Uk Shore Erosion

Discussion in 'News, Current Events, and Politics' started by Pragmatist, Dec 2, 2019 at 2:10 AM.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      452/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  2. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
      480/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I don't know why people who build on a coast line are surprised by erosion. There may be some volcanic islands that get larger in size but almost all land masses are reduced in size by water / ocean erosion, no surprise there.
     
    Caribou likes this.
  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Norfolk is low lying and its FLAT.
    coastal erosion has been a fact of life in the UK for decades probably even longer.
    the piece mentions LOOE in Cornwall, my second wife was born and brought up in Looe and during the spring tides she has seen the sea come over the harbour wall, in the back door of the houses and the pubs and out the front door, the same used to happen in Bideford in Devon but there it used to come up through the drains.
     
    Caribou, Brownbear and TMT Tactical like this.
  4. Brownbear

    Brownbear Expert Member
      230/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Everywhere has a degree of coastal erosion. Lonewolf is absolutely right in what he says in his post above. The particular area written about in the paper is especially prone to erosion, sand cliffs and rough seas etc. Originally there was a mediaeval city called "Dunwich" close to there, the remains of which are almost a mile offshore. The properties that are collapsing are mostly what we in the UK called "prefabs" i.e.wallboard etc, and we would consider them as temporary dwellings. In today's climate one would not be able to get permission to build in those areas on the coastal side of the villages and, in some villages, people have been rehomed and their houses pulled down.

    Britain is an island, this is what happens in island communities :)
     
    TMT Tactical and lonewolf like this.
  5. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      193/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    What happen to any land title there when the property has been engulf by sea erosion or sea level rise?
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    don't know what the legal ramifications are but as the land is now part of the sea or at least the beach I doubt they have any legal redress.
     
    TMT Tactical and varuna like this.
  7. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      452/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Varuna,

    In reply, I can only write the US concept of land titles although believe it's the same as in the UK.

    The land title will say one boundary line is the "mean low tide mark". It will not show a tape measurement from a fixed monument on land outward to the sea.

    ...

    IFfthe mean low tide mark encompasses some minerals and thus the mineral rights, similar/same in US as in UK and Indonesia and Timor.
     
    TMT Tactical and varuna like this.
  8. Caribou

    Caribou Master Survivalist
      250/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    My family holds patented tidelands you might wind up with rather damp Realestate. If enough people are affected the political pressure on the government could be such as to get them to do a land swap or make other accommodations. We see this here with native villages built on river deltas where the river channel changes, as they are want to do.

    My mother and aunt, early and late 90's, talk about going down to the beach, with their parents, each winter to watch houses fall into the Pacific. That was probably due to global warming. Oh wait, that would have been in the late 1920's and 1930's, before California pumped all their oil out of the ground, before Eisenhower built the highway system, before the population exploded, before smog was an issue in Los Angeles.
     
    TMT Tactical and varuna like this.
  9. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
      193/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    You mean US gov't can "appropriate" any land title without paying any kind of compensation? :confused:
    In practice, in the event where the gov't compensating the land owner, how much the gov't pay? Is it at a profit, market price, or . . .. ? :confused: Is there any specific set of law that regulate the amount of compensation the gov't need to pay? :confused:

    Thanks beforehand, I'm just curious as what the practice of compensating private citizen land title in country with common law system
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  10. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      452/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good evening Varuna,

    I going to scribble some comments and hopefully not interfere with any narrative Caribou is planning to post.

    The US has a highly modified form of the Common Law we inherited from the English Common Law. Basically, yes, the US Government and the political subdivisions, that is the states, cities, counties and the others entities can "appropriate" private land under the British concept we inherited called "eminent domain". The Government must take the land for a "public use" (eg building a road or highway, a public airport). Compensation is required and basically it's "fair market value" to price real estate.

    MUCH litigation and media operations are involved in "fair market value".

    About 10-15 years there was a case, now famous, where the government of the City of New London, Connecticut sought to obtain a residence house under "Eminent Domain". The city wanted to obtain the property and some others for a private developer who would have some business venture with these properties - I forgot the details - with the view that the new developer would bring into the city more tax revenue . The business venture didn't work out. The initially seized house owner, Susy Kelso, sued the city. It went to the Supreme Court. She lost.

    I'm omitting much and there's surely much, much more to the real estate doctrine of eminent domain, but above is the basics.

    Do note that an eminent domain seizure might not be a private citizen's house. It could be a rich and powerful corporation. ... especially if mineral rights are involved. One of the mineral rights is petroleum. Big legal battles occur.


    ...

    New London, Connecticut is home to the US Coast Guard Academy. Coast Guard has a large presence south of here. New London is next to Groton, Connecticut where there's a sub base and shipyard.
     
    TMT Tactical and varuna like this.
  11. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    came past one of our periodical landslides yesterday, about 15-20 miles away from where we live, it wasn't coastal as such but it was near an estuary and it was caused by a lot of recent wet weather which permeated down through the ground and caused it to slide, its an area known to be prone to such happenings.
    post SHTF these sorts of collapse wont be cleared up and will block roads, I have talked to so many people who think post SHTF the roads will still be there and useable but this wont be the case.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Frying Pan Tower - Offshore North Carolina News, Current Events, and Politics Sep 7, 2019
Some Beach Erosion Pictures News, Current Events, and Politics Nov 19, 2019

Share This Page