What kind of bag is ideal for a survival kit?

Discussion in 'Survival Kits' started by cyclistbabe, Jun 6, 2016.

0/5, 0 votes

  1. cyclistbabe

    cyclistbabe New Member
      3/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I know a lot of the things that are ideal in a kit, but what's the ideal bag itself? What materials are ideal?

    I'm thinking a hiking pack may be best as I could throw it on and be mobile for a while before getting tired. Something that goes over the shoulder is probably out of the question. I was also considering a 'fanny pack' type deal, but I don't know if there would be enough room. Regardless I would likely get one anyway to keep small things in. Anyway, what's your setup for your bug out bag? What material(s) is it made of? If it helps, I like in the Northeast. We have all four seasons and the only time it's really wet is May. It typically snows anywhere from December to March, but there are outlying storms.
     
  2. Nedbushcrafter

    Nedbushcrafter Expert Member
      143/173

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Get yourself a good medium Alice pack they are bulletproof and they will carry just about most things they have a frame but ya can use it without if it was me I'd keep the frame ya can carry extra kit then If needs be
     
    lonewolf likes this.
  3. Nedbushcrafter

    Nedbushcrafter Expert Member
      143/173

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Unfortunately they are over the shoulder most packs are
     
  4. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
      330/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Any good sturdy pack bag box that you can carry with your gear in it with ease most choose some type of backpack so hands are free
     
  5. Arkane

    Arkane Master Survivalist
      275/297

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I have layers not A pack as such!
    I have a wide leather belt with the bare essentials
    Then I have a small pack with living kit in it!
    And then the weapon of choice with that weapons sustainment satchel!
     
  6. cecejailer

    cecejailer New Member
      3/23

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I think the best kind of bag would be thermal, those that keep both heat and cold in. Also, bags that don't weight too much. You want something resistant but not heavy. Always choose backpacks, I think this goes without saying. You don't want to be bothered by an uncomfortable bag.
     
  7. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    Any well made knapsack should be fine. If it has zippers, then they must be heavy duty. Personally I do not like zipper closures at all.
    Keith.
    7gYBnhzLLVC3BHrVPC0MdrJIRdJifBZ5.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
  8. GS AutoTech

    GS AutoTech Expert Member
      232/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Our family of six go hiking while camping. We all have mid grade backpacks. Sturdy water resistant nylon. Comfortable padded straps that clip together across the chest. They all have a hydration pouch & port for the hose. Multiple spacious compartments. These bags were pretty inexpensive ($40'ish) for what they offer & can easily support 72 hours worth of kit.
     
  9. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    1
    For short term I have a gear belt with suspenders. I would be comfortable with just that for at LEAST 72 hours. Then i can also pull on a medium alice pack without the frame. If you are on the move there is a reason and you probably don't want to be weighed down so that you will be slow if something pops up. Try to keep your needs small but as varied as possible. I have a fanny pack kit that will also keep me going for a week or so. If you over load yourself you will hurt yourself unless you are in great shape and accustomed to this sort of wear and tear.
     
    GS AutoTech likes this.
  10. GS AutoTech

    GS AutoTech Expert Member
      232/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I used to wear Alice suspenders clipped to a wide quick latch type duty belt. It was a good way to support holster & canteen. Not very modular tho. Now the new Molle gear is widely popular & adaptable to almost infinite number of configurations.
     
  11. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    I don't like the idea of a 72 hours kit or a 24 hour kit or whatever, I don't see the point. My whole kit is my survival kit. You can't possibly know what may go down at any given time & how long this situation will last. I recommend that you think sustainable & long term.
    Keith.
     
  12. GS AutoTech

    GS AutoTech Expert Member
      232/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Si
    So very true my friend. It's no secret that you're expertise & wisdom runs deep.
    It makes sense that most who are interested in gaining some if that wisdom will start somewhere. Such as a 72hr bug out bag for common events like a blizzard or hurricane. Using a similar bag to for 72hr intentional camping / walk abouts to test your survival skills. Building up that wisdom & confidence. Hopefully that 72hr bag will quickly develop into that long term survival kit. :)
     
    Keith H. likes this.
  13. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
      335/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I don't mind the concept of a 72 Hour kit or Bug Out. On the down side it is woefully inadequate, and may give a false sense of security. On the up side it is a start, and it will put you 72 hours ahead of most people. At least you will have something. My recommendation would be a minimum of a 7-10 day kit.

    To get back to the original question I would recommend a mid size back pack made of strong material and good heavy zippers. I have had good luck with the North Face brand. Make sure it will hold everything you need, and you can carry it by yourself, unassisted.
     
  14. TMT Tactical

    TMT Tactical The Great Lizard !
      377/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    For pack / bags. Test the fit before purchasing. A million body types and one bag does not fit all. Add weight to the bag while testing for fit. The best built bag in the world is worthless if it does not fit YOU.
     
    CountryGuy, Morgan101 and lalakai like this.
  15. lalakai

    lalakai Well-Known Member
      97/115

    Blog Posts:
    0
    it's a personal choice but if you use a military pack it will draw attention to you when you don't want it. A pack with an external frame is great for loading stuff and can carry a heavy load comfortably, but my emergency bags are internal frames as they are easier to maneuver in a pinch. As for size, put together a kit that holds the bare bones minimum and see how much room you need; things that are critical in emergencies as you run out the door because the house is on fire or a mob is approaching. Packs with lots of pockets are nice, except in hostile crowds that will steal anything they can....you will end up carrying your pack in front of you, to protect items in pockets. A pack with a good functional waist belt takes the load off your shoulders and distributes it on your hips, not only reducing fatigue but also lowering the center of gravity in the pack. A book bag or day bag is just that.......carry books or stuff you use in a day.....don't use them unless you have no other choice. And definitely buy a good name brand pack; their quality control is usually higher and the quality of their components is usually higher. That being said, you need to start somewhere and most people will buy a pack on sale or one that costs a 1/3 of a similar sized name brand bag. Experiment with it and learn before you put more money down. I still have a Jansport D3 external frame that I bought in 78....zippers all work, frame is scratched and ugly, but it's utterly dependable and I can carry a full load over rough terrain for miles, without ending up like an invalid. And there's nothing wrong with buying a pack in a garage sale or on ebay, if it's close to what you want.

    Good hunting
     
    Morgan101 and TMT Tactical like this.
  16. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    military kit including camo will draw attention in a city, in the countryside nobody looks twice.
    well out here they don't.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  17. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    Any pack anywhere will attract unwanted attention post shtf!!! Some people will want to take what you have in that pack!!!
    Keith.
     
    TMT Tactical and lalakai like this.
  18. CountryGuy

    CountryGuy Expert Member
      153/173

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I think this is really an "it depends". I think the idea of walking out the door with everything on your back to survive till eternity is doable for a select few but is not realistic for even most "hard core" survivalists/ preppers. I prepare for things based on probability - is it more probable that a tornado wipes out my home and we need to get out quick or to at least have a few days taken care of or do I think a pandemic will hit tomorrow that kills off 99% of humanity in 3 days or a financial collapse creates a shtf in 24 hrs. To me even a "72 hour" bag is a misnomer. With a little ingenuity and rationing I think many could go a week or more. For us our BOB's are for a "we gotta to get out and fast" contingency, otherwise we're focused more on being in place. I don't mean this to sound harsh but the folks thinking it's gonna be a Red Dawn run off to the mountain and survive existence would be like a miniature poodle dropped off in the wilds of Alaska; they're not going to last very long before the wolves eat them.

    I'd think if anyone lives in a urban area the best thing they could do is have supplies stashed somewhere like a storage unit, friends garage, etc so their entire goal and kit is to help them get from the city center to that outer fringe location to resupply and move forward from there. To me this is going to need to be smaller lighter bag, like a shoulder bag/ haversack/ small laptop style backpack. Holds a few things but is lightweight and lets you move fast while others are likely still spinning in circles. I'd say you need to put a pack or bag on today and walk around and see if you get looks and what draws attention, a military or hiking pack will likely throw up flags even today, a smaller bag like I've mentioned or even a quality day pack/ school type pack won't maybe a darker color like navy blue or forest green that is still a dark subdued color without looking tactical even black in this style will blend. But some small pack that has molle all over it and looks tactical or that's coyote brown/ black/ FDE green much less military pattern camo is gonna get sideways looks. Likely you might get less looks if it were a hunting camo like RealTree but in a city setting that's going to standout.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2019
  19. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
    7
    I will not comment on what is "doable" for urban survivalists, I do not live in a city or even a town, but I will say that if one has the skills required to live long term in a wilderness situation, then the majority of the equipment one carries is for comfort, & living/surviving long term in the wilderness is doable.
    Keith.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  20. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Master Survivalist
      410/460

    Blog Posts:
    0
    How about a shoulder-strapped beautiful heavy leather bag containing a silver-lined ceramic water filter, scrap silver coins, and a holstered nickel-plated .357 loaded with Winchester Silvertips!

    Don't scratch the engraving. Pretty guns attract Satan to your side and Satan always wins in this world. My family knew this thing. They survived right through the non-survivable.

    And, Satan dresses well to boot.
    c5ed9f194974261b594dbfeda4cd603e.jpeg
    c5ed9f194974261b594dbfeda4cd603e.jpeg c5ed9f194974261b594dbfeda4cd603e.jpeg
    upload_2019-4-21_14-59-37.png

    And one must have their survival caviar!
    c5ed9f194974261b594dbfeda4cd603e.jpeg c5ed9f194974261b594dbfeda4cd603e.jpeg
    c5ed9f194974261b594dbfeda4cd603e.jpeg c5ed9f194974261b594dbfeda4cd603e.jpeg
     
    Morgan101 and TMT Tactical like this.
  21. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Expert Member
      227/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    No single bag is "ideal" for every person. People are different with different needs.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  22. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Expert Member
      190/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Must mention: The basic rule is a pack frame is ideal for flat terrain. For inclines and slope walking, avoid pack frames.

    The "Northeast" has places like the Green Mountains of New Hampshire - winds like western mountain states and also tidal basins like around JFK airport, New York City.

    Cyclist contributor must factor this into best overall pack selection.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  23. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    when people get a bit older they will realise a pack frame is the ONLY pack to use. its kind to your back and supports the weight of the pack.
     
    TMT Tactical and Sonofliberty like this.
  24. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Expert Member
      190/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Was discussing the - basic rule - about packs.

    I am 72 yo and do not like the out of kilter center of gravity change with a frame when walking up inclines.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  25. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    i'm slightly younger than you, not much, and I have had packs with no frames, packs with internal frames, and packs with an exterior frame and I would pick the last one every time no matter what the terrain, I currently have an Alice pack.
     
    TMT Tactical and Sonofliberty like this.
  26. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Expert Member
      190/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good morning Lone Wolf,

    It might just be preference, based on perception,..it's my experience that I do better walking the inclines with a no-frame pack.

    I also like the Alice pack except for overseas when I avoid anything of MILSPEC.
     
    TMT Tactical and lonewolf like this.
  27. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    well it was my personal preference, that's all:D like they say on the adverts, other types are available!!
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  28. Oldguy

    Oldguy Master Survivalist
      250/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I have moved away from the single pack concept, I now have layers
    I have an essential belt order, knife, fire kit, survival kit, water bottle, multitool, waterproof cloak, trauma kit, navigation kit and a few bits an pieces.
    then a daysack/small backpack, mostly water, filters, a little food, more shelter, hatchet and folding shovel, flysheets and string, net hammock, cook kit etc
    and to top it off I have weapon specific satchels/shoulder bags, one bag for the gun I carry stuffed with ammo, cleaning/repair kit for that particular gun.

    This setup is far more adaptable than a single large pack.

    I do not keep any essential kit in pockets as they fail easy but I keep a space blanket in each rear trouser pocket.
     
    TMT Tactical and Morgan101 like this.
  29. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Expert Member
      190/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Good afternoon Oldguy,

    Didn't believe Lone Wolf and I were discussing single pack versus other arrangements.

    When I carry a large pack, its load-out does not include a sheath knife (I usually carry an OKC 12" chisel tip survival machete),small fire extinguisher, satellite phone, flash light and strobe light. These things are on my equipment belt.

    I have a big pack mainly for a max loft sleeping bag and some other items.

    One of my arrangements is wearing 2 cargo vests with "essential" stuff I deem essential....might not be essential. It depends on the current objective.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  30. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
      335/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Oldguy: I believe I have evolved in a very similar fashion; and I would like to think each step up will keep me prepared longer, and more thoroughly. Start with an Everyday Carry combined with a Get Home Bag that stays in the car. Small, very portable. Move up to a Bug Out Bag that would include more clothing and food. More of a 72 hour bag. The Largest would be an INCH bag that would include more tools and shelter. All of them start with the five C's. All of them include IFAK's. A couple of add-ons include an ARK (armed response kit) for weapons, ammo, cleaning. An expanded med kit with toiletries, and personal items (meds, glasses, personal hygiene.) Dry bags for just that mostly clothing and blankets. All of it is readily accessible, and could be assembled in five minutes depending on the severity of the emergency.

    I don't know that one bag is practical. You could make do if you had to, but I prefer the layers.
     
    TMT Tactical and Sonofliberty like this.
  31. CountryGuy

    CountryGuy Expert Member
      153/173

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Having humped an Alice you can keep them, way to heavy though I love the Alice Bag, I'm also a fan of the newer Molle frames with the plastics frame -- which I'm told you can fit an Alice bag to. I have several different internal frame bags that have served me very well, be them Kelty, North Face, Marmot or Jansport's higher end packs. I'd love one of those Eberlestock packs but until I win the lottery or sell a kid the price is to steep for me.

    Out of curiosity where do your loaded out packs weigh in at or those using this layered approach all the layers combined with your utility belts (why am I hearing the Batman theme song... ) weigh out at?
     
    Morgan101 and TMT Tactical like this.
  32. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Expert Member
      227/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I never weighed my belt or what is in my pockets. My inch bag weighs just over 40 pounds.
     
    CountryGuy and TMT Tactical like this.
  33. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
      335/345

    Blog Posts:
    0

    My EDC and Get Home Bags are pretty manageable; both in the 10-15 pound range, and a part of that, a firearm and clips, would be transferred either to a belt or vest. My INCH bag is a load; probably in the 40-50 pound range. We can be mobile or portable, but we certainly won't be fast. It is better suited to a car evacuation.

    CG: I am with you. I love the Eberlestock packs, but it brought tears to my eyes to see the price. They are pretty proud of those. Put that one on the someday, maybe list.
     
    TMT Tactical and Sonofliberty like this.
  34. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    my get home bag is a waist bag(what we call a bum bag), very small, very light and easy to carry but contains everything I need to get home in an emergency.
     
    TMT Tactical and Morgan101 like this.
  35. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
      335/345

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Mine as well, although the style would be considered a satchel or shoulder bag. Nothing fancy. Very basic. Lonewolf, I think we might call your style of bag a fanny pack. Excellent choice.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  36. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    yes, I was thinking that was what you called it. nothing fancy, reasonably cheap and fairly common.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
  37. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Expert Member
      227/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    I would be interested to know what you have in a fanny pack for GHB. Approximately how far will you be traveling to get home? any special terrain? how about predators two and four legged?
     
    TMT Tactical and Morgan101 like this.
  38. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
      335/345

    Blog Posts:
    0

    I won't speak for Lonewolf, but I will say it is not hard to do. When I first started prepping one of the people that impressed me was Cody Lundin. He had a " Never Go Into the Woods without This" kit. The link shows the basic contents. I have put together several kits that easily fit in a fanny pack. All of them include the 5 C's. I kind of made a game out of it to see how small I could go. I made a really nice fire kit that fits in a prescription pill bottle 3" high and 1" diameter. Put electrical tape around the closure, and it will float. Altoids tins work for first aid and fire kits. Much depends on how far you have to go, and some things I would consider a "given". If it is Winter I will be wearing the appropriate clothing. I would bet that almost all of us could grab a few things from our car, and be just fine. It doesn't take much to get home.

    I understand the security issue, but to me, that is not something that goes in a GHB. That is carried all the time. I will always carry it separately, and conceal it appropriately.

    Have some fun, and see how small a kit you can make.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/Ultralight/comments/bawrq4/cody_lundin_an_ultralight_survival_expert/
     
    TMT Tactical and Sonofliberty like this.
  39. Sonofliberty

    Sonofliberty Expert Member
      227/230

    Blog Posts:
    0
    Honestly, if I started in spring or early summer, I think I could live indefinitely off of my EDC and my belt kit. It would be a rough start, but once I got over the initial hump I would be fine. I have not made a complete list of my "web belt kit", but I do have the lists made of my EDC and my "web belt first aid kit".
     
    Morgan101 and TMT Tactical like this.
  40. lonewolf

    lonewolf Moderator Staff Member
      510/575

    Blog Posts:
    0
    too much to list actually, we are talking a GHB not a BOB so its just enough to get me home, could be any distance as the contents would remain the same but my average distance is probably around 25-30 miles. terrain would be rural. no four legged predators and two legged probably only post SHTF.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Any Airplane Drivers Here...??? Pilot Kind'a Persons. The Hangout Yesterday at 12:53 AM
Amazon Kindle Unlimited.......question. The Hangout Jul 11, 2019
What Kind Of Prepper Are You? The Hangout Apr 2, 2019
How Does One Know If Things Are Getting "kind'a Bad"? News, Current Events, and Politics Jan 15, 2018
Is The Solar Eclipse Some Kind Of A Warning Sign ? Other Not Listed Situations Aug 10, 2017
Do You Feel Safe For Carrying Some Kind Of Weapon? Safety Jul 20, 2017
Do You Have Any Kind Of Superstition? General Q&A Jul 20, 2017
Kindness Of Strangers In Times Of Disaster Newbie Corner Jun 30, 2017
Tinder & Kindling Confusion. All Resources About Fire Aug 4, 2016
what kind of car do you drive? The Hangout Jul 6, 2016

Share This Page