Vertical Gardening

Discussion in 'Gardening, Plant Propegation, & Farming' started by joshposh, Jun 10, 2016.

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  1. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    Most of us would use the excuse of not having adequate space to have a organic garden at home. That's where Vertical Gardening comes into play. If you can't grow it outwards, you can always go up. I got this idea from watching a TV show that featured a family that grew 90% of their daily calories from their backyard that has gone upwards. It goes to show you that, every one has some space to prep.

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  2. Coputere

    Coputere New Member
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    These days you can find that there are DIY tutorials right on Pinterest for all of your vertical garden needs. You are 100% right. There is absolutely no excuse for not building your own mini organic empire right in the comfort of your own home. Hanging a Wooden Shelf that will be able to support your Vertical Garden has now been made easy. Of course there will be some measuring and cutting involved but for the most part it is still pretty simple so there is no reason not to.
     
  3. richj8am30

    richj8am30 Member
      18/23

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    The supplies that are needed are few and inexpensive in most scenarios. You can even buy a Chain-link Vertical Garden right from a store. If that’s the case then all you will have to do is devise a way to screw the hanging chain-link part of your vertical garden by screw or other effective method to the ceiling. Just add an an irrigation water filter and you’re nearly set.
     
  4. Endure

    Endure Expert Member
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    You can even hang Recycled Soda Bottles from a clothesline, cut it open it by a side, fill it with compost soil and then grow a small plant there.
     
  5. Corzhens

    Corzhens Master Survivalist
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    Vertical gardening is also emerging in Metro Manila. I see some thoroughfares with vertical plant holder used for display in the avenue islands. It is nice to look at in the urban area because those plants in vertical planter boxes project a breath of green that somehow contradicts the concrete jungle of the city. However, told me that it is not really that good for the crops because the planter box is more of a display in design.

    In photo is the upright trellis where tomatoes are crawling, that's a good method because they are likened to the trellis of grape vines (tomatoes can also be considered vines). I guess farming is in a paradigm shift with the new designs of planting methods. I am also thinking of buying a wire pot for hanging. They say it is good to plant mint in a hanging pot so the leaves will be dangling and easier to pick... and clean too because the danling mint it is not touching the soil.
     
  6. ToTang45

    ToTang45 Expert Member
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    Agreed. I have so many Pinterest print-outs. I mean folders and folders.
    When/if the SHTF we need those hard copies do we not? It's also handy right now as I don't have to stare at a screen (mein eyes!!!) to get instructions on how to do just about anything, now do I have an absolutely cluttered favorites section on my computer.

    As for vertical gardening, don't take for granted just how much you can do with it. Hell, with slings to take the pressure of the plant you can find instructions on growing even Pumpkin and Watermelon vertically to save space!!

    http://offbeathome.com/vertical-pumpkin-patch/

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  7. Verity

    Verity New Member
      1/23

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    Some companies sell things that look like large shoe racks that you place on your fence for a vertical garden. I've had friends do it with shoe racks and pallets. I've been so interested in this as I live in a more urban area. That means no big back yard for me anymore. :( I was worried about not being able to garden anymore since I've moved, but I've been reading more and more people are very successful with their vertical gardens. So, hopefully I will be too!
     
  8. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    We've put cucumbers on trellises before. It's almost necessary because they go everywhere. We left them on the ground one year and wow, it was so hard to find the cucumbers! The trellises are much easier to manage.
     
  9. Valerie

    Valerie Active Member
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    I too have tried the vertical gardening thing. It works! Not only does it save oodles of space, it gives you more space to grow vegetables and fruit. Plus, it's sustainable and looks nice.
    Since I've moved to Japan, I haven't had the time to set up a vertical garden, but now that I have some free time, I'm slowly gathering the supplies needed for the set up.
    I'm going to trying growing cucumbers, zucchini and tomatoes.
     
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  10. OfTheEarth

    OfTheEarth Member
      18/23

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    I love ideas like this + greenhouses. I am definitely going to be all over this as soon as I can be, I can see it now...a small little place that I deeply enjoy with food I can eat all around me, straight off the vine, knowing exactly where it came from. I can't wait :D
     
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  11. Lisa Davis

    Lisa Davis Active Member
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    We always had space when I was growing up and never had to garden vertically. However, I don't have the space that I used to and going vertical seems like a great way to utilize space. I know people that grow their tomatoes vertically with great success and they really like the fact that they have more room in their backyard that was previously taken up by their garden.
     
  12. willywonka

    willywonka Member
      18/23

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    I have seen some wool shoe storage type of devices as well, but they easily run up to $45 a sheet just because they say that the material retains a lot of the moisture that goes into it. I was thinking of getting one because I have a tomato topsy turvy and that thing is a pain in the rear with all of the water running down. It makes a mess and I can't keep it indoors.
     
  13. chelsknits

    chelsknits New Member
      8/23

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    Those pictures are amazing! I've actually heard about turning old pallets into vertical gardens, but you obviously can't grow anything that requires much depth in those. It would be good for herbs and things like that though.
     
  14. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    You mean like these pictures? And they are labeled too.

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    I had no idea that you could do this actually. The local grocery store in my hometown has a mountain of pallets in the back of the store. They said that they ship them back to the supplier all the time and we are more then welcomed to take them if we want. After looking at this at fence building I might be inclined to take their offer.

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  15. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    Tomato cages are a good way to go with the tomatoes. They are easy to set up and they hold the tomatoes up nicely. Found readily at feed stores, even Walmart. They keep the plant up off the ground and make nice rows.
     
  16. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    You mean something like this?

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    Now correct me on this one. Now these cages are made for the tomato to grow straight up instead of outwards, correct? If that's the case, then skies the limit with growing tomatoes.
     
  17. cluckeyo

    cluckeyo Well-Known Member
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    @joshposh These are a little different than the ones I have, but these would work great. They are actually taller than mine, which would be good for some varieties. Mine are kind of shaped like cones. There are determinate and indeterminate tomatoes. Indeterminate goes spring to fall. Determinate dries up in the summer.
     
  18. filmjunkie08

    filmjunkie08 Active Member
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    The vertical gardening that I have seen is done on the side of a wall. It is independent of the ground. Perhaps there are different types of vertical gardening??
     
  19. chelsknits

    chelsknits New Member
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    Yes, exactly! I've never seen them labeled before though, that's an awesome idea. It would e cool if you painted them with chalkboard paint so that you're able to erase the writing on it if you planted something else there next season, so you wouldn't have to paint over the writing or plant the same thing. That picture with the pallets made into a fence is a great idea too. It would be perfect for me to section off the area where I'm going to keep my plants.
     
  20. Jeremy-K

    Jeremy-K New Member
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    Here's a rough supply list of a mininmal 20+ yielding sight (yield depends on how high you go)
    -5 Gallon Bucket
    -4"-6" wide pvc tube or 5" fence post (you can go as tall as you'd like, most cut the piping down to 5 foot tall)
    -Cap for pvc tube or fence post cap(2 will be needed)
    -200+GPH submersible pump
    -T-tube fitting
    -Appropriate length of tubing/hose/vinyl tube for connection of pump to t-tube

    Minimal Tools needed
    -Drill
    -Jigsaw

    Considering you may be in a survivalist mode, you would need access to an electric supply to power the tools and the pump. However there is are hand tool non powered versions of a drill and jigsaw that can be used. You would also be responsible to for ensuring the roots are getting water.

    These items can be used the traditional vertical hydroponic "rain tower" that can be searched online for instructions and how to videos.

    There are other alternatives that don't require electricity at all such as the deep water culture method.
     
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