Where Do You Think Would Be The Best Place To Go Off Grid?

Discussion in 'Going Off The Grid' started by Tanner Kozlowski, May 15, 2017.

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  1. Tanner Kozlowski

    Tanner Kozlowski New Member
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    Going off grid has always been a consideration of mine for years, and have wanted to at least try it for a few months to see if I would like it. One question that I have always had about going off grid would be where is the best place to go off grid and successfully do it? Im talking states or countries with the best areas that are secluded and truly off grid. If you have any ideas of places that you think would be great for starting an off grid journey let me know as I am very interested to get some input on this topic.
     
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  2. Koala

    Koala Well-Known Member
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    Have you considered New Zealand? it's an island, good places for planting and farming crops, not too high population... as far as I know they're quite keen on the off-grid living.

    Or maybe Oregon, Three Rivers? they have a community there and they live off the grid. This might be an easier option than New Zealand. Don't know how hard getting into the actual country is.
     
  3. kamar19

    kamar19 Member
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    I have a friend in New Mexico, and he tells me there is an off-grid community out there. I would say generally speaking, places that are warmer seems to be ideal for off-grid living, but here in Florida, the local government is cracking down on off-grind living, which is sad if you ask me, off-grid living is in no way a crime.
     
  4. joshposh

    joshposh Expert Member
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    I would think that you need to have access to water, via underground well or nearby river. Then you need to think about an area with adequate and constant wind and sun to run your wind turbines and or solar panels. Just because you see a plot of land, it doesn't mean you can set up camp and live off grid. Number one would be water. Without a well or source of water, it's going to be a uphill climb or a dead issue if you don't have that near by.
     
  5. JeffHart

    JeffHart New Member
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    I've thought about Alaska. Uncharted territories. Great water sources. Fresh air. Plentiful wildlife for hunting.
    Although, some parts of Alaska can have brutal weather and the darkness for several months would be very hard, but possible.
     
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  6. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    More secluded places in Australia than you can shake a stick at. I would stay clear of the tropics for two reasons, 1) easy enough to keep yourself warm, but not so easy to stay cool 2) cyclones & storms. Here in Australia we have the tropics at one end, & the Alps & Snowy Mountains at the other end. We are off grid in between. We get four seasons, reasonable rains & plenty of sun for our solar power.
    Having a river or creek is good, but these places are usually more expensive, & you can never be sure that the water is not contaminated from higher up. We have header streams & dams & we store rain water in tanks.
    Wood heating/cooking is the cheapest & most sustainable providing you don't have to purchase your wood supply! So having woodland or a forest is a must. We live in a forest.
    Access. Poor access can sometimes mean a less expensive property, & really if you are going to be in a secluded place, then you need to have a 4WD vehicle.
    Keith.
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  7. SirJoe

    SirJoe Expert Member
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    Normally the easiest places are the more isolated areas. Since most companies aren't wiling to connect you to the grid it's a viable option.
     
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  8. overcast

    overcast Member
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    Most harsh would be Mongolia. And it can be extremely not just with weather but due to local issues. Also the amount of weather changes makes it harder to stay. But it is the best place to go off the grid. I have found that even the Himalaya is a nice place in such context. You can also go off the grid in China but local population is not welcoming in that condition. New zealand has it's share of nature and places to go off the grid.
     
  9. GS AutoTech

    GS AutoTech Expert Member
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    I'm real liking many parts of West Virginia. Lots of resources for living off grid. Low population in the most rural areas.
     
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  10. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    A very rural area in any state orcountry things to consider weather and climate water sorce and advalibilty power for shelter solar wind or hydro what is going to work best in the area you choose the choices are yours to make and the work to make it is yours to do
     
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  11. Ecologically Impared

    Ecologically Impared New Member
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    Canada. We have the most water, least venomous animals, and there isn't many people here compared to other countries. Where I live you may have to deal with a tornado every few years, but it rarely causes any damage and when it does, it's minimal. It rains enough to sustain a farm on a well, even if you don't store rain water other ways, and although the growing season isn't as long as I'd like the soil is forgiving. Most of the praries would be ignored because no one is going to go looking for survivors in the middle of nowhere (some field) and most people don't own guns so it's safer to approach other survivors. Just have to watch out for the rez dogs and hungry coyotees.
     
  12. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Are there any critters in Australia that are not poisonous? I would expect to find in Aus fanged butterflies. Spider bites in Aus cause the victim to become paralyzed, blind, melt into napalm, then explode into flames. Australian ducks have stingers that shoot out they butts, stick into you, cause you to sing "The Good Ship Lollipop", then you fall down and break into pieces. Australia dangerous. That's why it was used as a penal colony -- God abandoned the place right after creating it.

    Besides, when the Chinese learn how to build troop xport ships, the PRC military will run over the top of Aus in 5 or 6 hours. Government down under doesn't trust the people with semi-autos, so when the Chi-comm attack, there will be nothing the Aussies can do to fight back against the occupation.
     
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  13. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Oh, about forgot. China has well over a billion humans. Australia has no nuclear arsenal -- the ONLY way to defend against mega-armies. China will inevitably take over all of Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Australia. It will take years/decades, however such is inevitable.
     
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  14. Keith H.

    Keith H. Moderator Staff Member
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    True, but then again this is a big country & not many people. Regardless of the survival scenario, Australia could still arguably be the best place to be. We can site the Chinese & Indonesia as possible enemies, but then again what is the most likely scenario? If I thought there was a better place to be right now, I would probably be there.
    Keith.
     
  15. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Your kids will be at risk. The huge risk, due to time-frame, is to your grandchildren. China is a commie cancer.
     
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  16. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
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    The problem with going off grid is that when you get far enough out to be safe there is no way to make a living there. Most of us, when we were young had to work and make decisions based on what we could realistically afford to do. Being old is great. Between my wife and I we can live anywhere and have our checks direct deposited in the nearest bank... but then what is the point. Our home is paid for and honestly we have more money than we can spend. Our wants are mostly silly things like my knife addiction but when we were younger we needed to be someplace where there were people to make a living.

    I am a machinist, electrician, mechanic, gunsmith, AC/Heating certified repair tech, plumber, carpenter and can fix and/or build almost anything and own my own little company. She is a Dental Hygienist. Both pay real well but tie you to a certain level of civilization.

    I live in the country outside of a town population about 500 that is 15 miles from a town that has about 30,000 people and about a hundred miles from Houston. That was the best I could do balancing between being OUT but able to make the kind of living we wanted.
     
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  17. Tom Williams

    Tom Williams Moderator Staff Member
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    Town is 28 miles erie 70 we made a livein well now retired we still survive well off the farm its nice not to have to worry about thejob and the farm both so life is good mrs smackes me when she gets calls because my phone & radio are turned off lol
     
  18. Joe Stonecipher

    Joe Stonecipher Expert Member
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    I'd set up anywhere out in the country where you don't anticipate a big stampede of sheeple if sh** hits the fan. You can have electric lights and water, if things go to hell just trip your breaker, close your water valve and you're "off grid."

    Have you're own well with a hand pump or solar panels to run a pump motor. You can have solar panels and use them to run your refrigerator, freezer or well when the sun's shining.
     
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    1. Joe Stonecipher
      Of course, you need a well - with some alternate way of pumping the water when the electric grid is off, such as an ole fashioned hand pump.

      You'll also need a septic tank and drain field - just make sure they're all gravity fed.
       
      Joe Stonecipher, Feb 22, 2019
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  19. coffee

    coffee Expert Member
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    I agree. I think West Virginia, in a rural area, could be awesome. Lately, I have also been thinking a lot about Kentucky. I never hear anything bad, or good for that matter, about Kentucky. What do the rest of you guys and gals think about Kentucky? Let me know,
     
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  20. coffee

    coffee Expert Member
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    I agree. I think West Virginia, in a rural area, could be awesome. Lately, I have also been thinking a lot about Kentucky. I never hear anything bad, or good for that matter, about Kentucky. What do the rest of you guys and gals think about Kentucky? Let me know.
     
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  21. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    All places east of the Mississippi plus the bread-basket states are taken -- or known about by the hunters. Anybody moving in MUST know / be a part of the culture -- ESPECIALLY IN DIXIE. City-slickers, Yankees, and such will be overrun in hard times. Urban areas in the south will suffer the same fate as urban areas all over -- they'll burn. Urban refugees will not be welcome in the heartlands and risk being shot dead. FEMA camps are for the sardine people. Will right-wing headbangers be arrested? Yes, the ones into criminality/psycho-crap, but that's not what the FEMA camps are for. Plain ol' conservatives can't be put away, because they are who make up real law enforcement and the sections of the military branches who bring about the death and destruction thingy, the face to face killing.

    When the urbanites call upon the military to do their dirty work for them, they'll be in for a most horrific response.
     
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  22. Morgan101

    Morgan101 Master Survivalist
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    'Mid pleasures and palaces
    Though I may roam
    Be it ever so humble
    There's no place like home

    I will stick to the good ole USA. Plenty of places here with everything you need. Temperate climate, good farm land, plenty of water, no neighbors. Virtually unlimited choices. Pick what suits you best.
     
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  23. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    good old (north) Devon for me, I spent 10 years out of the county and I couldn't wait to get back and I'll never leave it again.
     
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  24. LastOutlaw

    LastOutlaw Master Survivalist
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    The best place to be off grid is where there is no power...LOL.

    SE Oklahoma and SW and NW Arkansas has a large amount of off grid areas. The Ouchita Mtns. and the Ozarks Mtns land runs around $1000 to $2000 per acre. No or minimal code restrictions. Low taxes. Oklahoma just passed Constitutional Carry laws.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  25. LastOutlaw

    LastOutlaw Master Survivalist
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    I'm sorry but I disagree somewhat with this statement. I believe that about 50% may be what you described but there are many in today's military and police who do not necessarily fit this description. Many will do exactly as they are asked to do without questioning their orders.
     
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  26. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Old Geezer seems to have full understanding of the pulse of America .
     
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  27. Radar

    Radar Master Survivalist
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    Kentucky at one time had a lot more Amish and Mennonite families. From what I understand, a lot have left or aged, and moved further west, Montana, Idaho, or northern, into Indiana. Always looking around at real estate, a few years ago I found several properties in Kentucky that were off-grid but not advertised as such. They were former homes of Amish or Mennonite families. One of them had a large meeting room, no electricity, (I forget about plumbing), but it was a beautiful home on quite a few farming acres at a very attractive price. I'm going to guess that was 10-12 years ago. I'd have jumped on that if my s/o had agreed to it.
     
  28. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    One very important consideration on choosing your survival area . What kind of people live in that area ? Can you leave your door unlocked when you are gone and be reasonably comfortable during your absence nobody will enter your home ? Some no doubt will think that kind of place doesn't exist anymore , but they are wrong . Old Geezer 's previous post make me think about someone that came to visit me from deep in Dixie . After driving for ten hours to get to my rural retreat they were so afraid someone would break into their home they stayed about two hours and then drove ten hours back . I had an Uncle that lived in Washington State . Him and his wife had to take turns whenever one needed to leave the house the other would be left at home on guard duty . In a S.H.T.F. situation you want as the bible says people that are Salt Of The Earth people in your area . I understand why some preppers "probably most " think they will need a full automatic rifle and lots of amo to mow down their neighbors .
     
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  29. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    most of the sheeple will be dead or dying within about 6 weeks, 2 months at most, once the power goes off, there is no food in the stores and all the mains water is off, they may be able to steal some food but without clean drinkable water their time is numbered in days.
    that's your hunker down period, after that just keep your eyes out for stragglers .
     
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  30. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Very good advice , Last Outlaw knows what he is talking about . Too far north preppers have to deal with life threating cold with no electric or propane heat . Too far south the mosquitoes will suck you as dry as a rasin and unlike the old deep south the people will react like what we saw them do during hurricane Katrina .
     
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  31. LastOutlaw

    LastOutlaw Master Survivalist
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    Here is a link to land under $25,000. Some even around $1000 per acre in Oklahoma
    https://www.landsofamerica.com/Oklahoma/all-land/under-25000/

    And in Arkansas

    https://www.landsofamerica.com/Arkansas/all-land/under-25000/
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
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  32. Old Geezer

    Old Geezer Legendary Survivalist
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    Under the category of "many rural areas are already taken by the black of heart", there's a Netflix series called "Murder Mountain" concerning counties in N.California. Their first episode name is "The Redwood Curtain". Watched this episode during lunch. My handicapped son likes having these cable tv shows. Not like he can jump up and go much of anywhere. So I watch this thing. What does it remind me of? Yes, Southern Appalachia and the white lightning business. Nowadays up in them thar hills it includes car and truck chop shops; stolen vehicles taken apart for their parts -- protected by county law enforcement (sometimes run and operated by county sheriff's departments). One can make a lot more money on the parts than the vehicles themselves. Parts are sold as "refurbished" ... yeah, sure.

    As for rural Northern California, not for the weak in spirit it appears; might get "lost":

    https://www.netflix.com/title/80217475

    My upbringing taught me that rural areas are not the bucolic myth the greater populace often considers them. I love/hate where I'm from.

    http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/doyle/rural.html
     
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  33. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    I just returned from a trip in the western U.S. . I don't leave the rural area I reside very often . Looking at people with the eyes of a prepper , it was a bit of a cultural shock . People have lost their grit . I am used to the more hardy type . Power down for a year or two and few will survive . Even the folks strutting around in their park ranger costume will not last long . I was sort of like that guy on the movie " blast from the past " . Luckily for me I had someone with me that knew how to go through an airport and navigate with a GPS .
     
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  34. Dalewick

    Dalewick Master Survivalist
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    Ease up on us Hillbillies! LOL! Just joking! Life in these mountains has changed little in the last 50 years, maybe even the last 100 years. There are now some tourist areas but there are still areas where tourist, government agents or any outsider better not go. If they do, there is the likely hood that they will never be seen again. Moonshine has been replaced with meth and marijuana and there is more tech available. Much of WV still has no cell phone coverage and GPS doesn't want to work on the dark side of many mountains. It's just the way it is.

    Dale
     
  35. Duncan

    Duncan Master Survivalist
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    I'm not sure what "off-grid" means other than life without the national/regional/local electrical grid. My first choice (if I could get there) would be the three countries comprising the former Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (Micronesia), which is where I grew up from ages 3-17. Tropical environment with few poisonous animals and 24/365 climate from 70-90 deg F, daily rain showers for a water catchment, lagoon teeming with marine animals, and -- outside the towns -- tropical plants including taro, breadfruit, coconut, and tropical fruits.

    They're foreign countries with a special relationship to the US (their national currencies are the USD and their primary language is English; you can lease land on a long-term basis by figuring out whom to bribe; the folks are friendly enough; and you can buy pretty much whatever you need (gasoline, diesel, non-perishable foodstuffs) if you go to one of the larger villages; and even an Internet cafe!).
    One of the countries (Republic of the Marshall Islands) is not sustainable over the next 50 years, given the fact that the highest point is two meters above sea level, but the Federal States of Micronesia (Truk, Yap, Ponape, Kusaie) and the Rep. of Palau couldn't be beat.

    Check it out here. Most of the pictures are underwater ones, but there're some good land ones, too.
     
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  36. varuna

    varuna Tree killer & a cat person
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    For me, it's will be out on the open sea and at least 40 mm away from the shore baseline on-board passage making capable boat.
     
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  37. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Very accurate observation Dale . People come from hundreds of miles to visit Branson Missouri , have a good time and leave . But they seldom see the real Ozarks . Dirt roads and hillbilly people living at least fifty years in the past , and in some respects that could includes me as a backward person living in a time warp . That makes the area a very survivable place for a prepper . I have heard rumors of one guy that lives under a rock and eats acorns " no joke " . Some of our older U.S. members might remember the old Dog Patch cartoons about a primitive bunch of hillbillies . There is a old amusement park now shut down that operated years ago with that theme called Dog Patch .
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2019
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  38. LastOutlaw

    LastOutlaw Master Survivalist
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    One of the problems with the back country areas is if you move there you will be considered and treated as an "OUTSIDER". Unless you have family that is from there and is well known as such you may be an outsider and on your own with almost no assistance when needed from neighbors or others. As long as you are ok with doing everything yourself and having no assistance with large jobs then you will probably be ok. You will however be an "OUTSIDER" for many years. Expect to watch the neighbors get together to cut and bale hay but turn you down if you would like to get in on the area group hay baling season. Even if you try to pay them. If they do accept payment it will cost you more than it does to just buy hay.

    Another problem with leaving your doors open or unlocked in almost all areas today is caused by "DRUG USE". Even in nice rural areas where everyone seems to watch out for one another or each other's property all it takes is a couple of offspring to be strung out on METH or CRAK and "there goes the neighborhood". Burglaries start to take off and people who have always been able to leave their doors unlocked are getting their guns and medicines stolen as soon as they drive to town to go to the store. I have lived in nice neighborhoods and watched the kids grow from toddlers into teens and at some point all it takes is for a couple of them to reach the age of becoming burglars and there goes the whole neighborhood. I don't care if you are 100 miles out in the country, up north or down south or in the mountains or suburbia. This happens everywhere today. Kids grow up to be teens. Kids start experimenting with drugs, kids get cars and nowhere is safe from their addiction. Don't be stupid, lock your doors and keep OPSEC a top priority.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2019
  39. lonewolf

    lonewolf Legendary Survivalist Staff Member
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    I live in an area most modern city people could/would not, it is rural, remote and I have been told its "in the middle of nowhere", a supermarket even a small one is a 40-50 mile round trip which really amazes some urban relatives !!
     
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    1. Dalewick
      LOL! Yep, 42 mile round trip for a loaf of bread or jug of milk. 104 miles round trip to see a movie or eat in a decent sit down restaurant. Wouldn't trade it for anything.
       
      Dalewick, Oct 25, 2019
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  40. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    Lastoutlaw I agree with your previous post but will point out a couple of examples of my area . There is a pile of cut and split fire wood I drove past a few minutes ago siting on a dirt road with no houses around for sale . All a buyer has to do is put his cash in a bucket that is hanging on a fence post load up the wood and leave , no one is around but the purchaser . I have seen that bucket so full of unguarded cash that I have weighted it down with a rock to keep it from blowing away . The wood seller doesn't even check his bucket regularly and it often sits there on that post overnight . He has been in business for years . ---- There are stands with items for sale siting on the side of the highway with no one around . A buyer simply puts his money in a tin can gets the purchased item and leaves . Yes we do have some drug addicts but so far their misdeeds have not caused the community to go into lockdown . Mess up around here and you may disappear forever .
     
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  41. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon Dale,

    Yes, I know limited cell phone coverage in West Virginia.

    Madam and I visited Blair Mountain, site of the nation's 2nd largest insurrection (labor matter, post WWI) and no communications until we drove off the mountain.
     
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    1. Dalewick
      Yep, that's most of WV. I have one carrier that has reception at my house, and that's all. The bottom of the yard has "0" reception. Get away from the main highways and it may be a couple hours before you run into reception again.
       
      Dalewick, Oct 25, 2019
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  42. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good afternoon Poltiregist,

    I remember the cartoon strip that gave us the now-famous term "skunk works"; a term meaning a hidden government crash-program to get some project accomplished ASAP no questions asked. Had once worked on one of these.

    Is this the same cartoon strip ?
     
  43. poltiregist

    poltiregist Legendary Survivalist
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    yes - one and the same . Even then that far back this place was considered primitive There was actually a black and white film made in early film making days depicting how primitive the people here are . I think the name of that film was " child bride " and likely could be found but has been banned due to one blury scene and probably for being too honest of the environment that was here during the time the film was made . The film revolves around the town of Jasper Arkansas .
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2019
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  44. Joe Stonecipher

    Joe Stonecipher Expert Member
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    I'm continually astonished by people wanting to live "off grid" NOW! As I said above, any good defendable, rural homesite wil do and most electric utilities will pay you to install some significant solar panels. When the bad times come, just trip your breaker and you're off grid.

    We currently live in Florida, where we have our own well, septic tank and drain field. We're on Fla. Power and Light and they're glad to help you install some solar panels. Live comfortably with modern conveniences until SHTF happens. I'm retired and had 42 years in the electric utility industry, so why get rid of something good until you have to?

    I'm not going anywhere if some bad times come and I don't think anyone is going to find an "off grid" site to hide from the world.
     
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  45. Sourdough

    Sourdough "eleutheromaniac"
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    SORRY...........got'ta disagree with that.
     
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  46. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
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    Good morning Joe,

    Some of the most knowledgeable and with the means, have located "off grid" - appropriate sites. The big status symbol in metro Washington, D.C. is a well-stocked BOP with medical facility in nearby West Virginia.

    "Defendable" no longer directly relates to trespassing drifters and roving gangs but rather diseases - especially those caused by mosquitoes and rabid mammals.

    I can't develop a BOP in West Virginia because of my age and a few other specifics. Others are developing BOPs in the several West Virginia type areas of our nation.
     
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  47. Duncan

    Duncan Master Survivalist
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    I'd always wanted to be 'off grid' since I first started reading Mel Tappan and the Mother Earth News back in the 1970's. I spent a couple of years working at a photovoltaics manufacturing house in the mid-1980's which gave me a better idea of what PV could (and couldn't) do. Now that I have a (reasonably) self-sufficient homestead, the only leash I have is electricity to run my well-pump.

    However, I'd pencil-whipped PV as a backup for my grid system (stand-alone, NOT grid-tie) and it's just not cost-effective. For abouit $5-6 hundred I can get a hand-pump and 150 feet of stainless steel pipe that I can put in my well without disturbing or compromising my electric pump. Hopefully, I'll be able to get it by next fall.

    But a word to all you off-grid wannabees: 99 percent of the time, no electricity means no water, and without water you and yours will die an unpleasant death.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2020
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  48. TexDanm

    TexDanm Shadow Dancer
      525/575

    Blog Posts:
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    Mel Tappan's book "Survival Guns" was probably one of the larger influences on me and my views of getting armed and ready back in the late 70s. Before that, I was a survivalist that was armed but not in the same way. Mother Earth News back then was, along with Grit about the only magazines that address the special needs of people that were losing faith in the grid life and urban nightmares.

    I never wanted to go off-grid so much as I wanted to be non-grid-dependent. that is what I am now. I like having an AC and this computer but if the power goes off tomorrow I have plenty of non- powered alternatives, stores and ways to protect my place. I admire people that can drop everything and just go off into the wilderness but unfortunately, I never saw that as something that I could afford to do to my family. My wife was raised 30 miles from nowhere in the corner of a thousand-acre rice paddy. They raised and caned a lot of their food and meat animals. SHE wanted to give civilization a try. LOL, it got old fast but our jobs held us there until the economy crashed in the 80s. Now she is back to living 20 miles from nowhere again.

    The best place to go is someplace where you can be happy, among people that you understand and can relate too and that offers you as many alternative ways to feed your family as possible. For some they want to be totally isolated...others want to have neighbors but at a bit of a distance. Close enough to hear you fighting if attacked but far enough that you can not have to look at them all the time. If you are an urban person you are going to have a hard time fitting in if you move out and surround yourself with a bunch of redneck hillbillies. In hard times outsiders are not going to be very popular. The places that seem friendly to visit or vacation will find that the same folks are going to be much less pleased to see you if you show up when things are starting to get rough.
     
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  49. Pragmatist

    Pragmatist Master Survivalist
      485/575

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    Good morning Duncan,

    So true: water.

    Now also add the pharmaceuticals. Dawn knows what is needed.

    From our olden lore: " ... anointed my head with oil". I'm willing to bet it wasn't olive oil nor Mario Andretti's STP oil additive. It was something from the Egyptian pharmacopoeia.

    We need water and the stuff to protect against the smallpox, Yellow Fever, flu, the "new" Corona virus, ...
     
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  50. Duncan

    Duncan Master Survivalist
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    Absolutely. I knew that, at 73, I wouldn't be physically able to build my own home, raise a barn, etc. Nor would I have the expertise to begin to raise livestock, fence my pasture, know what to plant and when, and even survive if a medical emergency happened to either Dawn or me. I'm also a gregarious person, willing to strike up a conversation with a new neighbor or even a person I meet at the farm store. I am by no means a "rugged individualist" and have enough sense to accept it and use it as a strength rather than a weakness.

    This is why our present situation (a low-density, rural area but with four neighbors within a mile of our homestead) perfect for is. I can pee in the pasture, but walk to the neighbors. They can (and do) drop by with offers to help and a dozen ears of corn in the fall, and are grateful for fresh fruit and eggs when we have any extra. They've made sure to ask us if we want in on 2-3 of us getting a side of beef or a pig for the freezer. They have asked our help on a few occasions, but have helped us in many more ways. I even had a guy whom I didn't know at the time come by, introduce himself, and said something like "Brother Billingsley in our Ward said you might be able to help me drop a Geissele trigger in a rifle"! I could, I did, and we became good neighbors; I don't think you'd ever see that in urban or even suburban America -- at least not in Arizona! They're mostly Mormon and conservative Republican -- and we're not -- and they're cool with that.

    Probably so. We were city folk, but we were lucky enough to move here before any major SHTF incidents, and we tried to come across as people who didn't know much and were humble enough to listen to any advice and willing to help with what little we could. It paid off. Acceptance takes time and sincere effort on your part.

    If you think this approach is a good one for you and your family, I'd suggest you make your move soon. Times may get a lot harder, and land is getting more expensive all the time.
     
    TMT Tactical likes this.
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