. Karen Martin

    Karen Martin New Member
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    The easiest animals to catch in the wilderness to eat are squirrels, rabbits, fish and turtles, because they are easier to cook as well and majority of the animals take like chicken! They also make the best soups to hit the spot to feed a family in the wild and will last a couple of days for survival!
     
  11. Jewelweed

    Jewelweed Member
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    The problem with large game from my point of view is whether there will be a lot of waste. Could we eat or preserve it before it went bad? We have pretty high heat and humidity here so it would be inedible pretty quickly. In a wilderness survival situation, I'm not going to have access to generator and fuel; my solar panels can't power the freezer very long either. I've tried salting and brining but wasn't happy with the results. In a wilderness situation, will you have access to the materials to do that? With some care, meat can be canned over a fire but that's still for if I have a base-camp setup with canning supplies stored. I like the idea of going for big game and being able to use or store it to have a steady supply for a while but I'm not sure it's really practical. Maybe making pemmican from a deer kill might be an option?

    In a wilderness situation, I'd go for small meat - rabbits, squirrels, birds, turtles, fish, insects (like grasshoppers), lizards (brown enole are plentiful here, easy to catch, and super-simple to cook), and snakes. Ducks are surprisingly easy to get with a net too. I'd also gather edible plants and be prepared for the fact that I might not always eat as well as I'd like.
     
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